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Archive for February, 2010

The 10 Most Volatile Careers During A Recession

Recessions tend to be discussed mostly in broad, sweeping, generic terms. Either the recession is a blessing in disguise or, more frequently, an avoidable catastrophe from which you will never recover. In reality, recessions may have a huge impact, moderate impact, or virtually no impact on you depending on your skills, priorities and station in life. The only way to prepare yourself is to know the relevant facts as they relate to you. To that end, BillShrink has researched the 10 most volatile careers to be in during any recession. If you’re in one, tread carefully or consider changing careers. If you’re deciding on a new career, you may want to avoid these!

 

Retail

A common characteristic of virtually all recessions is reduced consumer spending. Clearly, this translates to a slimmer bottom line for those in retail. While there are some exceptions (USA Today names Walmart in a list of recession-proof companies) retailers of all stripes typically suffer their lowest profit margins during recessions and downturns. The volatility of this field is amplified the further down the job ladder you are. For instance, the job security of a minimum wage cashier at a local department store is so close to zero that it might as well be zero. A store manager is on surer footing, but is still a far way off from the stability he or she enjoyed before the recession hit.

 

Construction

It goes without saying that recessions aren’t exactly a zenith of new construction projects. A Google query for “building permits down” returns pages upon pages of news stories about the decline in building in counties all over America, most of them from the last 4-6 months alone. The reason, very simply, is that recessions are perceived as risky times to tie up money in construction projects whose benefits are usually deferred months or years into the future. Rather, most businesses seem to conclude that this money should be held onto in the event of a cash flow crisis or some other unforseen, recession-borne obstacle that will inevitably need to be overcome in the next year or two. These marketwide decisions spell tough times for construction workers, contractors, foremen and other professionals in the building field.

 

Travel

Travel is an industry that lives or dies, in large part, on the vitality of the economy as a whole. When the market tanks, especially for prolonged periods such as recessions, people who would normally part with discretionary income to take a vacation or cruise suddenly cease seeing that income as discretionary. In the haze of recession, no one can be quite certain when the market will turn around. Much as it does with retail, this uncertainty leads many people to cling to money more tightly than they would during prosperous times, when future discretionary income can be assumed. A May 2009 Gallup poll confirms this trend is alive and well in the current recession, finding that over half (52%) of Americans are altering their vacation plans in response to recessionary pressures. All of this is bad news for travel agents (already an endangered profession), hotels, resorts and getaways around the world.

 

Mortgage Lending

The current financial meltdown has hurt mortgage lenders more than other recessions (due to the housing boom and bust), but this is typically a volatile career in all recessions. The middle of an economic collapse is seldom a time when people are eager to buy new homes. First-time home buyers are often willing to buy, current homeowners would have to sell their current home into the same bad market they are trying to benefit from on the buy side, and there are more current homeowners than first-time home buyers. The systemic forces at work here equate to lean times for mortgage lenders, who are left to fend for themselves among such inferior opportunities as exist during extended downturns.

 

Real Estate Sales

The same market forces conspiring to devastate mortgage lenders have similar effects on real estate salespeople. Besides the lopsided ratio of first-time home buyers to current homeowners, there is also the sheer, unavoidable commitment involved in buying a new home. Recessions are characterized by (among other things) fear of losing one’s job, saving less for retirement, and diminished investment performance. Not many people are willing to roll the dice on a new house when all of these variables are in a state of flux, and nationally speaking, there is little a real estate agent can do to change this. It should be noted, however, that this is not universally true of all markets. Certain pockets of the country (like Houston currently) remain a decent place for real estate agents to operate.

 

Entertainment

It’s common knowledge that tobacco and alcohol sell like hotcakes during recessions. Beyond these products, however, the entertainment industry loses some steam during tough economic times. There’s nothing like a huge crash on the Dow or the value of your home halving overnight to make Don’t Mess With The Zohan seem like a frivolous purchase you can do without. Likewise, Hollywood studios tend to hold off on hiring extra stagehands, production crews and extras during a recession. In the same vein, CNN Money reported in May 2009 that video game sales are down 17% compared with just a year ago. While this is partially due to a temporary slowdown in blockbuster game releases, it dovetails with what has historically been a trend during times like these.

 

Marketing

Direct marketing guru Perry Marshall is famous in that industry for remarking on the paradox of what happens to marketing departments during recessions. Conventional wisdom holds that if marketing is how new customers are driven to a business, more money should be devoted to it during lean times. Instead, contrary to that assumption, Marshall notes that marketing is the first department to see budget cuts and downsizing when the market tanks. Regardless of how counter-intuitive this sounds, it has persisted through enough recessions to be recognized as a real trend. If you are a marketer, make sure you are producing visible, demonstrable results for your company. If you are debating getting into the field, make sure you can do the above before committing.

 

Automobile Sales

We’ve already seen how recessions tend to delay major purchases in our discussion of mortgage lenders and real estate salespeople. The same tends to hold true for automobile sales. While the current recession has sank auto sales more than those past, it has been a consistent feature of most recessions in recent memory. The reason, simply enough, is that the car one drives is a foundational piece of most adults’ lives. When everything from their job security to their investment portfolio is up in the air, buying a new car is seldom seen as prudent. Rather, most people who might have bought opt instead to do more maintenance on their current vehicles and/or continue saving their money to buy when the market turns around. As car dealers have painfully learned this time around, even lowering prices to dirt cheap status is often not enough to prevent huge swoons in consumer demand.

 

High-End Clothing

It’s true that people still need to clothe themselves regardless of where the Dow stands. Unfortunately for high-end clothing makers like Abercrombie, consumers tend to economize on the clothes they buy as they do their other purchases. Abercrombie in particular was recently anointed as the “worst recession brand” by Time Magazine for failing to lower its prices at all and consequently suffering 30% drops in sales. Nor has Abercrombie been the only clothing manufacturer to suffer. The green living website TreeHugger reported in March 2009 that clothing swapping was on the rise while new clothing sales were simultaneously falling.

 

Architecture

Just as demand for construction falls with the market, so too does demand for the services of architects. BusinessWeek reported in March 2009 that layoffs were “sweeping the profession” and asked rhetorically “how can architects survive the recession?” The reason, as discussed earlier, is that new building projects tend to be delayed until the economy stabilizes. Because the job of an architect is precisely to design such projects, it goes without saying that their services are not as widely demanded or utilized during such times as these. Exceptions exist in areas that have not been hit has hard or are outside the scope of what caused the recession.

 

 By Billshrink.com

visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or 
visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career 
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and Exams/
Certifications & a lot more

The 10 Most Volatile Careers During A Recession

Recessions tend to be discussed mostly in broad, sweeping, generic terms. Either the recession is a blessing in disguise or, more frequently, an avoidable catastrophe from which you will never recover. In reality, recessions may have a huge impact, moderate impact, or virtually no impact on you depending on your skills, priorities and station in life. The only way to prepare yourself is to know the relevant facts as they relate to you. To that end, BillShrink has researched the 10 most volatile careers to be in during any recession. If you’re in one, tread carefully or consider changing careers. If you’re deciding on a new career, you may want to avoid these!

 

Retail

A common characteristic of virtually all recessions is reduced consumer spending. Clearly, this translates to a slimmer bottom line for those in retail. While there are some exceptions (USA Today names Walmart in a list of recession-proof companies) retailers of all stripes typically suffer their lowest profit margins during recessions and downturns. The volatility of this field is amplified the further down the job ladder you are. For instance, the job security of a minimum wage cashier at a local department store is so close to zero that it might as well be zero. A store manager is on surer footing, but is still a far way off from the stability he or she enjoyed before the recession hit.

 

Construction

It goes without saying that recessions aren’t exactly a zenith of new construction projects. A Google query for “building permits down” returns pages upon pages of news stories about the decline in building in counties all over America, most of them from the last 4-6 months alone. The reason, very simply, is that recessions are perceived as risky times to tie up money in construction projects whose benefits are usually deferred months or years into the future. Rather, most businesses seem to conclude that this money should be held onto in the event of a cash flow crisis or some other unforseen, recession-borne obstacle that will inevitably need to be overcome in the next year or two. These marketwide decisions spell tough times for construction workers, contractors, foremen and other professionals in the building field.

 

Travel

Travel is an industry that lives or dies, in large part, on the vitality of the economy as a whole. When the market tanks, especially for prolonged periods such as recessions, people who would normally part with discretionary income to take a vacation or cruise suddenly cease seeing that income as discretionary. In the haze of recession, no one can be quite certain when the market will turn around. Much as it does with retail, this uncertainty leads many people to cling to money more tightly than they would during prosperous times, when future discretionary income can be assumed. A May 2009 Gallup poll confirms this trend is alive and well in the current recession, finding that over half (52%) of Americans are altering their vacation plans in response to recessionary pressures. All of this is bad news for travel agents (already an endangered profession), hotels, resorts and getaways around the world.

 

Mortgage Lending

The current financial meltdown has hurt mortgage lenders more than other recessions (due to the housing boom and bust), but this is typically a volatile career in all recessions. The middle of an economic collapse is seldom a time when people are eager to buy new homes. First-time home buyers are often willing to buy, current homeowners would have to sell their current home into the same bad market they are trying to benefit from on the buy side, and there are more current homeowners than first-time home buyers. The systemic forces at work here equate to lean times for mortgage lenders, who are left to fend for themselves among such inferior opportunities as exist during extended downturns.

 

Real Estate Sales

The same market forces conspiring to devastate mortgage lenders have similar effects on real estate salespeople. Besides the lopsided ratio of first-time home buyers to current homeowners, there is also the sheer, unavoidable commitment involved in buying a new home. Recessions are characterized by (among other things) fear of losing one’s job, saving less for retirement, and diminished investment performance. Not many people are willing to roll the dice on a new house when all of these variables are in a state of flux, and nationally speaking, there is little a real estate agent can do to change this. It should be noted, however, that this is not universally true of all markets. Certain pockets of the country (like Houston currently) remain a decent place for real estate agents to operate.

 

Entertainment

It’s common knowledge that tobacco and alcohol sell like hotcakes during recessions. Beyond these products, however, the entertainment industry loses some steam during tough economic times. There’s nothing like a huge crash on the Dow or the value of your home halving overnight to make Don’t Mess With The Zohan seem like a frivolous purchase you can do without. Likewise, Hollywood studios tend to hold off on hiring extra stagehands, production crews and extras during a recession. In the same vein, CNN Money reported in May 2009 that video game sales are down 17% compared with just a year ago. While this is partially due to a temporary slowdown in blockbuster game releases, it dovetails with what has historically been a trend during times like these.

 

Marketing

Direct marketing guru Perry Marshall is famous in that industry for remarking on the paradox of what happens to marketing departments during recessions. Conventional wisdom holds that if marketing is how new customers are driven to a business, more money should be devoted to it during lean times. Instead, contrary to that assumption, Marshall notes that marketing is the first department to see budget cuts and downsizing when the market tanks. Regardless of how counter-intuitive this sounds, it has persisted through enough recessions to be recognized as a real trend. If you are a marketer, make sure you are producing visible, demonstrable results for your company. If you are debating getting into the field, make sure you can do the above before committing.

 

Automobile Sales

We’ve already seen how recessions tend to delay major purchases in our discussion of mortgage lenders and real estate salespeople. The same tends to hold true for automobile sales. While the current recession has sank auto sales more than those past, it has been a consistent feature of most recessions in recent memory. The reason, simply enough, is that the car one drives is a foundational piece of most adults’ lives. When everything from their job security to their investment portfolio is up in the air, buying a new car is seldom seen as prudent. Rather, most people who might have bought opt instead to do more maintenance on their current vehicles and/or continue saving their money to buy when the market turns around. As car dealers have painfully learned this time around, even lowering prices to dirt cheap status is often not enough to prevent huge swoons in consumer demand.

 

High-End Clothing

It’s true that people still need to clothe themselves regardless of where the Dow stands. Unfortunately for high-end clothing makers like Abercrombie, consumers tend to economize on the clothes they buy as they do their other purchases. Abercrombie in particular was recently anointed as the “worst recession brand” by Time Magazine for failing to lower its prices at all and consequently suffering 30% drops in sales. Nor has Abercrombie been the only clothing manufacturer to suffer. The green living website TreeHugger reported in March 2009 that clothing swapping was on the rise while new clothing sales were simultaneously falling.

 

Architecture

Just as demand for construction falls with the market, so too does demand for the services of architects. BusinessWeek reported in March 2009 that layoffs were “sweeping the profession” and asked rhetorically “how can architects survive the recession?” The reason, as discussed earlier, is that new building projects tend to be delayed until the economy stabilizes. Because the job of an architect is precisely to design such projects, it goes without saying that their services are not as widely demanded or utilized during such times as these. Exceptions exist in areas that have not been hit has hard or are outside the scope of what caused the recession.

 

 By Billshrink.com

visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or 
visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career 
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and Exams/
Certifications & a lot more

A Collection of the Best Career Networking and Professional Organizations / Associations for WOMEN.

Women’s Career Networking and Professional Associations with all details like mailing addresses, phone nos. emails and direct links to their web sites. This is a special gift working women. Detail is given below:

Networking organizations:
Advancing Women — This International Network for Women in the Workplace highlights issues for the working woman. Includes an online career center, Today’s Women’s News feature, forums for discussion, links for networking with international women, personal services resources and links to similar sites. E-mail:
publisher@advancingwomen.com

BellaOnline — Online resource for women that has career and networking advice, as well as chat areas and discussion forums for online networking.

DinnerGrrls.org — a great networking and mentoring site for women, from all over the world. Includes both online resources and network, as well as local chapters in some U.S. cities. For all women, from college student to CEO. Free to job-seekers.

iVillage.com — Another online women’s resource with career and networking advice, and chat areas and message boards for online networking.

Business Women’s Network (BWN) — Is dedicated to the promotion of business and professional women by providing assistance to corporations, businesswomen’s organizations and state and federal agencies. BWN strives to be the authority on issues affecting businesswomen and the growth of women-owned businesses. Offers searchable online business women’s network directory.

Women’s Professional Organizations:
Selected women’s professional organizations are provided here. To locate professional organizations specifically for women, use the Gateway to Associations Online search engine. This search engine has a pull-down menu that enables you to select “women” as one of the search criteria.

American Association of University Women (AAUW)
1111 16th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-7700
E-mail: info@aauw.org
A national organization that promotes education and equity for all women and girls.

American Business Women’s Association (ABWA)
9100 Ward Pkwy.
Kansas City, MO 64114-0728
Phone: 816-361-6621
E-mail: abwa@abwa.org
Call the ABWA’s national headquarters for local contacts.

American Medical Women’s Association
Suite 400, 801 N. Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-838-0500
E-mail: info@amwa-doc.org
Serves female health professionals.

American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants (AWSCPA)
401 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Phone: 312-664-6610, 800-AWSCPA-1
FAX: 312-527-6783
E-mail: admin@awscpa.org
The American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants is the devoted exclusively to the support and professional development of women CPAs. The society also addresses gender equity, the glass ceiling, work and family issues. To accomplish its mission, AWSCPA offers in-depth support in six important areas, including networking. AWSCPAís Web site has information about meetings and conferences as well as current job opportunities. Some areas of the site are open to members only.

Association for Women in Communications
3337 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-370-7436
Fax: 703-370-7437
E-mail: info@womcom.org
Offers a mentor program and an annual career day.

Association for Women in Computing
Suite 1006, 41 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA, 94104
Phone: 415-905-4663
E-mail: info@awc-hq.org
Serves programmers, analysts, technical writers, and entrepreneurs. Contact the national headquarters for local information.

Association for Women in Development (AWID)
Suite 825, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-0440
E-mail: awid@awid.org
Serves women working on international-development issues.

American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT)
Suite 200, 1650 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA 22102
Phone: 703-506-3290
E-mail: info@awrt.org
Serves women working in electronic media and related fields. Offers job-fax service.

Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
Suite 650, 1200 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-326-8940; 800-886-AWIS
E-mail: awis@awis.org
The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to achieving equity and full participation for women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. AWIS has more than 5,000 members in fields spanning the life and physical sciences, mathematics, social science, and engineering. Events at the 76 local chapters across the country facilitate networking among women scientists at all levels and in all career paths.

Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT)
PO Box 65962
Washington, DC 20035
Phone: 202-785-9842
Monthly events with speakers, periodic seminars on trade topics, and a job bank.

Business and Professional Women USA
1900 M Street NW, Suite 310
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-293-1100
Hosts meetings to discuss issues such as equity, job advancement, and networking.

Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW)
1201 Wakarusa Dr., Ste. C3
Lawrence, KS 66049
Phone: 785-832-1808
For women working in all facets of commercial real estate. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Financial Women International (FWI)
Suite 814, 200 N. Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22203-3128
Phone: 703-807-2007
E-mail: info@fwi.org
Formerly known as the National Association of Bank Women, FWI serves women in banking and financial services.

Federally Employed Women (FEW)
Suite 425, 1400 I St., NW
Washington, DC 20005-2252
Phone: 202-898-0994
E-mail: few@few.org
Serves women in all levels of the federal government, including the military. Also offers a mentor program and seminars on policy and legislative processes.

International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM)
Department of Music
George Washington University, NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-6338
Serves composers, conductors, performers, and music lovers. Provides venues for female artists to perform and helps promote their shows.

National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)
60 East 42nd St., Suite 2700
New York, NY 10165
Phone: 212-351-6400
E-mail: nafe@nafe.com
With some 250,000 members nationwide and abroad, the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) is the nation’s largest businesswomens’ association. NAFE provides resources and services through education, networking, and public advocacy to empower its members to achieve career success and financial security. NAFEís Web site provides information about NAFE, its membership benefits and services, and NAFE networks around the country. It also includes articles and information about business and management, selected articles from NAFE’s Executive Female magazine, and links to business-related sites.

National Association of Insurance Women
1847 E. 15th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 800-766-NAIW
E-mail: National@naiw.org
Provides opportunities for woman in the insurance industry to expand their circle of business contacts and knowledge through association activities such as state meetings, regional conferences and a national convention. Call the national office to locate local chapters.

National Association of Women Business Owners
Suite 1100, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-5322
Leadership training and a network for women who have been in business for themselves for more than eight years.

National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. — This nonprofit, volunteer organization is involved with community service, leadership develop and enhancing career opportunities through networking and programming. For information on NCBW chapters and programs in your area, contact the national headquarters at 212-947-2196, 38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610, New York, New York 10001-3816. E-mail: NC100BW@aol.com.

National Women’s Political Caucus
Suite 425, 1211 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1100
Leadership and campaign-training programs.

Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) — The Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business in international trade by providing networking and educational opportunities. Members include women and men doing business in all facets of international trade including finance, public relations, government, freight forwarding, international law, agriculture, sales and marketing, import/export, logistics, and transportation. Web site contains information about conferences, events, chapters in the United States and around the world, as well as a job bank. E-mail: ewhalley@worldnet.att.net

The Professional Business Women of Illinois (PBWI)
PO Box 151
Crystal Lake, IL 60039
Phone: 847-888-8551
E-mail: info@pbwi.net
PBWI’s mission is to provide a gateway for professional and personal growth through continuing education, community involvement and a network of combined resources.

Society of Women Engineers
120 Wall St.
New York, NY 10005
Phone: 212-509-9577
Contact the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women in Advertising and Marketing
4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 301-369-7400
Monthly networking dinners, speakers bureau, job bank.

Women in Aerospace (WIA)
204 E Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202.547.0229
WIA is dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and increasing their visibility in the aerospace community. Offers networking and professional development opportunities.

Women in Housing and Finance (WHF)
6712 Fisher Ave.
Falls Church VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-5112
E-mail: whf@whfdc.org
Monthly luncheons, a job bank, professional development, and special-interest groups on insurance, securities, technology.

Women in International Security (WIIS)
Center for Peace and Security Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20005-1145
Phone: 202-687-3366
E-mail: info@wiis.org
WIIS (pronounced “wise”) is dedicated to enhancing opportunities for women working in foreign and defense policy. An international, nonprofit, non-partisan network and educational program, WIIS is open to both women and men at all stages of their careers.

Women in Technology International (WITI)
13351 D-Riverside Drive #441
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: 818-788-9484
E-mail: member-info@corp.witi.com
WITI’s mission is to empower women worldwide to achieve unimagined possibilities and transformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.

Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO)
155 East 55th Street, Suite 4-H
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-688-4114
E-mail: info@womenpresidentsorg.com
An organization for women whose businesses annually gross more than $2 million. The organization’s mission states: improving business conditions for women entrepreneurs and promoting the acceptance and advancement of women entrepreneurs in all industries.

Women’s Caucus for the Arts (WCA)
PO Box 1498, Canal St. Station
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 212-634-0007
Has established a national network through research, exhibitions, conferences and honor awards for achievement. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women’s Information Network (WIN)
Suite 635, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-2827
A Democratic group that serves mostly younger women. It features a job center and a well-reputed networking event, “Women Opening Doors for Women,” in which high-level professional women share their experiences at informal dinner parties.

Women’s National Book Association (WNBA)
3101 Ravensworth Pl.
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703-578-4023
Serves women in publishing, writing, and editing, as well as those who have an interest in books. Offers professional-development programs.

By Quint Careers

visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or visit
<http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and
Exams/Certifications & a lot more

A Collection of the Best Career Networking and Professional Organizations / Associations for WOMEN.

Women’s Career Networking and Professional Associations with all details like mailing addresses, phone nos. emails and direct links to their web sites. This is a special gift working women. Detail is given below:
Networking organizations:
 Advancing Women — This International Network for Women in the Workplace highlights issues for the working woman. Includes an online career center, Today’s Women’s News feature, forums for discussion, links for networking with international women, personal services resources and links to similar sites. E-mail:  
BellaOnline — Online resource for women that has career and networking advice, as well as chat areas and discussion forums for online networking.
DinnerGrrls.org — a great networking and mentoring site for women, from all over the world. Includes both online resources and network, as well as local chapters in some U.S. cities. For all women, from college student to CEO. Free to job-seekers.

iVillage.com — Another online women’s resource with career and networking advice, and chat areas and message boards for online networking.
Business Women’s Network (BWN) — Is dedicated to the promotion of business and professional women by providing assistance to corporations, businesswomen’s organizations and state and federal agencies. BWN strives to be the authority on issues affecting businesswomen and the growth of women-owned businesses. Offers searchable online business women’s network directory.
Women’s Professional Organizations:
Selected women’s professional organizations are provided here. To locate professional organizations specifically for women, use the Gateway to Associations Online search engine. This search engine has a pull-down menu that enables you to select “women” as one of the search criteria.
American Association of University Women (AAUW)
1111 16th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-7700
E-mail: info@aauw.org
A national organization that promotes education and equity for all women and girls.
American Business Women’s Association (ABWA)
9100 Ward Pkwy.
Kansas City, MO 64114-0728
Phone: 816-361-6621
E-mail: abwa@abwa.org
Call the ABWA’s national headquarters for local contacts.
American Medical Women’s Association
Suite 400, 801 N. Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-838-0500
E-mail: info@amwa-doc.org
Serves female health professionals.
American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants (AWSCPA)
401 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Phone: 312-664-6610, 800-AWSCPA-1
FAX: 312-527-6783
E-mail: admin@awscpa.org
The American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants is the devoted exclusively to the support and professional development of women CPAs. The society also addresses gender equity, the glass ceiling, work and family issues. To accomplish its mission, AWSCPA offers in-depth support in six important areas, including networking. AWSCPAís Web site has information about meetings and conferences as well as current job opportunities. Some areas of the site are open to members only.
Association for Women in Communications
3337 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-370-7436
Fax: 703-370-7437
E-mail: info@womcom.org
Offers a mentor program and an annual career day.
Association for Women in Computing
Suite 1006, 41 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA, 94104
Phone: 415-905-4663
E-mail: info@awc-hq.org
Serves programmers, analysts, technical writers, and entrepreneurs. Contact the national headquarters for local information.
Association for Women in Development (AWID)
Suite 825, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-0440
E-mail: awid@awid.org
Serves women working on international-development issues.
American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT)
Suite 200, 1650 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA  22102
Phone: 703-506-3290
E-mail: info@awrt.org
Serves women working in electronic media and related fields. Offers job-fax service.
Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
Suite 650, 1200 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-326-8940; 800-886-AWIS
E-mail: awis@awis.org
The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to achieving equity and full participation for women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. AWIS has more than 5,000 members in fields spanning the life and physical sciences, mathematics, social science, and engineering. Events at the 76 local chapters across the country facilitate networking among women scientists at all levels and in all career paths.
Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT)
PO Box 65962
Washington, DC 20035
Phone: 202-785-9842
Monthly events with speakers, periodic seminars on trade topics, and a job bank.
Business and Professional Women USA
1900 M Street NW, Suite 310
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-293-1100
Hosts meetings to discuss issues such as equity, job advancement, and networking.
Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW)
1201 Wakarusa Dr., Ste. C3
Lawrence, KS 66049
Phone: 785-832-1808
For women working in all facets of commercial real estate. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.
Financial Women International (FWI)
Suite 814, 200 N. Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22203-3128
Phone: 703-807-2007
E-mail: info@fwi.org
Formerly known as the National Association of Bank Women, FWI serves women in banking and financial services.
Federally Employed Women (FEW)
Suite 425, 1400 I St., NW
Washington, DC 20005-2252
Phone: 202-898-0994
E-mail: few@few.org
Serves women in all levels of the federal government, including the military. Also offers a mentor program and seminars on policy and legislative processes.
International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM)
Department of Music
George Washington University, NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-6338
Serves composers, conductors, performers, and music lovers. Provides venues for female artists to perform and helps promote their shows.
National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)
60 East 42nd St., Suite 2700
New York, NY 10165
Phone: 212-351-6400
E-mail: nafe@nafe.com
With some 250,000 members nationwide and abroad, the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) is the nation’s largest businesswomens’ association. NAFE provides resources and services through education, networking, and public advocacy to empower its members to achieve career success and financial security. NAFEís Web site provides information about NAFE, its membership benefits and services, and NAFE networks around the country. It also includes articles and information about business and management, selected articles from NAFE’s Executive Female magazine, and links to business-related sites.
National Association of Insurance Women
1847 E. 15th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 800-766-NAIW
E-mail: National@naiw.org
Provides opportunities for woman in the insurance industry to expand their circle of business contacts and knowledge through association activities such as state meetings, regional conferences and a national convention. Call the national office to locate local chapters.
National Association of Women Business Owners
Suite 1100, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-5322
Leadership training and a network for women who have been in business for themselves for more than eight years.
National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. — This nonprofit, volunteer organization is involved with community service, leadership develop and enhancing career opportunities through networking and programming. For information on NCBW chapters and programs in your area, contact the national headquarters at 212-947-2196, 38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610, New York, New York 10001-3816. E-mail: NC100BW@aol.com.
National Women’s Political Caucus
Suite 425, 1211 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1100
Leadership and campaign-training programs.
Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) — The Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business in international trade by providing networking and educational opportunities. Members include women and men doing business in all facets of international trade including finance, public relations, government, freight forwarding, international law, agriculture, sales and marketing, import/export, logistics, and transportation. Web site contains information about conferences, events, chapters in the United States and around the world, as well as a job bank. E-mail: ewhalley@worldnet.att.net
The Professional Business Women of Illinois (PBWI)
PO Box 151
Crystal Lake, IL 60039
Phone: 847-888-8551
E-mail: info@pbwi.net
PBWI’s mission is to provide a gateway for professional and personal growth through continuing education, community involvement and a network of combined resources.
Society of Women Engineers
120 Wall St.
New York, NY 10005
Phone: 212-509-9577
Contact the national headquarters for local contacts.
Women in Advertising and Marketing
4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 301-369-7400
Monthly networking dinners, speakers bureau, job bank.
Women in Aerospace (WIA)
204 E Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202.547.0229
WIA is dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and increasing their visibility in the aerospace community. Offers networking and professional development opportunities.
Women in Housing and Finance (WHF)
6712 Fisher Ave.
Falls Church VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-5112
E-mail: whf@whfdc.org
Monthly luncheons, a job bank, professional development, and special-interest groups on insurance, securities, technology.
Women in International Security (WIIS)
Center for Peace and Security Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20005-1145
Phone: 202-687-3366
E-mail: info@wiis.org
WIIS (pronounced “wise”) is dedicated to enhancing opportunities for women working in foreign and defense policy. An international, nonprofit, non-partisan network and educational program, WIIS is open to both women and men at all stages of their careers.
Women in Technology International (WITI)
13351 D-Riverside Drive #441
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: 818-788-9484
E-mail: member-info@corp.witi.com
WITI’s mission is to empower women worldwide to achieve unimagined possibilities and transformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.
Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO)
155 East 55th Street, Suite 4-H
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-688-4114
E-mail: info@womenpresidentsorg.com
An organization for women whose businesses annually gross more than $2 million. The organization’s mission states: improving business conditions for women entrepreneurs and promoting the acceptance and advancement of women entrepreneurs in all industries.
Women’s Caucus for the Arts (WCA)
PO Box 1498, Canal St. Station
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 212-634-0007
Has established a national network through research, exhibitions, conferences and honor awards for achievement. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.
Women’s Information Network (WIN)
Suite 635, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-2827
A Democratic group that serves mostly younger women. It features a job center and a well-reputed networking event, “Women Opening Doors for Women,” in which high-level professional women share their experiences at informal dinner parties.
Women’s National Book Association (WNBA)
3101 Ravensworth Pl.
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703-578-4023
Serves women in publishing, writing, and editing, as well as those who have an interest in books. Offers professional-development programs.
 
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or visit
<http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career 
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more

A Collection of the Best Career Networking and Professional Organizations / Associations for WOMEN.

Women’s Career Networking and Professional Associations with all details like mailing addresses, phone nos. emails and direct links to their web sites. This is a special gift working women. Detail is given below:

Networking organizations:
Advancing Women — This International Network for Women in the Workplace highlights issues for the working woman. Includes an online career center, Today’s Women’s News feature, forums for discussion, links for networking with international women, personal services resources and links to similar sites. E-mail:
publisher@advancingwomen.com

BellaOnline — Online resource for women that has career and networking advice, as well as chat areas and discussion forums for online networking.

DinnerGrrls.org — a great networking and mentoring site for women, from all over the world. Includes both online resources and network, as well as local chapters in some U.S. cities. For all women, from college student to CEO. Free to job-seekers.

iVillage.com — Another online women’s resource with career and networking advice, and chat areas and message boards for online networking.

Business Women’s Network (BWN) — Is dedicated to the promotion of business and professional women by providing assistance to corporations, businesswomen’s organizations and state and federal agencies. BWN strives to be the authority on issues affecting businesswomen and the growth of women-owned businesses. Offers searchable online business women’s network directory.

Women’s Professional Organizations:
Selected women’s professional organizations are provided here. To locate professional organizations specifically for women, use the Gateway to Associations Online search engine. This search engine has a pull-down menu that enables you to select “women” as one of the search criteria.

American Association of University Women (AAUW)
1111 16th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-7700
E-mail: info@aauw.org
A national organization that promotes education and equity for all women and girls.

American Business Women’s Association (ABWA)
9100 Ward Pkwy.
Kansas City, MO 64114-0728
Phone: 816-361-6621
E-mail: abwa@abwa.org
Call the ABWA’s national headquarters for local contacts.

American Medical Women’s Association
Suite 400, 801 N. Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-838-0500
E-mail: info@amwa-doc.org
Serves female health professionals.

American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants (AWSCPA)
401 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Phone: 312-664-6610, 800-AWSCPA-1
FAX: 312-527-6783
E-mail: admin@awscpa.org
The American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants is the devoted exclusively to the support and professional development of women CPAs. The society also addresses gender equity, the glass ceiling, work and family issues. To accomplish its mission, AWSCPA offers in-depth support in six important areas, including networking. AWSCPAís Web site has information about meetings and conferences as well as current job opportunities. Some areas of the site are open to members only.

Association for Women in Communications
3337 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-370-7436
Fax: 703-370-7437
E-mail: info@womcom.org
Offers a mentor program and an annual career day.

Association for Women in Computing
Suite 1006, 41 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA, 94104
Phone: 415-905-4663
E-mail: info@awc-hq.org
Serves programmers, analysts, technical writers, and entrepreneurs. Contact the national headquarters for local information.

Association for Women in Development (AWID)
Suite 825, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-0440
E-mail: awid@awid.org
Serves women working on international-development issues.

American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT)
Suite 200, 1650 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA 22102
Phone: 703-506-3290
E-mail: info@awrt.org
Serves women working in electronic media and related fields. Offers job-fax service.

Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
Suite 650, 1200 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-326-8940; 800-886-AWIS
E-mail: awis@awis.org
The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to achieving equity and full participation for women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. AWIS has more than 5,000 members in fields spanning the life and physical sciences, mathematics, social science, and engineering. Events at the 76 local chapters across the country facilitate networking among women scientists at all levels and in all career paths.

Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT)
PO Box 65962
Washington, DC 20035
Phone: 202-785-9842
Monthly events with speakers, periodic seminars on trade topics, and a job bank.

Business and Professional Women USA
1900 M Street NW, Suite 310
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-293-1100
Hosts meetings to discuss issues such as equity, job advancement, and networking.

Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW)
1201 Wakarusa Dr., Ste. C3
Lawrence, KS 66049
Phone: 785-832-1808
For women working in all facets of commercial real estate. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Financial Women International (FWI)
Suite 814, 200 N. Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22203-3128
Phone: 703-807-2007
E-mail: info@fwi.org
Formerly known as the National Association of Bank Women, FWI serves women in banking and financial services.

Federally Employed Women (FEW)
Suite 425, 1400 I St., NW
Washington, DC 20005-2252
Phone: 202-898-0994
E-mail: few@few.org
Serves women in all levels of the federal government, including the military. Also offers a mentor program and seminars on policy and legislative processes.

International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM)
Department of Music
George Washington University, NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-6338
Serves composers, conductors, performers, and music lovers. Provides venues for female artists to perform and helps promote their shows.

National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)
60 East 42nd St., Suite 2700
New York, NY 10165
Phone: 212-351-6400
E-mail: nafe@nafe.com
With some 250,000 members nationwide and abroad, the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) is the nation’s largest businesswomens’ association. NAFE provides resources and services through education, networking, and public advocacy to empower its members to achieve career success and financial security. NAFEís Web site provides information about NAFE, its membership benefits and services, and NAFE networks around the country. It also includes articles and information about business and management, selected articles from NAFE’s Executive Female magazine, and links to business-related sites.

National Association of Insurance Women
1847 E. 15th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 800-766-NAIW
E-mail: National@naiw.org
Provides opportunities for woman in the insurance industry to expand their circle of business contacts and knowledge through association activities such as state meetings, regional conferences and a national convention. Call the national office to locate local chapters.

National Association of Women Business Owners
Suite 1100, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-5322
Leadership training and a network for women who have been in business for themselves for more than eight years.

National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. — This nonprofit, volunteer organization is involved with community service, leadership develop and enhancing career opportunities through networking and programming. For information on NCBW chapters and programs in your area, contact the national headquarters at 212-947-2196, 38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610, New York, New York 10001-3816. E-mail: NC100BW@aol.com.

National Women’s Political Caucus
Suite 425, 1211 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1100
Leadership and campaign-training programs.

Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) — The Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business in international trade by providing networking and educational opportunities. Members include women and men doing business in all facets of international trade including finance, public relations, government, freight forwarding, international law, agriculture, sales and marketing, import/export, logistics, and transportation. Web site contains information about conferences, events, chapters in the United States and around the world, as well as a job bank. E-mail: ewhalley@worldnet.att.net

The Professional Business Women of Illinois (PBWI)
PO Box 151
Crystal Lake, IL 60039
Phone: 847-888-8551
E-mail: info@pbwi.net
PBWI’s mission is to provide a gateway for professional and personal growth through continuing education, community involvement and a network of combined resources.

Society of Women Engineers
120 Wall St.
New York, NY 10005
Phone: 212-509-9577
Contact the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women in Advertising and Marketing
4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 301-369-7400
Monthly networking dinners, speakers bureau, job bank.

Women in Aerospace (WIA)
204 E Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202.547.0229
WIA is dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and increasing their visibility in the aerospace community. Offers networking and professional development opportunities.

Women in Housing and Finance (WHF)
6712 Fisher Ave.
Falls Church VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-5112
E-mail: whf@whfdc.org
Monthly luncheons, a job bank, professional development, and special-interest groups on insurance, securities, technology.

Women in International Security (WIIS)
Center for Peace and Security Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20005-1145
Phone: 202-687-3366
E-mail: info@wiis.org
WIIS (pronounced “wise”) is dedicated to enhancing opportunities for women working in foreign and defense policy. An international, nonprofit, non-partisan network and educational program, WIIS is open to both women and men at all stages of their careers.

Women in Technology International (WITI)
13351 D-Riverside Drive #441
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: 818-788-9484
E-mail: member-info@corp.witi.com
WITI’s mission is to empower women worldwide to achieve unimagined possibilities and transformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.

Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO)
155 East 55th Street, Suite 4-H
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-688-4114
E-mail: info@womenpresidentsorg.com
An organization for women whose businesses annually gross more than $2 million. The organization’s mission states: improving business conditions for women entrepreneurs and promoting the acceptance and advancement of women entrepreneurs in all industries.

Women’s Caucus for the Arts (WCA)
PO Box 1498, Canal St. Station
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 212-634-0007
Has established a national network through research, exhibitions, conferences and honor awards for achievement. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women’s Information Network (WIN)
Suite 635, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-2827
A Democratic group that serves mostly younger women. It features a job center and a well-reputed networking event, “Women Opening Doors for Women,” in which high-level professional women share their experiences at informal dinner parties.

Women’s National Book Association (WNBA)
3101 Ravensworth Pl.
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703-578-4023
Serves women in publishing, writing, and editing, as well as those who have an interest in books. Offers professional-development programs.

By Quint Careers

visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or visit
<http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and
Exams/Certifications & a lot more

A Collection of the Best Career Networking and Professional Organizations / Associations for WOMEN.

Women’s Career Networking and Professional Associations with all details like mailing addresses, phone nos. emails and direct links to their web sites. This is a special gift working women. Detail is given below:
Networking organizations:
 Advancing Women — This International Network for Women in the Workplace highlights issues for the working woman. Includes an online career center, Today’s Women’s News feature, forums for discussion, links for networking with international women, personal services resources and links to similar sites. E-mail:  
BellaOnline — Online resource for women that has career and networking advice, as well as chat areas and discussion forums for online networking.
DinnerGrrls.org — a great networking and mentoring site for women, from all over the world. Includes both online resources and network, as well as local chapters in some U.S. cities. For all women, from college student to CEO. Free to job-seekers.

iVillage.com — Another online women’s resource with career and networking advice, and chat areas and message boards for online networking.
Business Women’s Network (BWN) — Is dedicated to the promotion of business and professional women by providing assistance to corporations, businesswomen’s organizations and state and federal agencies. BWN strives to be the authority on issues affecting businesswomen and the growth of women-owned businesses. Offers searchable online business women’s network directory.
Women’s Professional Organizations:
Selected women’s professional organizations are provided here. To locate professional organizations specifically for women, use the Gateway to Associations Online search engine. This search engine has a pull-down menu that enables you to select “women” as one of the search criteria.
American Association of University Women (AAUW)
1111 16th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-7700
E-mail: info@aauw.org
A national organization that promotes education and equity for all women and girls.
American Business Women’s Association (ABWA)
9100 Ward Pkwy.
Kansas City, MO 64114-0728
Phone: 816-361-6621
E-mail: abwa@abwa.org
Call the ABWA’s national headquarters for local contacts.
American Medical Women’s Association
Suite 400, 801 N. Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-838-0500
E-mail: info@amwa-doc.org
Serves female health professionals.
American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants (AWSCPA)
401 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Phone: 312-664-6610, 800-AWSCPA-1
FAX: 312-527-6783
E-mail: admin@awscpa.org
The American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants is the devoted exclusively to the support and professional development of women CPAs. The society also addresses gender equity, the glass ceiling, work and family issues. To accomplish its mission, AWSCPA offers in-depth support in six important areas, including networking. AWSCPAís Web site has information about meetings and conferences as well as current job opportunities. Some areas of the site are open to members only.
Association for Women in Communications
3337 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-370-7436
Fax: 703-370-7437
E-mail: info@womcom.org
Offers a mentor program and an annual career day.
Association for Women in Computing
Suite 1006, 41 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA, 94104
Phone: 415-905-4663
E-mail: info@awc-hq.org
Serves programmers, analysts, technical writers, and entrepreneurs. Contact the national headquarters for local information.
Association for Women in Development (AWID)
Suite 825, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-0440
E-mail: awid@awid.org
Serves women working on international-development issues.
American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT)
Suite 200, 1650 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA  22102
Phone: 703-506-3290
E-mail: info@awrt.org
Serves women working in electronic media and related fields. Offers job-fax service.
Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
Suite 650, 1200 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-326-8940; 800-886-AWIS
E-mail: awis@awis.org
The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to achieving equity and full participation for women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. AWIS has more than 5,000 members in fields spanning the life and physical sciences, mathematics, social science, and engineering. Events at the 76 local chapters across the country facilitate networking among women scientists at all levels and in all career paths.
Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT)
PO Box 65962
Washington, DC 20035
Phone: 202-785-9842
Monthly events with speakers, periodic seminars on trade topics, and a job bank.
Business and Professional Women USA
1900 M Street NW, Suite 310
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-293-1100
Hosts meetings to discuss issues such as equity, job advancement, and networking.
Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW)
1201 Wakarusa Dr., Ste. C3
Lawrence, KS 66049
Phone: 785-832-1808
For women working in all facets of commercial real estate. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.
Financial Women International (FWI)
Suite 814, 200 N. Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22203-3128
Phone: 703-807-2007
E-mail: info@fwi.org
Formerly known as the National Association of Bank Women, FWI serves women in banking and financial services.
Federally Employed Women (FEW)
Suite 425, 1400 I St., NW
Washington, DC 20005-2252
Phone: 202-898-0994
E-mail: few@few.org
Serves women in all levels of the federal government, including the military. Also offers a mentor program and seminars on policy and legislative processes.
International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM)
Department of Music
George Washington University, NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-6338
Serves composers, conductors, performers, and music lovers. Provides venues for female artists to perform and helps promote their shows.
National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)
60 East 42nd St., Suite 2700
New York, NY 10165
Phone: 212-351-6400
E-mail: nafe@nafe.com
With some 250,000 members nationwide and abroad, the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) is the nation’s largest businesswomens’ association. NAFE provides resources and services through education, networking, and public advocacy to empower its members to achieve career success and financial security. NAFEís Web site provides information about NAFE, its membership benefits and services, and NAFE networks around the country. It also includes articles and information about business and management, selected articles from NAFE’s Executive Female magazine, and links to business-related sites.
National Association of Insurance Women
1847 E. 15th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 800-766-NAIW
E-mail: National@naiw.org
Provides opportunities for woman in the insurance industry to expand their circle of business contacts and knowledge through association activities such as state meetings, regional conferences and a national convention. Call the national office to locate local chapters.
National Association of Women Business Owners
Suite 1100, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-5322
Leadership training and a network for women who have been in business for themselves for more than eight years.
National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. — This nonprofit, volunteer organization is involved with community service, leadership develop and enhancing career opportunities through networking and programming. For information on NCBW chapters and programs in your area, contact the national headquarters at 212-947-2196, 38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610, New York, New York 10001-3816. E-mail: NC100BW@aol.com.
National Women’s Political Caucus
Suite 425, 1211 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1100
Leadership and campaign-training programs.
Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) — The Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business in international trade by providing networking and educational opportunities. Members include women and men doing business in all facets of international trade including finance, public relations, government, freight forwarding, international law, agriculture, sales and marketing, import/export, logistics, and transportation. Web site contains information about conferences, events, chapters in the United States and around the world, as well as a job bank. E-mail: ewhalley@worldnet.att.net
The Professional Business Women of Illinois (PBWI)
PO Box 151
Crystal Lake, IL 60039
Phone: 847-888-8551
E-mail: info@pbwi.net
PBWI’s mission is to provide a gateway for professional and personal growth through continuing education, community involvement and a network of combined resources.
Society of Women Engineers
120 Wall St.
New York, NY 10005
Phone: 212-509-9577
Contact the national headquarters for local contacts.
Women in Advertising and Marketing
4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 301-369-7400
Monthly networking dinners, speakers bureau, job bank.
Women in Aerospace (WIA)
204 E Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202.547.0229
WIA is dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and increasing their visibility in the aerospace community. Offers networking and professional development opportunities.
Women in Housing and Finance (WHF)
6712 Fisher Ave.
Falls Church VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-5112
E-mail: whf@whfdc.org
Monthly luncheons, a job bank, professional development, and special-interest groups on insurance, securities, technology.
Women in International Security (WIIS)
Center for Peace and Security Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20005-1145
Phone: 202-687-3366
E-mail: info@wiis.org
WIIS (pronounced “wise”) is dedicated to enhancing opportunities for women working in foreign and defense policy. An international, nonprofit, non-partisan network and educational program, WIIS is open to both women and men at all stages of their careers.
Women in Technology International (WITI)
13351 D-Riverside Drive #441
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: 818-788-9484
E-mail: member-info@corp.witi.com
WITI’s mission is to empower women worldwide to achieve unimagined possibilities and tr
ansformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.
Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO)
155 East 55th Street, Suite 4-H
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-688-4114
E-mail: info@womenpresidentsorg.com
An organization for women whose businesses annually gross more than $2 million. The organization’s mission states: improving business conditions for women entrepreneurs and promoting the acceptance and advancement of women entrepreneurs in all industries.
Women’s Caucus for the Arts (WCA)
PO Box 1498, Canal St. Station
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 212-634-0007
Has established a national network through research, exhibitions, conferences and honor awards for achievement. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.
Women’s Information Network (WIN)
Suite 635, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-2827
A Democratic group that serves mostly younger women. It features a job center and a well-reputed networking event, “Women Opening Doors for Women,” in which high-level professional women share their experiences at informal dinner parties.
Women’s National Book Association (WNBA)
3101 Ravensworth Pl.
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703-578-4023
Serves women in publishing, writing, and editing, as well as those who have an interest in books. Offers professional-development programs.
 
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm or visit
<http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for Career 
Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more

Is Your Dream Job Really Out There?

What is your dream job? Lying on the beach in some tropical paradise while a generous paycheck is automatically deposited into your account? Well now that’s just pure fantasy. Having a dream job doesn’t necessarily mean not working hard. But it may not be as elusive as you think.

So what makes a job a dream? It generally embodies one or more elements that makes doing your job easier or better and can mean different things to different people. Here are some qualities to look for to help you find your dream job.

Follow Your Dream
Some people are lucky enough to work in a profession that actually follows their lifelong desire. Have you always wanted to help people? Your dream job could be working for a social service organization or hospital. Always had a flair for the dramatic? Join up with a local theater troupe. George loved architecture and photography since he was little. He’s now a successful photographer known for capturing the perfect angle of some of the most spectacular buildings in the world.

Variety
A dream job has built-in diversity. You don’t want to have to perform the same repetitive actions all day, every day. Instead, you want a variety of tasks to keep your mind sharp and keep you interested. Look for a job with a consulting firm where you are always taking on new projects for different clients.

Work/Life Balance
For Tracey, an underwriter for a national insurance company, it means telecommuting. As a new mom, the option to telecommute meant that she was able to return to work after having her baby without leaving home. “The time I save commuting means more time with my beautiful new daughter.” It also eliminates the stress of rushing out of the house to drop the kids off at daycare and get to work on time.

A Place to Grow
A true dream job would be one in which your position, responsibilities and salary grew with you. You would never be forced to look elsewhere to find fulfillment in your profession. Look for companies that are committed to helping employees further their careers through educational opportunities and internal promotion policies.

Using Vacation Time is Applauded
For Dan, a senior project manger for a national permitting company, it means adhering to a strictly enforced policy on using vacation time. Employees are strongly encouraged to use their vacation time. “In such a deadline-driven industry, taking time off is necessary to relieve stress.”

Part-time Flexibility
For Joan, a retired professional who now works part-time for a local retail store, “getting paid basically to shop all day (even if it’s helping someone else buy their clothes) is a dream come true for me.” And the part-time hours are just enough to keep her busy, without interfering with her much anticipated lunch dates with her husband or visits with her precious grandchildren.

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