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Archive for March, 2010

Keys to Passive Salary Negotiation For Job-Seekers Who Don’t Like Negotiating

Passive negotiating. So you’re not one who enjoys conflict? In fact you avoid confrontation of any kind? You don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings or take advantage of anyone. You’re a giver — not so good at receiving? You’re a helper, not so good at being helped?
Here’s the two things you can do that will not create the dreaded possibility of tension and disapproval, but give you a chance to add dollars to your paychecks.
Some negotiations require action on your part. Documenting, comparing, estimating, promising, etc. Other things are more passive. you want the least amount of negotiating besides saying “OK” (which is simply no negotiation at all!) consider these two passive techniques.
1. Be quiet when it’s time to be quiet. You can still be an agreeable person, just don’t agree right away! Use “The Flinch.” When it comes time — and it will come time to do this no matter how nice you are — to talk money, simply let them talk. You don’t need to break in; don’t need to counter offer; don’t need to do anything proactive, or even reactive: just be quiet. When you hear their offer, repeat it and say “Hmmm.” Think about it. You will probably get a raise on the spot.
2. Ask “What’s the best you can do?” You don’t need to argue, present your evidence, make a case, etc. You don’t need to say “no” to the offer you received or re-negotiate terms or cover fine pits. You don’t need to demand more money or even ask for more money. You won’t push them outside their comfort zone. Simply say, “Wow, thanks for your offer. I look forward to starting. And I’m not a very good negotiator, so I prefer to leave this up to you — I trust you’ll tell me the truth. What’s the best you can do?
There, that’s not so hard, is it? Have fun!
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm 
or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for 
Career Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more …. 

Keys to Passive Salary Negotiation For Job-Seekers Who Don't Like Negotiating

Passive negotiating. So you’re not one who enjoys conflict? In fact you avoid confrontation of any kind? You don’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings or take advantage of anyone. You’re a giver — not so good at receiving? You’re a helper, not so good at being helped?
Here’s the two things you can do that will not create the dreaded possibility of tension and disapproval, but give you a chance to add dollars to your paychecks.
Some negotiations require action on your part. Documenting, comparing, estimating, promising, etc. Other things are more passive. you want the least amount of negotiating besides saying “OK” (which is simply no negotiation at all!) consider these two passive techniques.
1. Be quiet when it’s time to be quiet. You can still be an agreeable person, just don’t agree right away! Use “The Flinch.” When it comes time — and it will come time to do this no matter how nice you are — to talk money, simply let them talk. You don’t need to break in; don’t need to counter offer; don’t need to do anything proactive, or even reactive: just be quiet. When you hear their offer, repeat it and say “Hmmm.” Think about it. You will probably get a raise on the spot.
2. Ask “What’s the best you can do?” You don’t need to argue, present your evidence, make a case, etc. You don’t need to say “no” to the offer you received or re-negotiate terms or cover fine pits. You don’t need to demand more money or even ask for more money. You won’t push them outside their comfort zone. Simply say, “Wow, thanks for your offer. I look forward to starting. And I’m not a very good negotiator, so I prefer to leave this up to you — I trust you’ll tell me the truth. What’s the best you can do?
There, that’s not so hard, is it? Have fun!
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm 
or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for 
Career Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more …. 

A Job-Seeker’s Guide to Successfully Completing Job Applications

Hello Friends,
New to job-hunting? This article is designed to provide you with the critical information you need to successfully complete a job application. Should filling out an application be a stressful event? No. If you have a resume, you should have just about all the information you need. If you don’t have a resume, now might be the time to create one.
When are job applications used by employers? For many part-time, entry-level, and blue collar jobs, employers use applications to screen potential employees; they use the information from the applications to determine who they are going to call for a job interview. For other types of jobs, applications are simply the paperwork the Human Resources department requires of all job applicants; employers often ask you to complete an application after they have invited you for an interview.
Why do employers use job applications? Many employers use applications as a way of standardizing the information they obtain from all job-seekers, including some things that you would not normally put on your resume. Your goal is to complete the application as completely and honestly as you can all the time remembering that the application is a key marketing tool for you in the job-hunting process. Remember that some employers will use your application as a basis for deciding whether to call you for an interview.
So, armed with this knowledge, here are the ins and outs of completing job applications.
Arrive prepared with the information you need. Be sure to bring your resume, social security card, driver’s license, etc. You probably will also need addresses and phone numbers of previous employers, as well as starting and ending salaries for each previous job. It’s always better if have too much information than not enough.
Read and follow instructions carefully. Always take a few minutes to review the entire application. Some applications ask for information differently and all have specific spaces in which you are expected to answer questions. Think of the application as your first test in following instructions.
Complete the application as neatly as possible. Remember how important handwriting was in school? Neatness and legibility count; the application is a reflection of you. Consider typing it if you have access to a typewriter. If completing it by hand, be sure to use only a blue or black pen and consider using an erasable pen or taking some “white-out” to fix minor mistakes. Don’t fold, bend, or otherwise mar the application.
Tailor your answers to the job you are seeking. Just as with your resume and cover letter, you want to focus your education and experience to the job at hand. Give details of skills and accomplishments, and avoid framing your experiences in terms of mere duties and responsibilities. Show why you are more qualified than other applicants for the position. Include experience from all sources, including previous jobs, school, clubs and organizations, and volunteer work.
Don’t leave any blanks. One of the reasons employers have you complete an application is because they want the same information from all job applicants. However, if there are questions that do not apply to you, simply respond with “not applicable,” or “n/a.” Do not write “see resume” when completing the application (but you can certainly attach your resume to the application).
Don’t provide any negative information. As with any job search correspondence, never offer negative information. Your goal with the application is to get an interview. Providing negative information (such as being fired from a job) just gives the employer a reason not to interview you.
Always answer questions truthfully. The fastest way for an application to hit the trash can is to have a lie on it, but that doesn’t mean you need to give complete answers either. For example, many applications ask your reason for leaving your last job. If you were fired or downsized, you should try to be as positive as possible and leave longer explanations for the interview; some experts recommend writing “job ended” as the reason you left your last job.
Do not put specific salary requirements. It is way too early in the job-seeking process to allow yourself to be identified by a specific salary request. You don’t want to give employers too much information too soon. In addition, employers often use this question as a screening device and you don’t want to be eliminated from consideration based on your answer. It’s best to say “open” or “negotiable.” You can find lots more information about all aspects of salary and benefits by going to our Salary Negotiation Tips.
Provide references. Employers want to see that there are people who will provide objective information about you to them. Pick your references carefully and make sure you ask if they are willing to be a reference for you before you list them. Where do you get references? From past employers, to teachers, to family friends. Most young job-seekers have a mix of professional and character references, while more experienced job-seekers focus on professional references who can speak of your skills and accomplishments.
Keep your application consistent with your resume. Make sure all dates, names, titles, etc., on your application coincide with the information on your resume. Don’t worry if the application is based on chronological employment while you have a functional resume. Don’t know the difference between the two types of resumes?
Proofread your application before submitting it. Once you’ve completed the application, sit back and take a moment to thoroughly proofread the document, checking for all errors especially typos and misspellings.
One final word. Be prepared for all kinds of job applications, from simple one-page applications to multi-page applications; and some will be clean and crisp copies while others will appear to be photocopied a few too many times. Regardless, take your time and do the best you can, always keeping in the back of your mind the goal of the application getting you an interview.
If you have not heard from the employer within a week of submitting your application, you should follow-up with the employer. There’s truth to the “squeaky wheel” cliché. Ask for an interview and ask to have your application kept on file.
For 20,000 computer tips n tricks. visit … http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com

A Job-Seeker's Guide to Successfully Completing Job Applications

Hello Friends,
New to job-hunting? This article is designed to provide you with the critical information you need to successfully complete a job application. Should filling out an application be a stressful event? No. If you have a resume, you should have just about all the information you need. If you don’t have a resume, now might be the time to create one.
When are job applications used by employers? For many part-time, entry-level, and blue collar jobs, employers use applications to screen potential employees; they use the information from the applications to determine who they are going to call for a job interview. For other types of jobs, applications are simply the paperwork the Human Resources department requires of all job applicants; employers often ask you to complete an application after they have invited you for an interview.
Why do employers use job applications? Many employers use applications as a way of standardizing the information they obtain from all job-seekers, including some things that you would not normally put on your resume. Your goal is to complete the application as completely and honestly as you can all the time remembering that the application is a key marketing tool for you in the job-hunting process. Remember that some employers will use your application as a basis for deciding whether to call you for an interview.
So, armed with this knowledge, here are the ins and outs of completing job applications.
Arrive prepared with the information you need. Be sure to bring your resume, social security card, driver’s license, etc. You probably will also need addresses and phone numbers of previous employers, as well as starting and ending salaries for each previous job. It’s always better if have too much information than not enough.
Read and follow instructions carefully. Always take a few minutes to review the entire application. Some applications ask for information differently and all have specific spaces in which you are expected to answer questions. Think of the application as your first test in following instructions.
Complete the application as neatly as possible. Remember how important handwriting was in school? Neatness and legibility count; the application is a reflection of you. Consider typing it if you have access to a typewriter. If completing it by hand, be sure to use only a blue or black pen and consider using an erasable pen or taking some “white-out” to fix minor mistakes. Don’t fold, bend, or otherwise mar the application.
Tailor your answers to the job you are seeking. Just as with your resume and cover letter, you want to focus your education and experience to the job at hand. Give details of skills and accomplishments, and avoid framing your experiences in terms of mere duties and responsibilities. Show why you are more qualified than other applicants for the position. Include experience from all sources, including previous jobs, school, clubs and organizations, and volunteer work.
Don’t leave any blanks. One of the reasons employers have you complete an application is because they want the same information from all job applicants. However, if there are questions that do not apply to you, simply respond with “not applicable,” or “n/a.” Do not write “see resume” when completing the application (but you can certainly attach your resume to the application).
Don’t provide any negative information. As with any job search correspondence, never offer negative information. Your goal with the application is to get an interview. Providing negative information (such as being fired from a job) just gives the employer a reason not to interview you.
Always answer questions truthfully. The fastest way for an application to hit the trash can is to have a lie on it, but that doesn’t mean you need to give complete answers either. For example, many applications ask your reason for leaving your last job. If you were fired or downsized, you should try to be as positive as possible and leave longer explanations for the interview; some experts recommend writing “job ended” as the reason you left your last job.
Do not put specific salary requirements. It is way too early in the job-seeking process to allow yourself to be identified by a specific salary request. You don’t want to give employers too much information too soon. In addition, employers often use this question as a screening device and you don’t want to be eliminated from consideration based on your answer. It’s best to say “open” or “negotiable.” You can find lots more information about all aspects of salary and benefits by going to our Salary Negotiation Tips.
Provide references. Employers want to see that there are people who will provide objective information about you to them. Pick your references carefully and make sure you ask if they are willing to be a reference for you before you list them. Where do you get references? From past employers, to teachers, to family friends. Most young job-seekers have a mix of professional and character references, while more experienced job-seekers focus on professional references who can speak of your skills and accomplishments.
Keep your application consistent with your resume. Make sure all dates, names, titles, etc., on your application coincide with the information on your resume. Don’t worry if the application is based on chronological employment while you have a functional resume. Don’t know the difference between the two types of resumes?
Proofread your application before submitting it. Once you’ve completed the application, sit back and take a moment to thoroughly proofread the document, checking for all errors especially typos and misspellings.
One final word. Be prepared for all kinds of job applications, from simple one-page applications to multi-page applications; and some will be clean and crisp copies while others will appear to be photocopied a few too many times. Regardless, take your time and do the best you can, always keeping in the back of your mind the goal of the application getting you an interview.
If you have not heard from the employer within a week of submitting your application, you should follow-up with the employer. There’s truth to the “squeaky wheel” cliché. Ask for an interview and ask to have your application kept on file.
For 20,000 computer tips n tricks. visit … http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com

Job-Hunting in Times of Uncertainty: Five Overlooked Strategies to Help Make Your Job Search More Productive and Successful

In times when the economy falters, when financial markets fall, and when companies of all sizes in many industries announce plans to reduce their workforce, job-seekers tend to get a bit concerned about the length and success of the job search they may face. It almost goes without saying that job-hunting in a boom economy is quite different (and much easier) than job-hunting in a slumping economy.
Different, yes. Harder and often more time-consuming, yes. Impossible, no. Job-hunting is an art that simply takes more time and work to perfect in uncertain times than in good times. You will have to work harder and smarter at finding new opportunities, but they are out there, and if you take advantage of these five strategies you will be much better positioned to land a new job.
Utilizing the Power of Networking
What’s the most important tool of job-hunting, especially in times of uncertainty? Not a resume nor interviewing skills…but networking. Why networking? Networking is the most effective tool of job-hunting because if you use your network properly, you will hear of multiple job opportunities, often before they are even listed (if they are ever listed).
Some job-seekers shy away from networking because they equate networking with taking advantage of people, but if done correctly, networking can be a rewarding experience for all parties involved. Networking is not asking everyone you know for a job. Networking means developing a broad list of contacts family, friends, and people you’ve met through various social and business functions and using them to your advantage when you look for a job. People in your network may be able to give you job leads, offer you advice and information about a particular company or industry, and introduce you to others so that you can expand your network.
Now is the time to broaden your network even if you are not currently looking for a new job. You never know when you’ll need your network, so make every effort to grow it.
Need more information about networking? We have lots of networking tips, names and contacts for numerous networking and professional organizations, networking do’s and don’ts, and much more in The Career Guide.
Finding Hidden Job Opportunities
In good times job openings are plentiful, but in uncertain times the job openings disappear. Job-seekers are left scrambling for the few “open” jobs. But there are always other job possibilities lurking in the background, and it is up to the persistent job-seeker to find those hidden job opportunities and/or to create new opportunities.
Finding hidden opportunities. Job-seekers must take full advantage of their network to uncover as many potential job openings as possible. Hunt down every lead. Consider using cold calling techniques to find other opportunities. Focus more of your time and energy here than trying to respond to every job posting at Monster.com or the other job boards.
Creating new opportunities. As companies downsize and consolidate job functions, many opportunities may arise for a job-seeker with the right skills. Determine your most marketable skills, examine the ongoing needs of the employers where you want to work (including your current employer), and develop a proposal showcasing how the employer would benefit from hiring you.
Sharpening the Focus of Your Resume
One of the most important tips you can take away from this article is this one: resumes are supposed to document your skills and accomplishments, not your duties and responsibilities. Make a list of the two or three accomplishments from each of your recent jobs and then use them on your resume. Try to quantify accomplishments as much as possible.
Decide whether a traditional chronological resume format is better for you or whether you need a functional resume format, or some type of hybrid format.
Consider developing a “qualifications summary” or “key accomplishments” section for your resume. Think of this section as the executive summary of your resume. If the employer reads only this one part of your resume, will it be enough to entice the employer to read the rest of your resume?
Develop multiple resumes, perhaps even customizing each resume you send to the specific job and employer. Also consider multiple resume formats, from the standard formatted paper resume to a scannable text resume and Web-based resume.
Finally, remember that a resume is a living document. You are never “done” with your resume. You should update and edit your resume(s) regularly, adding new accomplishments and skills, sharpening the focus, removing outdated material.
Developing a Dynamic Cover Letter
A cover letter is an integral tool of your job search. Perhaps in the past you have been able to get good jobs with a mediocre cover letter, but in uncertain times, your cover letter becomes the main tool that can determine whether your resume is read and whether you are even considered as a candidate for a position.
How can you improve your cover letter? Let’s review the two most important parts of the cover letter: the introductory paragraph and the ending paragraph.
The first paragraph of your cover letter must sell the employer on the benefits/skills/talent you will bring to the job – a mix that no other job-seeker has and one that has a clear benefit to the employer. Do not waste this critical opening paragraph.
Weak opening paragraph: I am writing today to apply for the account manager position you have posted on your company Website.
Better opening paragraph: I have increased the size and sales levels of my client base in every position I have held, which in turn has increased the revenues and profits of my employers. I want to bring this same success to the account position you have posted on your Website.
The final paragraph of your cover letter must be proactive. You must ask for the job interview (or a meeting) in this paragraph. You must express your confidence that you are a perfect fit for the job. You must also put the employer on notice that you plan to follow-up within a specified time.
Weak closing paragraph: I hope you will review my resume, and if you agree with what I have stated here, consider me for the position. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
Better closing paragraph: I am eager to help advance the success of your company, and I am convinced that we should arrange a time to meet. I will call your office in the next week to schedule an appointment.
Mastering the Art of Follow-Up
In good times, some job-seekers may be able to get away with being impolite in not sending thank you letters and being lazy by not following up all leads, but in a tight or uncertain job market, job-seekers must follow-up every job lead, every job application, and every job interview.
Some job-seekers may see follow-up as too aggressive, but the cliché about the squeaky wheel getting the grease applies to job-seeking. As long as you don’t contact the employer too often or act abusive, following up with emails or phone calls is a way to stay at the forefront of the minds of the employers, as well as a way for you to stay on top of the status of the search. Each time you follow-up, your strategy should be to reinforce the perception that you are the ideal candidate for the job; the job-seeker with the unique set of skills and experiences required for the job.
Follow-up each cover letter and resume you send with a phone call or email requesting an interview. Follow-up each interview you have with a thank you note or letter to each person who interviewed you. And follow-up your thank you note with a phone call or email to again express your interest and fit with the job and check on the status of the search.
Final Thoughts
Persistence and patience are the important traits to have when job-hunting in uncertain times. Persistence, because as mentioned in this article, the job-seeker that tracks down all leads and follows up with every person is the one who is going to have more opportunities. And patience because in uncertain times, employers will slow down (sometimes even stall) the job search process, so you need to be prepared for the job search to be long.
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm 
or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for 
Career Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more …. 

Job-Hunting in Times of Uncertainty: Five Overlooked Strategies to Help Make Your Job Search More Productive and Successful

In times when the economy falters, when financial markets fall, and when companies of all sizes in many industries announce plans to reduce their workforce, job-seekers tend to get a bit concerned about the length and success of the job search they may face. It almost goes without saying that job-hunting in a boom economy is quite different (and much easier) than job-hunting in a slumping economy.
Different, yes. Harder and often more time-consuming, yes. Impossible, no. Job-hunting is an art that simply takes more time and work to perfect in uncertain times than in good times. You will have to work harder and smarter at finding new opportunities, but they are out there, and if you take advantage of these five strategies you will be much better positioned to land a new job.
Utilizing the Power of Networking
What’s the most important tool of job-hunting, especially in times of uncertainty? Not a resume nor interviewing skills…but networking. Why networking? Networking is the most effective tool of job-hunting because if you use your network properly, you will hear of multiple job opportunities, often before they are even listed (if they are ever listed).
Some job-seekers shy away from networking because they equate networking with taking advantage of people, but if done correctly, networking can be a rewarding experience for all parties involved. Networking is not asking everyone you know for a job. Networking means developing a broad list of contacts family, friends, and people you’ve met through various social and business functions and using them to your advantage when you look for a job. People in your network may be able to give you job leads, offer you advice and information about a particular company or industry, and introduce you to others so that you can expand your network.
Now is the time to broaden your network even if you are not currently looking for a new job. You never know when you’ll need your network, so make every effort to grow it.
Need more information about networking? We have lots of networking tips, names and contacts for numerous networking and professional organizations, networking do’s and don’ts, and much more in The Career Guide.
Finding Hidden Job Opportunities
In good times job openings are plentiful, but in uncertain times the job openings disappear. Job-seekers are left scrambling for the few “open” jobs. But there are always other job possibilities lurking in the background, and it is up to the persistent job-seeker to find those hidden job opportunities and/or to create new opportunities.
Finding hidden opportunities. Job-seekers must take full advantage of their network to uncover as many potential job openings as possible. Hunt down every lead. Consider using cold calling techniques to find other opportunities. Focus more of your time and energy here than trying to respond to every job posting at Monster.com or the other job boards.
Creating new opportunities. As companies downsize and consolidate job functions, many opportunities may arise for a job-seeker with the right skills. Determine your most marketable skills, examine the ongoing needs of the employers where you want to work (including your current employer), and develop a proposal showcasing how the employer would benefit from hiring you.
Sharpening the Focus of Your Resume
One of the most important tips you can take away from this article is this one: resumes are supposed to document your skills and accomplishments, not your duties and responsibilities. Make a list of the two or three accomplishments from each of your recent jobs and then use them on your resume. Try to quantify accomplishments as much as possible.
Decide whether a traditional chronological resume format is better for you or whether you need a functional resume format, or some type of hybrid format.
Consider developing a “qualifications summary” or “key accomplishments” section for your resume. Think of this section as the executive summary of your resume. If the employer reads only this one part of your resume, will it be enough to entice the employer to read the rest of your resume?
Develop multiple resumes, perhaps even customizing each resume you send to the specific job and employer. Also consider multiple resume formats, from the standard formatted paper resume to a scannable text resume and Web-based resume.
Finally, remember that a resume is a living document. You are never “done” with your resume. You should update and edit your resume(s) regularly, adding new accomplishments and skills, sharpening the focus, removing outdated material.
Developing a Dynamic Cover Letter
A cover letter is an integral tool of your job search. Perhaps in the past you have been able to get good jobs with a mediocre cover letter, but in uncertain times, your cover letter becomes the main tool that can determine whether your resume is read and whether you are even considered as a candidate for a position.
How can you improve your cover letter? Let’s review the two most important parts of the cover letter: the introductory paragraph and the ending paragraph.
The first paragraph of your cover letter must sell the employer on the benefits/skills/talent you will bring to the job – a mix that no other job-seeker has and one that has a clear benefit to the employer. Do not waste this critical opening paragraph.
Weak opening paragraph: I am writing today to apply for the account manager position you have posted on your company Website.
Better opening paragraph: I have increased the size and sales levels of my client base in every position I have held, which in turn has increased the revenues and profits of my employers. I want to bring this same success to the account position you have posted on your Website.
The final paragraph of your cover letter must be proactive. You must ask for the job interview (or a meeting) in this paragraph. You must express your confidence that you are a perfect fit for the job. You must also put the employer on notice that you plan to follow-up within a specified time.
Weak closing paragraph: I hope you will review my resume, and if you agree with what I have stated here, consider me for the position. I look forward to hearing from you soon.
Better closing paragraph: I am eager to help advance the success of your company, and I am convinced that we should arrange a time to meet. I will call your office in the next week to schedule an appointment.
Mastering the Art of Follow-Up
In good times, some job-seekers may be able to get away with being impolite in not sending thank you letters and being lazy by not following up all leads, but in a tight or uncertain job market, job-seekers must follow-up every job lead, every job application, and every job interview.
Some job-seekers may see follow-up as too aggressi
ve, but the cliché about the squeaky wheel getting the grease applies to job-seeking. As long as you don’t contact the employer too often or act abusive, following up with emails or phone calls is a way to stay at the forefront of the minds of the employers, as well as a way for you to stay on top of the status of the search. Each time you follow-up, your strategy should be to reinforce the perception that you are the ideal candidate for the job; the job-seeker with the unique set of skills and experiences required for the job.
Follow-up each cover letter and resume you send with a phone call or email requesting an interview. Follow-up each interview you have with a thank you note or letter to each person who interviewed you. And follow-up your thank you note with a phone call or email to again express your interest and fit with the job and check on the status of the search.
Final Thoughts
Persistence and patience are the important traits to have when job-hunting in uncertain times. Persistence, because as mentioned in this article, the job-seeker that tracks down all leads and follows up with every person is the one who is going to have more opportunities. And patience because in uncertain times, employers will slow down (sometimes even stall) the job search process, so you need to be prepared for the job search to be long.
visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm 
or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/> for 
Career Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields and 
Exams/Certifications & a lot more …. 

Just Do It! Six Reasons to Ride a Bike or Walk to Work

As an avid walker and bike-rider, I have to admit that I am biased in my views about biking or walking to work but I am also an excellent case-study of someone who has become much healthier since taking up biking and walking several years ago. I also spent the last year biking to and from my job at a local university.
So… why should you buy those new walking shoes or invest in a good bike? Here are my six reasons for riding a bike or walking to work:
1. It’s efficient. Biking or walking to work allows you to accomplish two things with the same activity. First, choosing to bike or walk solves the issue of how to get to work. Second, by biking or walking you improve your health, fitness, and mental outlook. In fact, biking or walking to work is both efficient and effective.
2. It’s healthful. There’s no question that walking or biking to work at a decent pace (no need to set records here) provides excellent cardiovascular exercise, offering many health benefits, including weight loss, muscle tone development, as well as lowering your blood pressure and stress levels while also reducing your risk of heart attack, hypertension, osteoporosis, and type II diabetes.
3. It’s cheap. Consider the gas, tolls, parking, and upkeep on a car or the monthly bus or train pass you are currently paying versus the cost of walking or biking to work. You may need to invest in a new pair of walking shoes or a better bike, but once you’ve made that purchase, you have minimal additional costs. And if you’re really lucky and work for an organization that has a workplace wellness program, you may even be able to get the shoes or bike at a reduced price — or even free.
4. It’s rewarding. Besides the psychological benefits of feeling better about yourself, walking or biking to work also offers very clear mental benefits — from adrenaline and endorphins — that boost your mood and provide you with a sense of well-being. Because it’s often a solitary experience, walking or biking also provides opportunities for deep thoughts that tap into your creative side, leading to new ideas and ways to solve problems.
5. It’s green. You don’t have to be a diehard environmentalist to appreciate that by walking or biking to work you are doing something to personally reduce the negative impact of other forms of transportation. One expert states that for every four miles ridden on a bicycle (or walked presumably), you are keeping 15 pounds of pollutants out of the atmosphere. No fossil fuels, no ozone depletion, no deadly pollutants.
6. It’s fun. Driving to or from work is often stressful (or at best boring), while biking or walking is always an adventure. It’s relaxing, especially on the way home, to know you have had another good day at work and are now helping yourself live a longer and healthier life by biking or walking. And no matter where you live, you’re bound to encounter people or things in nature that make you appreciate life.
 

visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm 

or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/

for Career Building in all type of Tech. & I.T. Fields 

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