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Archive for May, 2010

Converting Your Seasonal Job to a Permanent Position: Tips for Success

Benefits to working seasonal and holiday jobs include the extra income and store discounts you may receive. Even more beneficial is that if you have an interest, you can also set yourself up as a prime candidate for converting that part-time job into a full-time position.

Seasonal and holiday work is a lot like temp work in that it’s a great opportunity for job-seekers to get a foot in the door. Yes, most holiday workers are hired with the promise of working only for a certain amount of time. By making a name for yourself during those short months you are on the job, you may be able to turn that holiday position into something permanent.

What are some tips for making a name for yourself?

  1. Be dependable. Know your schedule and always show up on time. Tell your supervisor that you are available in a pinch if there’s a need. Retail managers are constantly struggling to find reliable workers, so as long as you are dependable, this tip should be an easy one to master.
  2. Do the work. Show that you are not just working the job to make some holiday cash, but instead there to help the company. Workers who are just putting in their “time,” are easy to spot and managers know who those folks are. Instead, show your value by always trying to go above and beyond what is asked of you.
  3. Network within the company. Get to know all the managers — and make sure they know your strengths. The more managers who know who you are and what you’re capable of will give you multiple opportunities to shine and land one or more permanent openings.
  4. Look the part. Companies like Abercrombie even admit to hiring people who look like their customers (like they belong at the store). Even if you wear a vest or coat, or some other type of uniform, if you are dealing with customers, you should always try to look and dress your best. Good grooming and hygiene are essential.
  5. Be the problem-solver. Whenever there is a problem that needs to be resolved, volunteer to help solve the problem. Managers love workers who are not only self-sufficient, but who think proactively, taking care of little problems before they become major catastrophes.
  6. Avoid the grapevine. Spending too much time gossiping about fellow co-workers is one of the sure ways to make a name for yourself in the totally WRONG way. Now, this tip doesn’t mean you should not be friendly; quite the opposite. You should be friendly with all co-workers (as well as customers) just stay away from talking about other people.
  7. Don’t overdo the employee discount. Sure, the discount is there for you to use and it’s a great win-win to have the extra income AND get a discount, just don’t go crazy with it. Share the discount with your family members, but don’t have the whole neighborhood coming to the store to get your discount.
  8. Express your interest. There is certainly no harm to talking with all the managers once you’ve established some rapport with them that you are interested in a full-time position should one become available.

Final Thoughts
If a career in retail is something that interests you, a great way to get a foot in the door is through seasonal employment. If you avoid the pitfalls and focus on showcasing your enthusiasm, accomplishing as much as you can while on the seasonal payroll, you can slowly position yourself for a permanent slot with the company.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

——————————————————————-

You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Converting Your Seasonal Job to a Permanent Position: Tips for Success

Benefits to working seasonal and holiday jobs include the extra income and store discounts you may receive. Even more beneficial is that if you have an interest, you can also set yourself up as a prime candidate for converting that part-time job into a full-time position.

Seasonal and holiday work is a lot like temp work in that it’s a great opportunity for job-seekers to get a foot in the door. Yes, most holiday workers are hired with the promise of working only for a certain amount of time. By making a name for yourself during those short months you are on the job, you may be able to turn that holiday position into something permanent.

What are some tips for making a name for yourself?

  1. Be dependable. Know your schedule and always show up on time. Tell your supervisor that you are available in a pinch if there’s a need. Retail managers are constantly struggling to find reliable workers, so as long as you are dependable, this tip should be an easy one to master.
  2. Do the work. Show that you are not just working the job to make some holiday cash, but instead there to help the company. Workers who are just putting in their “time,” are easy to spot and managers know who those folks are. Instead, show your value by always trying to go above and beyond what is asked of you.
  3. Network within the company. Get to know all the managers — and make sure they know your strengths. The more managers who know who you are and what you’re capable of will give you multiple opportunities to shine and land one or more permanent openings.
  4. Look the part. Companies like Abercrombie even admit to hiring people who look like their customers (like they belong at the store). Even if you wear a vest or coat, or some other type of uniform, if you are dealing with customers, you should always try to look and dress your best. Good grooming and hygiene are essential.
  5. Be the problem-solver. Whenever there is a problem that needs to be resolved, volunteer to help solve the problem. Managers love workers who are not only self-sufficient, but who think proactively, taking care of little problems before they become major catastrophes.
  6. Avoid the grapevine. Spending too much time gossiping about fellow co-workers is one of the sure ways to make a name for yourself in the totally WRONG way. Now, this tip doesn’t mean you should not be friendly; quite the opposite. You should be friendly with all co-workers (as well as customers) just stay away from talking about other people.
  7. Don’t overdo the employee discount. Sure, the discount is there for you to use and it’s a great win-win to have the extra income AND get a discount, just don’t go crazy with it. Share the discount with your family members, but don’t have the whole neighborhood coming to the store to get your discount.
  8. Express your interest. There is certainly no harm to talking with all the managers once you’ve established some rapport with them that you are interested in a full-time position should one become available.

Final Thoughts
If a career in retail is something that interests you, a great way to get a foot in the door is through seasonal employment. If you avoid the pitfalls and focus on showcasing your enthusiasm, accomplishing as much as you can while on the seasonal payroll, you can slowly position yourself for a permanent slot with the company.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

——————————————————————-

You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Build a More Meaningful Career

11,000 days. That’s the number of days you’ll probably work over your lifetime. You’ll likely have six or seven career changes and 11 or 12 jobs in total. You may be wondering if you need a change now.

30 million people go to work each day to a job they hate. The harmful feelings permeate their entire life, putting a negative cloud over the home, their friends and many of their other activities. They may lack the know-how to change, may be afraid of leaving the security of a paycheck, or have a hundred excuses for why it’s okay to be so dissatisfied and stay at their job.

There is a better way to live your life. Meaningful purpose is a driving force that adds enthusiasm to your days. Taking a passion and making it your career, living a dream can be not just a wish, but a true and certain reality. Here are a few steps to get the new career rolling:

Do some self-analysis. Ask yourself What really matters to me? What problem or wrong would I like to fix? What do I enjoy? Where are my interests and hobbies? What are my priorities? What is my secret passion? What do I want to do with the rest of my life? Reviewing these questions can give you new insight to where you want to go.

Use your unique genius and talents. Every person is born with a unique set of natural abilities. Talents, such as managing, creating, researching, training others, drawing, can all seem like easy work because you have a natural flair for them. True happiness comes from combining your natural talents, developing and excelling in them, and working in a field, job, industry that you have a passionate interest in.

Others have done it and so can you. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that we can change if we really want to. Although she was a prominent lawyer, my client Sarah was dissatisfied in her work, and glad to take a few years off to have two children. She told me she hated “practicing law.” She found it boring, yet she felt enormous guilt at abandoning a career she spent years training for and made great money in. We worked together, focusing on her real interests and natural talents. Sarah landed a terrific new job as an executive director for a nonprofit organization. She leads others, influences policies, develops programs, and is a very happy person. “I even make a great salary, but I love my job so much, I’d do this for free,” she said.

Make a decision. Many people flounder for years and never turn their dreams into reality. They let themselves remain in a negative or stuck place. Only action can change your life. Read a book. Take vocational tests. Use a good career-management professional. Do some career exploration and gather all the information you need. Then make a decision and go forward. Outline the action steps to reach your career goal. The only thing at stake is your happiness. Finding meaning, passion and purpose every day you go to work is the wonderful reward, so don’t wait any longer. Begin right now and set in motion your own plan to live a happier, more satisfying life.

by Robin Ryan
——————————————————————-
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Build a More Meaningful Career

11,000 days. That’s the number of days you’ll probably work over your lifetime. You’ll likely have six or seven career changes and 11 or 12 jobs in total. You may be wondering if you need a change now.

30 million people go to work each day to a job they hate. The harmful feelings permeate their entire life, putting a negative cloud over the home, their friends and many of their other activities. They may lack the know-how to change, may be afraid of leaving the security of a paycheck, or have a hundred excuses for why it’s okay to be so dissatisfied and stay at their job.

There is a better way to live your life. Meaningful purpose is a driving force that adds enthusiasm to your days. Taking a passion and making it your career, living a dream can be not just a wish, but a true and certain reality. Here are a few steps to get the new career rolling:

Do some self-analysis. Ask yourself What really matters to me? What problem or wrong would I like to fix? What do I enjoy? Where are my interests and hobbies? What are my priorities? What is my secret passion? What do I want to do with the rest of my life? Reviewing these questions can give you new insight to where you want to go.

Use your unique genius and talents. Every person is born with a unique set of natural abilities. Talents, such as managing, creating, researching, training others, drawing, can all seem like easy work because you have a natural flair for them. True happiness comes from combining your natural talents, developing and excelling in them, and working in a field, job, industry that you have a passionate interest in.

Others have done it and so can you. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that we can change if we really want to. Although she was a prominent lawyer, my client Sarah was dissatisfied in her work, and glad to take a few years off to have two children. She told me she hated “practicing law.” She found it boring, yet she felt enormous guilt at abandoning a career she spent years training for and made great money in. We worked together, focusing on her real interests and natural talents. Sarah landed a terrific new job as an executive director for a nonprofit organization. She leads others, influences policies, develops programs, and is a very happy person. “I even make a great salary, but I love my job so much, I’d do this for free,” she said.

Make a decision. Many people flounder for years and never turn their dreams into reality. They let themselves remain in a negative or stuck place. Only action can change your life. Read a book. Take vocational tests. Use a good career-management professional. Do some career exploration and gather all the information you need. Then make a decision and go forward. Outline the action steps to reach your career goal. The only thing at stake is your happiness. Finding meaning, passion and purpose every day you go to work is the wonderful reward, so don’t wait any longer. Begin right now and set in motion your own plan to live a happier, more satisfying life.

by Robin Ryan
——————————————————————-
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

The New Era of Job-Hunting: Strategies for Finding Employment on the Internet

Looking for a job may never be the same. With the huge growth of employment-related Web sites on the Internet, a job-seeker cannot afford to overlook searching for a job electronically. Successfully navigating this frontier, however, requires new skills and strategies. The focus of this article is to provide you with a roadmap that will guide you through the maze of Web sites related to career development and job-hunting and give you directions to the best resources currently available to job-seekers.

Before we begin this journey, one caveat: Job-hunting on the Internet should, in no way, be your sole means of looking for a new job. The traditional methods of networking, job boards, classified ads, and targeted job searches should still be part of your overall job-hunting plan. The Internet simply expands the job-hunting resources that are available to you.

For those unsure of their career direction, the first step might be to one of several Web sites that offer Career Assessment Tools, such as the Ansir Self-Perception Test or the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, which score results from online questionnaires and provide suggestions of appropriate careers for your type.

Most others will start the journey by going to one of several career development Web sites, such as Quintessential Careers or The Riley Guide, which can provide assistance with developing or honing your resume and cover letter writing, finding the best sources for researching companies, strengthening your interviewing skills, learning how to network, mastering salary negotiation, as well as perfecting other key career and job-hunting skills. If you only have one type of resume, then you should definitely start here. Most job-hunting experts now talk about three kinds of resumes:

  • The traditional resume: this version has all the bells and whistles, including nice formatting. The focus is on action verbs and accomplishments.
  • The scannable resume: this version is a stripped down version of your traditional resume, in plain text for easy scanning into computer databases. The focus is on nouns and phrases, as well as key accomplishments.
  • The Web-based resume: this version is similar to your traditional resume, but published on your personal Web site so that is always available to potential employers.

Once you’ve honed your skills in these areas, the next step is to develop a strategy for job-hunting on the Internet. If you’re a college student or recent college graduate, your approach will be much broader than if you are a seasoned veteran, partly because of the need for confidentiality of people currently in the workplace, partly because of the availability of Web sites at different career levels, and partly because a less developed network. Keeping these issues in mind, there are four different types of Web resources for job-seekers:

  1. Job networking Web sites and discussion lists. There are thousands of Internet-based discussion lists on almost every subject and profession imaginable. Join one or more of these lists and network with people in your field; employers sometimes subscribe to these lists to screen potential candidates. Finally, many professional organizations have Web sites that have forums to facilitate networking.
  2. General job databank and resume sites. Web sites such as the Yahoo! HotJobs and Monster.com have large databases of job openings where you can search by profession or keywords. College students should visit College Recruiter Employment Site or TrueCareers. Many of these sites allow you to post your resume for free, and some even offer job and applicant matching services. Some of these sites allow you to post your resume without revealing your name for the sake of confidentiality.
  3. Specialized job sites. There are also hundreds of specialized job Web sites, from employment recruiters of all types to specialized job databank sites that focus on a specific industry. If you’re an executive, you might want to go to FutureStep. If you’re an accountant, you might want to go to JobsinThe Money. And if you’re a marketer, you might want to go to Marketing Jobs.
  4. Company sites. If you have a specific set of companies you would most like to work for, the best solution might simply be to go the each company’s Web site and review job postings. Many of these companies allow you to apply online, and they often list the contact person so you should be able to easily follow-up, as you would if you sent a cover letter and resume to an employer. The link directly to the career centers of hundreds of firms in Quintessential Directory of Company Career Centers.

Will these steps guarantee you success in finding a new job or career? No. No method is guaranteed to work, but as more and more companies go to the Internet for faster and more efficient job searches, it does not make sense to ignore this new avenue of networking and job-hunting.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

——————————————————————————-
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc. ………

The New Era of Job-Hunting: Strategies for Finding Employment on the Internet

Looking for a job may never be the same. With the huge growth of employment-related Web sites on the Internet, a job-seeker cannot afford to overlook searching for a job electronically. Successfully navigating this frontier, however, requires new skills and strategies. The focus of this article is to provide you with a roadmap that will guide you through the maze of Web sites related to career development and job-hunting and give you directions to the best resources currently available to job-seekers.

Before we begin this journey, one caveat: Job-hunting on the Internet should, in no way, be your sole means of looking for a new job. The traditional methods of networking, job boards, classified ads, and targeted job searches should still be part of your overall job-hunting plan. The Internet simply expands the job-hunting resources that are available to you.

For those unsure of their career direction, the first step might be to one of several Web sites that offer Career Assessment Tools, such as the Ansir Self-Perception Test or the Keirsey Temperament Sorter, which score results from online questionnaires and provide suggestions of appropriate careers for your type.

Most others will start the journey by going to one of several career development Web sites, such as Quintessential Careers or The Riley Guide, which can provide assistance with developing or honing your resume and cover letter writing, finding the best sources for researching companies, strengthening your interviewing skills, learning how to network, mastering salary negotiation, as well as perfecting other key career and job-hunting skills. If you only have one type of resume, then you should definitely start here. Most job-hunting experts now talk about three kinds of resumes:

  • The traditional resume: this version has all the bells and whistles, including nice formatting. The focus is on action verbs and accomplishments.
  • The scannable resume: this version is a stripped down version of your traditional resume, in plain text for easy scanning into computer databases. The focus is on nouns and phrases, as well as key accomplishments.
  • The Web-based resume: this version is similar to your traditional resume, but published on your personal Web site so that is always available to potential employers.

Once you’ve honed your skills in these areas, the next step is to develop a strategy for job-hunting on the Internet. If you’re a college student or recent college graduate, your approach will be much broader than if you are a seasoned veteran, partly because of the need for confidentiality of people currently in the workplace, partly because of the availability of Web sites at different career levels, and partly because a less developed network. Keeping these issues in mind, there are four different types of Web resources for job-seekers:

  1. Job networking Web sites and discussion lists. There are thousands of Internet-based discussion lists on almost every subject and profession imaginable. Join one or more of these lists and network with people in your field; employers sometimes subscribe to these lists to screen potential candidates. Finally, many professional organizations have Web sites that have forums to facilitate networking.
  2. General job databank and resume sites. Web sites such as the Yahoo! HotJobs and Monster.com have large databases of job openings where you can search by profession or keywords. College students should visit College Recruiter Employment Site or TrueCareers. Many of these sites allow you to post your resume for free, and some even offer job and applicant matching services. Some of these sites allow you to post your resume without revealing your name for the sake of confidentiality.
  3. Specialized job sites. There are also hundreds of specialized job Web sites, from employment recruiters of all types to specialized job databank sites that focus on a specific industry. If you’re an executive, you might want to go to FutureStep. If you’re an accountant, you might want to go to JobsinThe Money. And if you’re a marketer, you might want to go to Marketing Jobs.
  4. Company sites. If you have a specific set of companies you would most like to work for, the best solution might simply be to go the each company’s Web site and review job postings. Many of these companies allow you to apply online, and they often list the contact person so you should be able to easily follow-up, as you would if you sent a cover letter and resume to an employer. The link directly to the career centers of hundreds of firms in Quintessential Directory of Company Career Centers.

Will these steps guarantee you success in finding a new job or career? No. No method is guaranteed to work, but as more and more companies go to the Internet for faster and more efficient job searches, it does not make sense to ignore this new avenue of networking and job-hunting.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

——————————————————————————-
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc. ………

Job-Hunting in a Weak Job Market: 5 Strategies for Staying Upbeat (and Improving Your Chances of Success)

Job Market Blues: A malady affecting millions of Americans during a weak job market caused by a struggling economy. Symptoms include high levels of anxiety, fear, and depression related to keeping one’s current job or finding a new job, tied to the ability to pay one’s bills and maintain a place to live and food to eat.

For many job-seekers, searching for a new job is a stressful experience. The end result, though, is usually a positive one in which the job-seeker is rewarded for his or her past accomplishments with a better job, a job that has more prestige, higher pay, and perhaps with a better organization.

But when you have to conduct a job-search in a weak job market, the stress level increases dramatically especially if you are currently unemployed, expect to be let go from your current employer, or work in an industry or profession that has seen widespread job cuts.

To make matters worse, it’s hard not to get anxious and depressed from the daily economic and job news we receive. Just about every day we hear about another company announcing layoffs or some economist predicting more months of job losses and a sharp increase in the unemployment rate… leading many into the Job Market Blues.

Let’s face it if very few politicians will. The U.S. economy is in a recession. While other economic data may not yet confirm what many of us have known for months, history shows that anytime in the last century when the economy has had at least six consecutive months of job losses, the economy has ultimately been declared in recession.

So, when all this bad news abounds and adds to the stress you already feel in trying to find a new job, how do you keep your focus and stay upbeat? What’s the remedy? Granted, it can be difficult, but if you follow the five strategies in this article, you should be well on your way to overcoming the stress and anxiety and landing that next great job or at least a job that will help you pay your bills.

1. Keep a positive focus. In a weak job market, employers that are actually hiring workers have a much greater selection of prospective candidates and will quickly eliminate any job-seekers who appear desperate or too negative.

Your goal, even if you are scrambling to pay your mortgage and put food on the table, is to appear outwardly positive. Employers seek job candidates who are confident and specific about the jobs they seek and the impact they can make in those positions.

You may need to consider temping or a survival job if you are currently unemployed while you seek a new job in your profession, and while that is not the ideal scenario, doing so will allow you to pay your bills, gain some renewed confidence, and give you an emotional boost that will help in your job interviews.

If you were downsized or fired, you face some additional challenges of convincing yourself that you are still a good job prospect.

One final tip. When the bad news is overwhelming or you are feeling angry and frustrated, try and find a way to step outside the bubble. Take a few hours to get away from all the bad news do something enjoyable like going to the park or beach or down to the river to fish. Doing so will not make all the bad news disappear but will give you a mental break you need to face the next challenges.

2. Surround yourself with support. Do not suffer through a bad time alone. Seek out the emotional support of family and friends. Sometimes just talking out about our fears and the stress we are experiencing makes us feel better.

Whatever you do, don’t hide your problems from the people closest to you. There is no shame in being downsized or in struggling to find new employment. The comfort you can receive from a spouse, significant other, parent, or friend can be enough to give you the emotional boost you need to reinvigorate your job-search.

The other benefit from seeking the support of others is that the more people in your network of contacts that know you are seeking a job, the more likely you will uncover more job leads that you may never have found if people around you did not know you were seeking a new position.

One final tip. While using your existing network for support is a good start, consider taking additional steps to expanding your network. Join one or more community or professional organizations. An even better idea? Join together with other job-seekers in forming a job club, which has then dual benefits of offering support and potential job leads.

3. Don’t believe everything you hear or read. While much of the current employment news is certainly awful and we sometimes feel badly reporting that news in the Quintessential Careers Blog the reality is that there are many companies hiring new employees every day.

Of course, it’s not just employment news that turns our stomachs, but all the other economic bad news such as faltering banks, the weak dollar, rising inflation, and a president who wishes he had a magic wand to fix all the problems.

But there are also programs and professionals that can assist you in improving your job-hunting techniques or offering retraining opportunities. And the Congress is working on extending unemployment benefits and other economic packages to assist people struggling with bad mortgages.

One final tip. If you watch your local television news, turn it off at least until you have a new job. Several organizations have proven that most local news programs sensationalize bad news for ratings, and the more you watch these programs, the more you feel that the world is collapsing around you and you simply do not need that kind of atmosphere when you are struggling to keep your confidence.

4. Have long-term focus, but short-term goals. The most successful job-seekers have a long-term career strategy developed with smaller short-term goals to assist them in achieving that long-term goal.

Your most basic goal may be to simply find a new job in your field, but even in this job market, that could be more long-term. Instead of dwelling too much on getting the job, put more emphasis on the process of finding the job.

In other words, create daily job-hunting goals for yourself. Make it a goal to accomplish several things each day, such as tracking down job leads, applying for jobs, making new network contacts, following up job leads, going on job interviews.

One final tip. It’s a bit of a cliche, but the best way to really focus on finding a new job is to treat the job-search like a job in itself. Invest as much time, energy, and commitment to finding a new job as you do at your job. The more things you can do today to find a new job will result in more job opportunities maybe not tomorrow or even next month, but the rewards will come to you.

5. Remember that everything counts. Of course, everything counts — but let’s use a marketing example to demonstrate that when you are seeking a new job you are basically marketing yourself to prospective employers.

Marketing is not just about having a great product, but also having the right packaging, distribution, price, and promotion to attract consumers. There are many stories of great products that have failed miserably because of some flaw in the other elements of marketing.

If you are struggling with your job-search, review your entire marketing package:

Your product. All products need some freshening at times, but they also need to have obvious features that are in demand. Review your accomplishments, education and training, and other elements that make you or can make you a strong candidate. Just as consumers love new and shiny products, so too do employers seek job candidates who have the best mix of education, training, and accomplishments all packaged in a friendly, positive, and professional style.

Your promotion. The three most important elements in promoting yourself to employers are cover letters, resumes, and interviewing technique. If you are not getting any interviews, the problem could very well be with your resume or cover letter; seek advice from experts about the quality of your resume and cover letters (from local career one-stop centers, former bosses, your college career center, or a resume service). If you are going on interviews but not obtaining any offers, the problem may be with your interviewing style; consider asking a hiring manager who did not hire you to critique your interviewing style, or consider conducting a mock interview with someone in your network or a local career professional.

Your distribution channels. The vast majority of job-seekers who struggle in any economy to find a job typically are only utilizing a small part of their job-search distribution channels. When job-hunting, your most important channel for uncovering job lead is your network of contacts, the vast majority of new hires result from a personal recommendation of a network contact. And with the expansion of Web 2.0 tools, networking has exploded online. Besides networking, other channels for uncovering job leads includes: Web job boards (national, local, and industry/profession), company job postings, trade publications, local newspapers, cold calling, recruiters, career fairs, and career centers (local, university).

Your pricing. In any job market, it’s important to have a realistic idea of your value to prospective employers, but it is even more important in a weak market to not price yourself out of the chance to obtain the interview or receive the job offer. Use industry salary information as well as salary Website information to determine the salary you seek especially if employers ask for that information from the beginning with a salary request. You should also have a strong understanding of the salary negotiation process so you’re ready when the time arises. Finally, you typically should not undervalue yourself when job-hunting, but in bad times, you may be forced to take a big cut in salary just to pay the bills; if so, stay determined that it is just a temporary setback until the market gets better or until you can find a better job.

One final tip. Whether you believe the power that marketing has in job-hunting, the most important thing to remember is that you should always put your best foot forward in all aspects of job-hunting. You cannot be defeatist. You cannot appear demanding. You cannot appear or act overqualified. If you are not getting any interviews or if you are obtaining interviews only to be told you are underqualified or overqualified, the problem is indeed in the marketing of yourself and you’ll need to fix it before you’ll be successful.

Final Thoughts
In a struggling economy, the Job Market Blues affect us all. Staying upbeat in these weak economic times is tough even when you are happily employed and not seeking new employment. Job-hunting in such a job market can place a great strain on your self-confidence and outlook for the future. By following the advice in this article, you’ll not only regain some of your confidence but ideally uncover ways you can enhance and improve your job-search, leading to both short-term and long-term job goal successes and beating the blues.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

——————————————————————-
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

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