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Archive for December, 2009

10 Best Jobs / Careers for Women Over Forty

In a nationwide survey, we asked midlife women to define the most important elements of a great job. In addition to a good salary and benefits, you told us you want a profession with a bright future, a high level of control and a flexible schedule.

We grilled the experts to find careers that deliver. Ready, set, reinvent! (saying Kate Ashford in More.com)

1. Community Service Coordinator/Manager

(volunteer coordinator, program director)
Salary: Most earn $42,110 to $73,470
Top 10% Make: $96,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to grow 48% by 2016
What You’ll Need: BA, passion for a cause
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Most in the field work for nonprofits or the government

2. Personal Financial Adviser

(financial planner)
Salary: Most earn $46,390 to $119,290
Top 10% Make: $166,000
Why Now: One of the 10 fastest growing occupations, it’s projected to boom 41% by 2016
What You’ll Need: A solid business background plus education in the field. You’ll probably also need Series 7 and Series 63 or 66 licenses
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 30% are self-employed

3. Environmental Scientist

(hydrologist, environmental ecologist, environmental chemist, ecological modeler)
Salary: Most earn $45,340 to $78,980
Top 10% Make: $103,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to grow 25% by 2016
What You’ll Need: Most positions require a master’s degree in environmental science, hydrology or a related natural science
Entrepreneur Opportunities: About 2% are self-employed

4. Registered Nurse

(critical care, emergency, oncology, clinical)
Salary: Most earn $51,640 to $76,570
Top 10% Make: $92,000+
Why Now: A projected 587,000 new nursing jobs will be created by 2016
What You’ll Need: A BS in nursing (four years), an associate’s degree in nursing (two to three years) or a diploma from an approved nursing program
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Although some nurses provide care as independent contractors or wellness coaches, most are employees

5. Computer and Information Systems Manager

(chief technology officer, management information systems (MIS) director, information technology (IT) director)
Salary: Most earn $88,240 to $141,890
Top 10% Make: $166,000+
Why Now: This field will add 43,000 jobs by 2016
What You’ll Need: A bachelor’s degree and sometimes a master’s degree—consider an MBA with a focus on technology
Entrepreneur Opportunities: These tend to be leadership positions within a company

6. Education Administrator

(principal, assistant principal, provost, dean of students, school district administrator, director of student services)
Salary: Most earn $68,360 to $102,830 (elementary and secondary school)
Top 10% Make: $125,000+
Why Now: Many will retire in the next decade
What You’ll Need: Experience as a teacher or in a field such as recruiting. Some positions require a master’s degree
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Most work for school districts or universities

7. Strategic/Crisis Communication Professional

(crisis manager, strategic communication specialist)
Salary: Most earn $38,400 to $71,670
Top 10% make: $98,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to create 43,000 new jobs by 2016
What You’ll Need: Public relations experience
Entrepreneur Opportunities: With the right expertise, it’s possible to provide this service as an independent contractor

8. Accountant

(public accountant, management accountant, government accountant, internal auditor)
Salary: Most earn $45,900 to $78,210
Top 10% Make: $102,000+
Why Now: The field will grow 18% by 2016, adding 226,000 jobs, and these positions are available in every industry
What You’ll Need: A degree in accounting or a related field. You have to pass an exam to become a CPA
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 10% are self-employed

9. Human Resources Specialist

(job analyst, compensation manager, employee benefits manager, training and development manager, recruiter)
Salary: Most earn $35,020 to $67,730
Top 10% Make: $84,000+
Why Now: There will be 147,000 new specialist jobs created by 2016
What You’ll Need: Depends. To specialize, you may need an MBA with a focus in HR management
Entrepreneur Opportunities: About 2 percent are self-employed

10. Small-Scale Niche Farmer

Salary: Most earn $26,800 to $76,230
Top 10% Make: $97,000+
Why Now: Small farms are growing at a rate of 10,000 a year
What You’ll Need: Nothing—training is done on the job
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 80% are self-employed

10 Best Jobs / Careers for Women Over Forty

In a nationwide survey, we asked midlife women to define the most important elements of a great job. In addition to a good salary and benefits, you told us you want a profession with a bright future, a high level of control and a flexible schedule.

We grilled the experts to find careers that deliver. Ready, set, reinvent! (saying Kate Ashford in More.com)

1. Community Service Coordinator/Manager

(volunteer coordinator, program director)
Salary: Most earn $42,110 to $73,470
Top 10% Make: $96,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to grow 48% by 2016
What You’ll Need: BA, passion for a cause
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Most in the field work for nonprofits or the government

2. Personal Financial Adviser

(financial planner)
Salary: Most earn $46,390 to $119,290
Top 10% Make: $166,000
Why Now: One of the 10 fastest growing occupations, it’s projected to boom 41% by 2016
What You’ll Need: A solid business background plus education in the field. You’ll probably also need Series 7 and Series 63 or 66 licenses
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 30% are self-employed

3. Environmental Scientist

(hydrologist, environmental ecologist, environmental chemist, ecological modeler)
Salary: Most earn $45,340 to $78,980
Top 10% Make: $103,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to grow 25% by 2016
What You’ll Need: Most positions require a master’s degree in environmental science, hydrology or a related natural science
Entrepreneur Opportunities: About 2% are self-employed

4. Registered Nurse

(critical care, emergency, oncology, clinical)
Salary: Most earn $51,640 to $76,570
Top 10% Make: $92,000+
Why Now: A projected 587,000 new nursing jobs will be created by 2016
What You’ll Need: A BS in nursing (four years), an associate’s degree in nursing (two to three years) or a diploma from an approved nursing program
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Although some nurses provide care as independent contractors or wellness coaches, most are employees

5. Computer and Information Systems Manager

(chief technology officer, management information systems (MIS) director, information technology (IT) director)
Salary: Most earn $88,240 to $141,890
Top 10% Make: $166,000+
Why Now: This field will add 43,000 jobs by 2016
What You’ll Need: A bachelor’s degree and sometimes a master’s degree—consider an MBA with a focus on technology
Entrepreneur Opportunities: These tend to be leadership positions within a company

6. Education Administrator

(principal, assistant principal, provost, dean of students, school district administrator, director of student services)
Salary: Most earn $68,360 to $102,830 (elementary and secondary school)
Top 10% Make: $125,000+
Why Now: Many will retire in the next decade
What You’ll Need: Experience as a teacher or in a field such as recruiting. Some positions require a master’s degree
Entrepreneur Opportunities: Most work for school districts or universities

7. Strategic/Crisis Communication Professional

(crisis manager, strategic communication specialist)
Salary: Most earn $38,400 to $71,670
Top 10% make: $98,000+
Why Now: The field is expected to create 43,000 new jobs by 2016
What You’ll Need: Public relations experience
Entrepreneur Opportunities: With the right expertise, it’s possible to provide this service as an independent contractor

8. Accountant

(public accountant, management accountant, government accountant, internal auditor)
Salary: Most earn $45,900 to $78,210
Top 10% Make: $102,000+
Why Now: The field will grow 18% by 2016, adding 226,000 jobs, and these positions are available in every industry
What You’ll Need: A degree in accounting or a related field. You have to pass an exam to become a CPA
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 10% are self-employed

9. Human Resources Specialist

(job analyst, compensation manager, employee benefits manager, training and development manager, recruiter)
Salary: Most earn $35,020 to $67,730
Top 10% Make: $84,000+
Why Now: There will be 147,000 new specialist jobs created by 2016
What You’ll Need: Depends. To specialize, you may need an MBA with a focus in HR management
Entrepreneur Opportunities: About 2 percent are self-employed

10. Small-Scale Niche Farmer

Salary: Most earn $26,800 to $76,230
Top 10% Make: $97,000+
Why Now: Small farms are growing at a rate of 10,000 a year
What You’ll Need: Nothing—training is done on the job
Entrepreneur Opportunities: 80% are self-employed

New Research Examines How Career Dreams Die

(According to PhysOrg.com) — A new study shows just what it takes to convince a person that he isn’t qualified to achieve the career of his dreams.

Researchers found that it’s not enough to tell people they don’t have the skills or the grades to make their goal a reality.
People will cling to their dreams until they’re clearly shown not only why they’re not qualified, but also what bad things can happen if they pursue their goals and fail.
“Most people don’t give up easily on the dreams. They have to be given a graphic picture of what failure will look like if they don’t make it,” said Patrick Carroll, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University at Lima.
The findings are especially relevant now as students prepare for an uncertain job market and they, along with their teachers and guidance counselors, try to find the best career choices for them.
“Educators are trying to lead students to the most realistic career options,” Carroll said. “You want to encourage students to pursue their dreams, but you don’t want to give them false hope about their abilities and talents. It’s a fine line.
“This research is important to understanding how students make revisions in their career goals and decide which career possibilities should be abandoned as unrealistic given their current qualifications. They can then zero in on more realistic possible selves that they actually are qualified to achieve,” he said.
Carroll conducted the study with Robert Arkin, professor of psychology at Ohio State, and James Sheppard, professor of psychology at the University of Florida. Their results appear in the current issue of the journal Social Cognition.
The research included two similar studies involving separate groups of 64 and 70 upperclass business and psychology students at Ohio State.
The students signed up to meet with a career advisor to learn about a supposedly new master’s degree program in business psychology that would train them for “high-paying consulting positions as business psychologists.”
However, the program didn’t actually exist. The goal was to get the students interested in the program, and see how they reacted when faced with varying levels of threat to their new dreams of becoming a business psychologist.
All the students filled out information sheets which included their current grade point averages.
The students were then separated into four groups. Students in the control group were given an information sheet indicating no GPA requirement for the program.
The other three groups were given sheets indicating the GPA requirement was .10 above whatever they had listed as their own GPA.
In one of these groups, the “career advisor” – who actually worked with the researchers — simply pointed out that the students’ GPA was lower than the requirement.
In another group, the threat was raised slightly: the advisor told the participants that they weren’t what they were looking for in the program and that it was unlikely they would be admitted. But the advisor encouraged these participants to apply if they were interested, because they might be reviewed by a lenient admissions committee.
The last group received the strongest threat to their hopes of becoming a business psychologist: they were also told they were not qualified, but might sneak in with a lenient admission committee. But the advisor added that if that happened, the student would probably struggle with the high demands of the program and ultimately end up with no job prospects if he or she somehow managed to graduate.
To add to the threat, the advisor mentioned that he or she knew of cases at other schools where unqualified students couldn’t get placed in jobs after graduation and often ended up in low-paying office jobs unrelated to business psychology.
“In this case, the students were given a very vivid picture of what might happen if they failed,” Carroll said.
In both studies, the results were similar and striking. The students in the control group and those who were simply told their GPA was too low for the program didn’t give up the dream. In tests given after their meetings with the career advisor, these participants actually showed declines in the amount of self-doubt they had about their abilities and showed higher levels of commitment to pursing the degree.
“We have a brilliant ability to spin, deflect or outright dismiss undesired evidence that we can’t do something,” Carroll said. “We try to find reasons to believe.”
However, students given the most vivid threat had higher levels of self-doubt immediately after meeting with the advisor, lower expectations and lower commitment to pursuing a business psychology career.
Carroll said anxiety played the key role for getting these students to drop their interest in becoming business psychologists.
Those who received the strongest threat began with high levels of doubt about their abilities. But they then also experienced much higher anxiety levels as they considered the vivid prospects of failure presented to them.
This led them to lower expectations about getting in to the program, and finally lower anxiety when tested later as they dropped their dream and accepted the fact that they would not become business psychologists.
Carroll said he sees the relevance of this research nearly every day, as students seek his input about career plans or the possibility of graduate school. Sometimes these students have not gotten good enough grades or shown the work ethic they would need to succeed at higher levels, he said.
Still, Carroll said he doesn’t often use what he knows to bring these students back to reality.
“I’m very cautious about using what I know with students,” he said. “You’re dealing with people’s dreams and hopes, and with that awareness comes great responsibility.
“The dreams of who you could become are a very important part of how you define yourself, yet they are very vulnerable given that they exist only in our mind’s eye as the best possible guesses from current evidence of what we could become in the future,” he said. “We need to learn more about how those career dreams are constructed and revised.”
In new research, Carroll and his colleagues hope to do just that. The new focus is on what happens when people have to reject certain goals for the future, and whether this process hurts them or helps them find new goals.

New Research Examines How Career Dreams Die

(According to PhysOrg.com) — A new study shows just what it takes to convince a person that he isn’t qualified to achieve the career of his dreams.

Researchers found that it’s not enough to tell people they don’t have the skills or the grades to make their goal a reality.
People will cling to their dreams until they’re clearly shown not only why they’re not qualified, but also what bad things can happen if they pursue their goals and fail.
“Most people don’t give up easily on the dreams. They have to be given a graphic picture of what failure will look like if they don’t make it,” said Patrick Carroll, co-author of the study and assistant professor of psychology at Ohio State University at Lima.
The findings are especially relevant now as students prepare for an uncertain job market and they, along with their teachers and guidance counselors, try to find the best career choices for them.
“Educators are trying to lead students to the most realistic career options,” Carroll said. “You want to encourage students to pursue their dreams, but you don’t want to give them false hope about their abilities and talents. It’s a fine line.
“This research is important to understanding how students make revisions in their career goals and decide which career possibilities should be abandoned as unrealistic given their current qualifications. They can then zero in on more realistic possible selves that they actually are qualified to achieve,” he said.
Carroll conducted the study with Robert Arkin, professor of psychology at Ohio State, and James Sheppard, professor of psychology at the University of Florida. Their results appear in the current issue of the journal Social Cognition.
The research included two similar studies involving separate groups of 64 and 70 upperclass business and psychology students at Ohio State.
The students signed up to meet with a career advisor to learn about a supposedly new master’s degree program in business psychology that would train them for “high-paying consulting positions as business psychologists.”
However, the program didn’t actually exist. The goal was to get the students interested in the program, and see how they reacted when faced with varying levels of threat to their new dreams of becoming a business psychologist.
All the students filled out information sheets which included their current grade point averages.
The students were then separated into four groups. Students in the control group were given an information sheet indicating no GPA requirement for the program.
The other three groups were given sheets indicating the GPA requirement was .10 above whatever they had listed as their own GPA.
In one of these groups, the “career advisor” – who actually worked with the researchers — simply pointed out that the students’ GPA was lower than the requirement.
In another group, the threat was raised slightly: the advisor told the participants that they weren’t what they were looking for in the program and that it was unlikely they would be admitted. But the advisor encouraged these participants to apply if they were interested, because they might be reviewed by a lenient admissions committee.
The last group received the strongest threat to their hopes of becoming a business psychologist: they were also told they were not qualified, but might sneak in with a lenient admission committee. But the advisor added that if that happened, the student would probably struggle with the high demands of the program and ultimately end up with no job prospects if he or she somehow managed to graduate.
To add to the threat, the advisor mentioned that he or she knew of cases at other schools where unqualified students couldn’t get placed in jobs after graduation and often ended up in low-paying office jobs unrelated to business psychology.
“In this case, the students were given a very vivid picture of what might happen if they failed,” Carroll said.
In both studies, the results were similar and striking. The students in the control group and those who were simply told their GPA was too low for the program didn’t give up the dream. In tests given after their meetings with the career advisor, these participants actually showed declines in the amount of self-doubt they had about their abilities and showed higher levels of commitment to pursing the degree.
“We have a brilliant ability to spin, deflect or outright dismiss undesired evidence that we can’t do something,” Carroll said. “We try to find reasons to believe.”
However, students given the most vivid threat had higher levels of self-doubt immediately after meeting with the advisor, lower expectations and lower commitment to pursuing a business psychology career.
Carroll said anxiety played the key role for getting these students to drop their interest in becoming business psychologists.
Those who received the strongest threat began with high levels of doubt about their abilities. But they then also experienced much higher anxiety levels as they considered the vivid prospects of failure presented to them.
This led them to lower expectations about getting in to the program, and finally lower anxiety when tested later as they dropped their dream and accepted the fact that they would not become business psychologists.
Carroll said he sees the relevance of this research nearly every day, as students seek his input about career plans or the possibility of graduate school. Sometimes these students have not gotten good enough grades or shown the work ethic they would need to succeed at higher levels, he said.
Still, Carroll said he doesn’t often use what he knows to bring these students back to reality.
“I’m very cautious about using what I know with students,” he said. “You’re dealing with people’s dreams and hopes, and with that awareness comes great responsibility.
“The dreams of who you could become are a very important part of how you define yourself, yet they are very vulnerable given that they exist only in our mind’s eye as the best possible guesses from current evidence of what we could become in the future,” he said. “We need to learn more about how those career dreams are constructed and revised.”
In new research, Carroll and his colleagues hope to do just that. The new focus is on what happens when people have to reject certain goals for the future, and whether this process hurts them or helps them find new goals.

Useful Tips To Recession Proof Your PR Career

Since world slowing turning into recession, companies cutting costs and unemployment rising, it is quite difficult to sustain a career in a company or organization. PR Industry still has the potential to see through recession rein. Here are some very useful tips offered to recession proof your PR Career in this tough recession time:  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )

  1. Stay visible: Your instinct may be to lay low during a recession, but that’s the last thing you should do. In uncertain times, you want to make your presence known by showcasing your value to the organization and being an active team player.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  2. Prepare mentally: Since things can take a turn for the worse without warning, it pays to develop a realistic back-up plan before the situation calls for one.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  3. Make a positive impact on the bottom line: Employers increasingly view their staff as “mini- profit-and-loss centers rather than just as employees,” notes Careerbuilder.com. So, ask yourself how your projects and initiatives are benefiting the company. If they are not contributing in some measurable way, reevaluate your job-preservation strategy.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  4. Perfect your skill set: To boost your market value, keep your skills up to date. Investment in your education, whether its earning a more advanced degree or taking training courses to stay on top of the latest technology and corporate trends, will give you lifelong skills. They will help you do your job better and make you more marketable if you should need or want to switch careers in the future.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  5. Speak up: Talk with your immediate supervisor or other higher-ups if you have any concerns about the future of the company or your career direction. Conversations of this kind reflect a sincere interest in the well-being of the company, as well as your own future. Don’t be afraid to do some independent research and to ask tough questions, such as “what’s being done to safeguard the future of the company and ensure continued success?”  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  6. Network: Studies show that building rapport with past and current colleagues is one of the easiest, yet most often overlooked, ways to stay on the right track. Networking can be especially valuable in a sluggish market, so now is the ideal time to strengthen your relationship with co-workers, clients, and vendors. And given the proliferation of web-based media and digital communications, it’s easier than ever before. Social networking counts: LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter are there for you to leverage.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  7. Step up to new possibilities: When opportunity knocks, welcome it. Because you’ll be in a better position to gain from opportunities if you’re prepared for them, you should take the time now to beef up your résumé, look for freelance projects, and consider alternate routes for traveling along your career path. Every step you make to empower yourself is a step in the right direction.    (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  8. Stay positive: By keeping a level head and a positive outlook, you are better able to fulfill your responsibilities to your organization. And by projecting optimism and confidence, you will be someone whom other people desire being around.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )

What Do You Want To Do Now?

This is an excellent time to pause and reflect on your career. You may have lost your job recently or anticipate losing your job. If you have secure employment at the moment, you may think it’s nuts to consider a change. As we are now in the era of new beginnings, this truly is an excellent time to pause and reflect on your career.
If you need to find new employment or want to consider a change, ask yourself the following questions: Do you enjoy this field of work? Does it fulfill you? Are you using your talents and abilities? Is it a positive working environment? Does your employer/company conduct business with integrity? Does going to this job everyday drain you or lift you?
Of course we’re not going to like every aspect of our jobs in every moment. Ask these questions and gain and understanding of how you feel overall in your career field and what it is that you want. The energy is new and is ripe for us to create work that is fulfilling, rewarding, uses our talents and allows us to support ourselves.
It may seem daunting to quit everything that you know and go off into something new. If that’s true for you, start small. Begin with figuring out what you love to do and do it as a hobby at first.
For example, if you’d love to make a living at being a writer but are afraid you can’t support yourself doing it, write in your free time. Do creative writing projects, offer to assist friends and family with their projects, volunteer at a nonprofit organization writing newsletters. Who knows… someone may eventually need a writer on staff. A friend may hear of a company who needs a freelance writer for various projects. All of this could add up to doing what you love and being able to support yourself in the process.
Get into a groove of doing this work and of loving what you are doing. The more you do it, the better you will feel. You are fulfilled, using your talents and gifts regularly and creating energy around manifesting more opportunities. You are wide open to possibilities that can allow you to financially support yourself.
See how this works? So, determine one thing that you love to do and start small. Do it as a hobby, as a friend, as a volunteer. Do it often. Stay open to the possibilities and allow opportunities to appear!
So, what do you want to do?

Useful Tips To Recession Proof Your PR Career

Since world slowing turning into recession, companies cutting costs and unemployment rising, it is quite difficult to sustain a career in a company or organization. PR Industry still has the potential to see through recession rein. Here are some very useful tips offered to recession proof your PR Career in this tough recession time:  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )

  1. Stay visible: Your instinct may be to lay low during a recession, but that’s the last thing you should do. In uncertain times, you want to make your presence known by showcasing your value to the organization and being an active team player.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  2. Prepare mentally: Since things can take a turn for the worse without warning, it pays to develop a realistic back-up plan before the situation calls for one.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  3. Make a positive impact on the bottom line: Employers increasingly view their staff as “mini- profit-and-loss centers rather than just as employees,” notes Careerbuilder.com. So, ask yourself how your projects and initiatives are benefiting the company. If they are not contributing in some measurable way, reevaluate your job-preservation strategy.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  4. Perfect your skill set: To boost your market value, keep your skills up to date. Investment in your education, whether its earning a more advanced degree or taking training courses to stay on top of the latest technology and corporate trends, will give you lifelong skills. They will help you do your job better and make you more marketable if you should need or want to switch careers in the future.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  5. Speak up: Talk with your immediate supervisor or other higher-ups if you have any concerns about the future of the company or your career direction. Conversations of this kind reflect a sincere interest in the well-being of the company, as well as your own future. Don’t be afraid to do some independent research and to ask tough questions, such as “what’s being done to safeguard the future of the company and ensure continued success?”  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  6. Network: Studies show that building rapport with past and current colleagues is one of the easiest, yet most often overlooked, ways to stay on the right track. Networking can be especially valuable in a sluggish market, so now is the ideal time to strengthen your relationship with co-workers, clients, and vendors. And given the proliferation of web-based media and digital communications, it’s easier than ever before. Social networking counts: LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter are there for you to leverage.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  7. Step up to new possibilities: When opportunity knocks, welcome it. Because you’ll be in a better position to gain from opportunities if you’re prepared for them, you should take the time now to beef up your résumé, look for freelance projects, and consider alternate routes for traveling along your career path. Every step you make to empower yourself is a step in the right direction.    (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )
  8. Stay positive: By keeping a level head and a positive outlook, you are better able to fulfill your responsibilities to your organization. And by projecting optimism and confidence, you will be someone whom other people desire being around.  (for more computer tips Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com )

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