Just another WordPress.com site

Archive for June, 2010

Top 10 Companies Hiring Now – Hurry up

We know that searching for a job these days can be quite frustrating.

To help you get started, we’ve tracked down 10 top companies that posted the most new jobs this week.

Happy hunting!

1. Walmart
Working for Walmart is more than a job; it’s a place to develop your skills and build a career with competitive pay and health benefits for you and your family.

Top Job Categories:

2. Home Depot
Home Depot provides in home sales and service to The Home Depot’s growing base of “do it for me” customers.

Top Job Categories:

3. UPS
UPS is the world’s largest package delivery company and a leading global provider of specialized transportation and logistics services.

Top Job Categories:

4. Starbucks
Starbucks has become synonymous with the highest quality coffee, a welcoming environment, personalized service and a passion for innovation.

Top Job Categories:

5. Lockheed Martin Corporation
Lockheed Martin Corporation traces its roots back to the early days of flight. In 1909 aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin organized a company around a modest airplane construction business and built it into a major airframe supplier to U.S. military and commercial customers.

Top Job Categories:

6. McDonalds
McDonalds is one of the leading global foodservice retailers with more than 30,000 local restaurants serving 52 million people in more than 100 countries each day.

Top Job Categories:

7. Coca-Cola Enterprises
Coca Cola is a leader in manufacturing, selling, and distributing soft drinks.

Top Job Categories:

8. Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Sears is a leading full-line retailer providing merchandise, related services and quality brands such as Kenmore, Craftsman, Diehard and Lands’ End.

Top Job Categories:

9. AT&T
AT&T is the largest communications company in the United States. And the world. They are the industry leaders in providing wireless service, high speed internet access, local and long distance voice, and directory publishing and advertising services across the US.

Top Job Categories:

10. Boeing
Boeing is the world’s leading aerospace company and the largest manufacturer of commercial jetliners and military aircraft combined.

Top Job Categories:

By AOL.com

—————————————————————————
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Top 10 Companies Hiring Now – Hurry up

We know that searching for a job these days can be quite frustrating.

To help you get started, we’ve tracked down 10 top companies that posted the most new jobs this week.

Happy hunting!

1. Walmart
Working for Walmart is more than a job; it’s a place to develop your skills and build a career with competitive pay and health benefits for you and your family.

Top Job Categories:

2. Home Depot
Home Depot provides in home sales and service to The Home Depot’s growing base of “do it for me” customers.

Top Job Categories:

3. UPS
UPS is the world’s largest package delivery company and a leading global provider of specialized transportation and logistics services.

Top Job Categories:

4. Starbucks
Starbucks has become synonymous with the highest quality coffee, a welcoming environment, personalized service and a passion for innovation.

Top Job Categories:

5. Lockheed Martin Corporation
Lockheed Martin Corporation traces its roots back to the early days of flight. In 1909 aviation pioneer Glenn L. Martin organized a company around a modest airplane construction business and built it into a major airframe supplier to U.S. military and commercial customers.

Top Job Categories:

6. McDonalds
McDonalds is one of the leading global foodservice retailers with more than 30,000 local restaurants serving 52 million people in more than 100 countries each day.

Top Job Categories:

7. Coca-Cola Enterprises
Coca Cola is a leader in manufacturing, selling, and distributing soft drinks.

Top Job Categories:

8. Sears, Roebuck and Co.
Sears is a leading full-line retailer providing merchandise, related services and quality brands such as Kenmore, Craftsman, Diehard and Lands’ End.

Top Job Categories:

9. AT&T;
AT&T; is the largest communications company in the United States. And the world. They are the industry leaders in providing wireless service, high speed internet access, local and long distance voice, and directory publishing and advertising services across the US.

Top Job Categories:

10. Boeing
Boeing is the world’s leading aerospace company and the largest manufacturer of commercial jetliners and military aircraft combined.

Top Job Categories:

By AOL.com

—————————————————————————
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Taking Networking to the Next Level: Getting Your Name Out There – Have you ever Googled yourself?

You know… have you entered your name into the well-known Internet Google search engine to see how many times your name appears on the Web. To get a fairly accurate reading of how often your name appears, place it in quotation marks in Google, e.g., “Katharine Hansen.” If you have a very common name, add some other identifying information, such as the town you live in or your employer, e.g., “Katharine Hansen” “DeLand, FL” “The Career Guide.”

What does this little exercise have to do with networking? Even if you’ve never Googled yourself, it’s possible that an employer or recruiter has. It’s part of an emerging practice especially at senior and executive levels to find out how visible a prospective employee is. The number of citations or “hits” on Google is considered a reasonable gauge of a candidate’s visibility.

Networking has long been considered one of the most effective ways to job-hunt, in part because of the old adage that it’s not what you know but who you know. But increasingly, in the Information Age, success can spring not just from who you know but from who knows you.

This article explores a new type of passive networking with some very active elements. While some may consider getting your name out there to be a form of personal branding or horn-tooting, networking can provide avenues for raising your visibility and building your aura as an attractive candidate for hire. Symbiotically, elevating the world’s awareness of you creates new opportunities for networking.

Keep in mind that employers and recruiters aren’t just looking for how many times your name pops up in a Google search. They’re also interested in how positive your online image is. Thus, you need to be very careful of how you project yourself online. The Internet is a highly public medium, and personal information floating out there in cyberspace about your political affiliation, religious preference, and even your family, could unfortunately work against you. A comment that you innocently post to an online discussion group could be viewed negatively by a prospective employer. The advice of an anonymous contributor to a Web log is worth heeding: “Never post anything that you wouldn’t be willing to read on the front page of the New York Times.”

A New York resume writer, for example, tells the story of submitting names of two executives to a recruiter who was unimpressed with both candidates one because his name was nowhere to be found on the Web, and the other because his published-online controversial political views turned the recruiter off. Another career expert tells of trying to look up an old colleague and finding only outdated information on him on the Web. Had he ensured that his online information was current and visible, the career guru would have told him about a great job opportunity

Before we get into ways you can pump up your online image, try this exercise: Take about a minute to write down what you are most known for. In what area(s) could you offer yourself as an expert? Ideally you are considered an expert in some area of your career or professional life, but hobbies and interests can be fair game, too.

And that brings us to the first way to get your name out there:
 
1.  Be known for your expertise. Offer yourself as an expert to the media. Contact local, regional and if you’re really hot stuff national newspaper, magazine, and online editors to let them know you’d be willing to be quoted on the topic(s) of your expertise. Your communication with editors could take the form of an e-mail, phone call, letter, or even a “media kit” with business card, resume, and list of story tips for which you’re qualified to serve as a source. I recently had a client, for example, who unfortunately did not receive tenure from the university at which he was a professor. He happens to be an expert on terrorism, however, and is often called upon by the media for quotes and insights. His visibility through this media exposure should help raise his currency as he seeks a new job.
 
2.   Be visible in professional, volunteer, and civic associations (such as the Chamber of Commerce and Rotary). Membership in these organizations is a great way to network, but to really get your name out there, run for office and volunteer to serve on committees.

3.   Speak in public. Organizations are always looking for speakers. For most smaller, local organizations, speakers are not paid, but they gain excellent exposure by talking about subjects of interests to the group membership. The same topic(s) in which you offer your expertise to the media can make fascinating fodder for presentations that will familiarize audiences with your talents and expertise. Your talk will likely be publicized, further enabling you to get your name out there. Oh, and even if it’s just rubber chicken, you’ll usually get a meal out of your speaking engagements. If you’re not comfortable as a public speaker, consider boosting your confidence by joining Toastmasters, which can be a great networking venue in itself.

4.   Offer your services to local colleges and universities. Make yourself available as a guest speaker for collegiate groups and clubs. Consider applying as an adjunct instructor. Many schools welcome professionals even those without terminal degrees to bring their real-world business experience to the classroom.
 
5.   Write articles. Just as groups seek speakers, both print and online publications often seek writers and columnists. The pay may be minimal or nonexistent, but having your name in print and your expertise disseminated can be priceless. Quintessential Careers’ own Career Doctor, Dr. Randall Hansen, for example, widened his horizons and became better known in his community when he offered his Career Doctor column to the local newspaper, the Daytona Beach News-Journal. Don’t forget about professional, trade, and industry publications in your field. Newsletters and magazines published by professional organizations may be clamoring for expertise like yours.

6.   Contribute to online discussion groups – but watch what you say. Speaking your mind in online groups, especially those connected with your professional field, certainly adds to your online presence, but don’t forget the very public nature of the Internet and the possibility that a prospective employer could read what you have to say.

7.    Serve on advisory boards and boards of directors. At some point in your career, you may be asked to participate on a corporate or nonprofit board, either in a decision-making or advisory capacity. If you’re looking for a terrific networking opportunity as well as a way to get your name out there jump at the invitation to join a board. Membership on some boards is by application rather than invitation; check into boards associated with your local government, for example. My county government in Volusia County, Florida, has several dozen advisory boards open to local residents from the Commission on the Status to Women to the Cultural Arts Advisory Board. Although board membership is a serious responsibility and time commitment (boards generally meet anywhere from quarterly to monthly), it can be a rewarding networking opportunity because of the accompanying clout and prestige. Board membership frequently affords you the chance to rub elbows with some of the most powerful members of the community or corporate world people you might not normally get to meet. To maximize the opportunity, don’t just sit there at meetings and say “yea” or “nay;” get actively involved. Volunteer for committees. The more you do for the board, the more important people you’ll be able to network with, and the better known you’ll become. The Web site BoardSeat is a good source of board vacancies.
 
8.   Consider a personal Web site with a portfolio. The foregoing ways to get your name out there are generally indirect paths to ensuring that your name will pop up in a Google search. For a more direct approach, a personal Web site with portfolio is the wave of the future. Having a portfolio presence on the Web shows employers that you are technically savvy, open to new trends, and poised on the cutting edge.
Consider the message you’d like to convey with your site and portfolio. Try this exercise: Take a few minutes to identify what your “brand” is. Think of three major trends that have spanned your career ongoing patterns for example, you’ve always been a people person. Try to convey these consistent branding messages throughout your portfolio.

A portfolio published on the Web enables you to include links to all kinds of items that tell more about you, your capabilities, and provide evidence of your accomplishments (writing samples, graphic-design samples, ad campaigns, photographs, PowerPoint presentations, reports, graphs, charts, lists of accomplishments and awards, executive summaries, case studies, testimonials, project deliverables, and even multimedia items, such as video and sound clips) that employers can access 24/7.

Be sure your Web site and portfolio look professional and avoid un-businesslike content. There’s a fine line between opening enough of a window into your personality to intrigue a prospective employer and turning a visitor off with inappropriate family photos or off-color humor. Still, you’ll often find some elements in a Web portfolio that you wouldn’t find in a typical resume accessible language and photos of the candidate, for example, which facilitate a sort of virtual networking through which employers can get to know prospective employees better. The portfolio provides a great opportunity for the candidate and employer to build rapport before an interview even takes place.

Final Thoughts
Most career experts agree that a portfolio alone or the other get-your-name-out-there activities alone may not do a lot to boost your “Googlability,” but an online portfolio plus efforts to raise your visibility can be a potent combination.

by Katharine Hansen, Ph.D.

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm

Taking Networking to the Next Level: Getting Your Name Out There – Have you ever Googled yourself?

You know… have you entered your name into the well-known Internet Google search engine to see how many times your name appears on the Web. To get a fairly accurate reading of how often your name appears, place it in quotation marks in Google, e.g., “Katharine Hansen.” If you have a very common name, add some other identifying information, such as the town you live in or your employer, e.g., “Katharine Hansen” “DeLand, FL” “The Career Guide.”

What does this little exercise have to do with networking? Even if you’ve never Googled yourself, it’s possible that an employer or recruiter has. It’s part of an emerging practice especially at senior and executive levels to find out how visible a prospective employee is. The number of citations or “hits” on Google is considered a reasonable gauge of a candidate’s visibility.

Networking has long been considered one of the most effective ways to job-hunt, in part because of the old adage that it’s not what you know but who you know. But increasingly, in the Information Age, success can spring not just from who you know but from who knows you.

This article explores a new type of passive networking with some very active elements. While some may consider getting your name out there to be a form of personal branding or horn-tooting, networking can provide avenues for raising your visibility and building your aura as an attractive candidate for hire. Symbiotically, elevating the world’s awareness of you creates new opportunities for networking.

Keep in mind that employers and recruiters aren’t just looking for how many times your name pops up in a Google search. They’re also interested in how positive your online image is. Thus, you need to be very careful of how you project yourself online. The Internet is a highly public medium, and personal information floating out there in cyberspace about your political affiliation, religious preference, and even your family, could unfortunately work against you. A comment that you innocently post to an online discussion group could be viewed negatively by a prospective employer. The advice of an anonymous contributor to a Web log is worth heeding: “Never post anything that you wouldn’t be willing to read on the front page of the New York Times.”

A New York resume writer, for example, tells the story of submitting names of two executives to a recruiter who was unimpressed with both candidates one because his name was nowhere to be found on the Web, and the other because his published-online controversial political views turned the recruiter off. Another career expert tells of trying to look up an old colleague and finding only outdated information on him on the Web. Had he ensured that his online information was current and visible, the career guru would have told him about a great job opportunity

Before we get into ways you can pump up your online image, try this exercise: Take about a minute to write down what you are most known for. In what area(s) could you offer yourself as an expert? Ideally you are considered an expert in some area of your career or professional life, but hobbies and interests can be fair game, too.

And that brings us to the first way to get your name out there:
 
1.  Be known for your expertise. Offer yourself as an expert to the media. Contact local, regional and if you’re really hot stuff national newspaper, magazine, and online editors to let them know you’d be willing to be quoted on the topic(s) of your expertise. Your communication with editors could take the form of an e-mail, phone call, letter, or even a “media kit” with business card, resume, and list of story tips for which you’re qualified to serve as a source. I recently had a client, for example, who unfortunately did not receive tenure from the university at which he was a professor. He happens to be an expert on terrorism, however, and is often called upon by the media for quotes and insights. His visibility through this media exposure should help raise his currency as he seeks a new job.
 
2.   Be visible in professional, volunteer, and civic associations (such as the Chamber of Commerce and Rotary). Membership in these organizations is a great way to network, but to really get your name out there, run for office and volunteer to serve on committees.

3.   Speak in public. Organizations are always looking for speakers. For most smaller, local organizations, speakers are not paid, but they gain excellent exposure by talking about subjects of interests to the group membership. The same topic(s) in which you offer your expertise to the media can make fascinating fodder for presentations that will familiarize audiences with your talents and expertise. Your talk will likely be publicized, further enabling you to get your name out there. Oh, and even if it’s just rubber chicken, you’ll usually get a meal out of your speaking engagements. If you’re not comfortable as a public speaker, consider boosting your confidence by joining Toastmasters, which can be a great networking venue in itself.

4.   Offer your services to local colleges and universities. Make yourself available as a guest speaker for collegiate groups and clubs. Consider applying as an adjunct instructor. Many schools welcome professionals even those without terminal degrees to bring their real-world business experience to the classroom.
 
5.   Write articles. Just as groups seek speakers, both print and online publications often seek writers and columnists. The pay may be minimal or nonexistent, but having your name in print and your expertise disseminated can be priceless. Quintessential Careers’ own Career Doctor, Dr. Randall Hansen, for example, widened his horizons and became better known in his community when he offered his Career Doctor column to the local newspaper, the Daytona Beach News-Journal. Don’t forget about professional, trade, and industry publications in your field. Newsletters and magazines published by professional organizations may be clamoring for expertise like yours.

6.   Contribute to online discussion groups – but watch what you say. Speaking your mind in online groups, especially those connected with your professional field, certainly adds to your online presence, but don’t forget the very public nature of the Internet and the possibility that a prospective employer could read what you have to say.

7.    Serve on advisory boards and boards of directors. At some point in your career, you may be asked to participate on a corporate or nonprofit board, either in a decision-making or advisory capacity. If you’re looking for a terrific networking opportunity as well as a way to get your name out there jump at the invitation to join a board. Membership on some boards is by application rather than invitation; check into boards associated with your local government, for example. My county government in Volusia County, Florida, has several dozen advisory boards open to local residents from the Commission on the Status to Women to the Cultural Arts Advisory Board. Although board membership is a serious responsibility and time commitment (boards generally meet anywhere from quarterly to monthly), it can be a rewarding networking opportunity because of the accompanying clout and prestige. Board membership frequently affords you the chance to rub elbows with some of the most powerful members of the community or corporate world people you might not normally get to meet. To maximize the opportunity, don’t just sit there at meetings and say “yea” or “nay;” get actively involved. Volunteer for committees. The more you do for the board, the more important people you’ll be able to network with, and the better known you’ll become. The Web site BoardSeat is a good source of board vacancies.
 
8. &nbsp
; Consider a personal Web site with a portfolio.
The foregoing ways to get your name out there are generally indirect paths to ensuring that your name will pop up in a Google search. For a more direct approach, a personal Web site with portfolio is the wave of the future. Having a portfolio presence on the Web shows employers that you are technically savvy, open to new trends, and poised on the cutting edge.
Consider the message you’d like to convey with your site and portfolio. Try this exercise: Take a few minutes to identify what your “brand” is. Think of three major trends that have spanned your career ongoing patterns for example, you’ve always been a people person. Try to convey these consistent branding messages throughout your portfolio.

A portfolio published on the Web enables you to include links to all kinds of items that tell more about you, your capabilities, and provide evidence of your accomplishments (writing samples, graphic-design samples, ad campaigns, photographs, PowerPoint presentations, reports, graphs, charts, lists of accomplishments and awards, executive summaries, case studies, testimonials, project deliverables, and even multimedia items, such as video and sound clips) that employers can access 24/7.

Be sure your Web site and portfolio look professional and avoid un-businesslike content. There’s a fine line between opening enough of a window into your personality to intrigue a prospective employer and turning a visitor off with inappropriate family photos or off-color humor. Still, you’ll often find some elements in a Web portfolio that you wouldn’t find in a typical resume accessible language and photos of the candidate, for example, which facilitate a sort of virtual networking through which employers can get to know prospective employees better. The portfolio provides a great opportunity for the candidate and employer to build rapport before an interview even takes place.

Final Thoughts
Most career experts agree that a portfolio alone or the other get-your-name-out-there activities alone may not do a lot to boost your “Googlability,” but an online portfolio plus efforts to raise your visibility can be a potent combination.

by Katharine Hansen, Ph.D.

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm

One-Week Job-Search: How to Lay the Foundation for a New Job in Just Seven Days

One of the hardest parts of job-hunting is often putting in enough effort to get the results you seek. You may respond to a few job ads, perhaps talk with a couple of people in your network, and possibly post your resume on a few job boards… but then you wait and nothing really happens.

If you are serious about finding a new job, then you need to put more time and dedication into the process and one way to accomplish this feat is to set aside a week to focus solely on your job-search. This process involves starting each day with a set of goals to accomplish and then spending the day doing your best to achieve them.

By following the guidelines in this article, you should be well on your way to laying the foundation for a new job.

Day 1 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to establish your job-search goals and to get organized. These two activities are essential to job-hunting success.

The ideal goal is one or more solid job leads by the end of the week, but you may have some other goals too, such as expanding your network of contacts and researching further educational or training opportunities.

Organization is essential. You can too easily waste time the entire week if you don’t step up the planning an organizing. Consider setting up some spreadsheets or logs for your network, for job leads, and for other aspects of your job search.

Day 2 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to make an inventory of your accomplishments, develop your USP, and analyze your network of contacts.

Before you can even begin to analyze your resume or work on your interviewing skills, you have to spend the time describing and categorizing accomplishments from all your relevant work experiences including school projects if you are a new grad. Review all your past experiences and brainstorm the impact you made how you performed the job differently than anyone else and what results you achieved. Whenever possible, try to quantify those accomplishments.

Once you’ve identified all your accomplishments, you can start on your unique selling proposition (USP). Your USP is the thing that makes you different better than all the other job-seekers. Your USP sets you apart. You’ll want to craft your USP into about a 10-15 word statement that you can use on your career marketing documents as well as in interviews. Some experts also refer to this statement as your elevator pitch.

The final part of your day should be analyzing and mapping your network of contacts. Your network is the people with whom you have a relationship family, friends, neighbors, colleagues, mentors, former bosses. And your network actually can extend to the networks of all the people you know. Your goal is to organize and prioritize your list of network contacts so that you’ll be prepared to contact the people who will most likely have access to or knowledge of job openings in your field.

Day 3 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to perfect your career marketing documents and spend more time on networking.

Now that you have identified your accomplishments, you can write a new resume or revise your existing resume. Actually, what you’ll be doing is perfecting your resume foundation because with each job opportunity, you’ll want to modify your resume to reflect the specific requirements of the job as well as use some of the words and phrases the prospective employer uses to describe the position. There simply is no such thing as one-resume-fits-all anymore.

Finally, if you have any concerns about your resume your most important job-hunting document consider having it critiqued by a resume professional.

The other important career marketing document is your cover letter. While the goal of your resume is to obtain an interview, the goal of your cover letter is simply to get your resume read. Your cover letter must be dynamic and concise. Your goal should be to develop a solid cover letter core that you will modify for each opportunity.

An oft-neglected marketing document is your list of references. Take the time now to review who you currently have listed, brainstorm some other possibilities, and most importantly, contact each person you have listed or want to list and be sure they are willing to be listed as a reference for you. Remember that you do not have to list former bosses as references; use people who know your work and will speak highly of it and of you.

The last part of your day should be spent on networking. First, send your newly revised resume to your key network members. Do not ask for a job, but ask for their help in identifying possible job opportunities. You should also look into ways to add new members to your network.

Day 4 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to exhaust all possible avenues for job leads.

First, follow-up with your network about any possible job opportunities because these leads will have the most likelihood for success.

Second, develop a list of prospective employers in your target area and then conduct an in-depth research campaign to learn more about each one, obtaining the name and contact information of the hiring manager for your area of expertise. Remember to check each organization’s job postings to see if there are any openings that match your qualifications.

Third, research and contact recruiters and temporary agencies that place job-seekers with your expertise.

Fourth, talk with the career services and alumni offices at your previous (or current) educational institutions and obtain possible networking and job leads.

Fifth, search some of the online job boards for possible leads. Don’t just search the major boards; consider geographic-specific or industry/profession niche boards.

Sixth, consider conducting some informational interviews. This networking tool often leads to the discovery of other job opportunities as well as strengthening/broadening your knowledge of a particular industry/profession and expanding your network.

Send or deliver cover letter and resume packets to the hiring manager for each of the leads you uncover.

Day 5 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to prepare for job interviews and follow-up on job leads.

The best way to secure a job offer is to perform strongly in job interviews, and the best way to perform strongly in job interviews is through preparation. The most basic preparation you can do is to review a list of typical job interview questions, such as you can find in our Job Interview Questions Database for Job-Seekers.

The next level of preparation is to uncover the types of interviews or interview questions that are most likely for your industry/profession. You can learn more here: Job Interviewing Resources for Job-Seekers.

The deepest level of preparation is to actually write your answers to expected interview questions. There’s considerable research that shows that this type of preparation helps you better retain the answers, thus helping you perform better in the actual interview. Just remember not to memorize your answers.

Finally, remember to format your answers to interview questions as short stories illustrative anecdotes that focus on your actions, accomplishments, and learning experiences.

And as the day progresses, remember to continue to track down and follow-up all job leads. Schedule interviews.

Day 6 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to continue following-up all job leads as well as pursue further career development.

Continue to work the phones, emails, and hit the pavement in your quest to uncover and follow-up on all job leads.

While you are waiting for the results of all your efforts, you may want to consider strengthening your interviewing preparation by developing a career portfolio. Your career portfolio contains an archive of job-search materials that help document your qualifications… your accomplishments. Portfolios often contain samples of your work, letters of accommodation/recommendation, awards and honors you’ve received, client testimonials, professional development, and much more.

Day 7 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to continue following-up all job leads, scheduling interviews, and considering other options to take.

Your persistence in tracking down job leads will pay off greatly, so keep at it.

You should now have several hot prospects on your radar.

However, if, at the end of the day, the end of the week, you have gotten little or no interest from all your hard work, you may want to consider working with a career professional to review all aspects of your job-search campaign. Sometimes an outsider can see and help you fix some minor issues that are holding you back from achieving your goals.

Finally, remember to keep your network in the loop and send thank-you notes to everyone who helped you in your job search.

Final Thoughts
The one-week job-search lays the foundation for a successful job-hunt, but you may not see the results of all your hard work for weeks or months after this intensive seven-day effort. You may get lucky and be in the right place at the right time, but if your one-week efforts do not lead to any solid job leads, the best advice is to keep at it. The average job-search takes months, so don’t get discouraged — just keep following-up all job leads and keep uncovering new ones.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

One-Week Job-Search: How to Lay the Foundation for a New Job in Just Seven Days

One of the hardest parts of job-hunting is often putting in enough effort to get the results you seek. You may respond to a few job ads, perhaps talk with a couple of people in your network, and possibly post your resume on a few job boards… but then you wait and nothing really happens.

If you are serious about finding a new job, then you need to put more time and dedication into the process and one way to accomplish this feat is to set aside a week to focus solely on your job-search. This process involves starting each day with a set of goals to accomplish and then spending the day doing your best to achieve them.

By following the guidelines in this article, you should be well on your way to laying the foundation for a new job.

Day 1 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to establish your job-search goals and to get organized. These two activities are essential to job-hunting success.

The ideal goal is one or more solid job leads by the end of the week, but you may have some other goals too, such as expanding your network of contacts and researching further educational or training opportunities.

Organization is essential. You can too easily waste time the entire week if you don’t step up the planning an organizing. Consider setting up some spreadsheets or logs for your network, for job leads, and for other aspects of your job search.

Day 2 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to make an inventory of your accomplishments, develop your USP, and analyze your network of contacts.

Before you can even begin to analyze your resume or work on your interviewing skills, you have to spend the time describing and categorizing accomplishments from all your relevant work experiences including school projects if you are a new grad. Review all your past experiences and brainstorm the impact you made how you performed the job differently than anyone else and what results you achieved. Whenever possible, try to quantify those accomplishments.

Once you’ve identified all your accomplishments, you can start on your unique selling proposition (USP). Your USP is the thing that makes you different better than all the other job-seekers. Your USP sets you apart. You’ll want to craft your USP into about a 10-15 word statement that you can use on your career marketing documents as well as in interviews. Some experts also refer to this statement as your elevator pitch.

The final part of your day should be analyzing and mapping your network of contacts. Your network is the people with whom you have a relationship family, friends, neighbors, colleagues, mentors, former bosses. And your network actually can extend to the networks of all the people you know. Your goal is to organize and prioritize your list of network contacts so that you’ll be prepared to contact the people who will most likely have access to or knowledge of job openings in your field.

Day 3 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to perfect your career marketing documents and spend more time on networking.

Now that you have identified your accomplishments, you can write a new resume or revise your existing resume. Actually, what you’ll be doing is perfecting your resume foundation because with each job opportunity, you’ll want to modify your resume to reflect the specific requirements of the job as well as use some of the words and phrases the prospective employer uses to describe the position. There simply is no such thing as one-resume-fits-all anymore.

Finally, if you have any concerns about your resume your most important job-hunting document consider having it critiqued by a resume professional.

The other important career marketing document is your cover letter. While the goal of your resume is to obtain an interview, the goal of your cover letter is simply to get your resume read. Your cover letter must be dynamic and concise. Your goal should be to develop a solid cover letter core that you will modify for each opportunity.

An oft-neglected marketing document is your list of references. Take the time now to review who you currently have listed, brainstorm some other possibilities, and most importantly, contact each person you have listed or want to list and be sure they are willing to be listed as a reference for you. Remember that you do not have to list former bosses as references; use people who know your work and will speak highly of it and of you.

The last part of your day should be spent on networking. First, send your newly revised resume to your key network members. Do not ask for a job, but ask for their help in identifying possible job opportunities. You should also look into ways to add new members to your network.

Day 4 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to exhaust all possible avenues for job leads.

First, follow-up with your network about any possible job opportunities because these leads will have the most likelihood for success.

Second, develop a list of prospective employers in your target area and then conduct an in-depth research campaign to learn more about each one, obtaining the name and contact information of the hiring manager for your area of expertise. Remember to check each organization’s job postings to see if there are any openings that match your qualifications.

Third, research and contact recruiters and temporary agencies that place job-seekers with your expertise.

Fourth, talk with the career services and alumni offices at your previous (or current) educational institutions and obtain possible networking and job leads.

Fifth, search some of the online job boards for possible leads. Don’t just search the major boards; consider geographic-specific or industry/profession niche boards.

Sixth, consider conducting some informational interviews. This networking tool often leads to the discovery of other job opportunities as well as strengthening/broadening your knowledge of a particular industry/profession and expanding your network.

Send or deliver cover letter and resume packets to the hiring manager for each of the leads you uncover.

Day 5 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to prepare for job interviews and follow-up on job leads.

The best way to secure a job offer is to perform strongly in job interviews, and the best way to perform strongly in job interviews is through preparation. The most basic preparation you can do is to review a list of typical job interview questions, such as you can find in our Job Interview Questions Database for Job-Seekers.

The next level of preparation is to uncover the types of interviews or interview questions that are most likely for your industry/profession. You can learn more here: Job Interviewing Resources for Job-Seekers.

The deepest level of preparation is to actually write your answers to expected interview questions. There’s considerable research that shows that this type of preparation helps you better retain the answers, thus helping you perform better in the actual interview. Just remember not to memorize your answers.

Finally, remember to format your answers to interview questions as short stories illustrative anecdotes that focus on your actions, accomplishments, and learning experiences.

And as the day progresses, remember to continue to track down and follow-up all job leads. Schedule interviews.

Day 6 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to continue following-up all job leads as well as pursue further career development.

Continue to work the phones, emails, and hit the
pavement in your quest to uncover and follow-up on all job leads.

While you are waiting for the results of all your efforts, you may want to consider strengthening your interviewing preparation by developing a career portfolio. Your career portfolio contains an archive of job-search materials that help document your qualifications… your accomplishments. Portfolios often contain samples of your work, letters of accommodation/recommendation, awards and honors you’ve received, client testimonials, professional development, and much more.

Day 7 of Your Job-Search
Your goal for this day is to continue following-up all job leads, scheduling interviews, and considering other options to take.

Your persistence in tracking down job leads will pay off greatly, so keep at it.

You should now have several hot prospects on your radar.

However, if, at the end of the day, the end of the week, you have gotten little or no interest from all your hard work, you may want to consider working with a career professional to review all aspects of your job-search campaign. Sometimes an outsider can see and help you fix some minor issues that are holding you back from achieving your goals.

Finally, remember to keep your network in the loop and send thank-you notes to everyone who helped you in your job search.

Final Thoughts
The one-week job-search lays the foundation for a successful job-hunt, but you may not see the results of all your hard work for weeks or months after this intensive seven-day effort. You may get lucky and be in the right place at the right time, but if your one-week efforts do not lead to any solid job leads, the best advice is to keep at it. The average job-search takes months, so don’t get discouraged — just keep following-up all job leads and keep uncovering new ones.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Resigning with Class: How to Diplomatically Resign From Your Job (with samples of Job Resignation Letters)

Are you preparing to resign from your current job? Some job-seekers have a hard time doing so, either because they love the job and their co-workers or because they can’t stand the job and can’t wait to leave. Curious? Then read on. This article is really two articles in one. The first part discusses the strategies behind making a graceful departure from your employer and the second part shows you how to write a letter of resignation.

Strategies for Resigning with Class
The most important job-search rule to remember when resigning from any job is that you never want to leave on bad terms if possible. Courtesy, etiquette, and professionalism go a long way. So, as much as you may want to tell off your boss or a co-worker, you should never burn any bridges. And don’t spend time bragging to co-workers about your great new opportunity. Job-hunting is a funny process, and you never know when you’ll run smack right into your former supervisor, a former co-worker, or a former employer through a merger or other circumstance.

So, once you are ready to announce your resignation, how can you make as smooth a transition from your current employer to your new one? You’ll again want to act professionally and follow company guidelines. Specifically, you need to consider:

  1. Timing. Give enough notice. The standard notice has traditionally been two to four weeks, but you should consult your employee handbook in case your employer expects more (or less) advance warning.
  2. Negotiating. Be sure to get a fair settlement for any outstanding salary, vacation (and sick and personal) days, and commission payments or other compensation due to you.
  3. Hiring. Offer to help your current employer find your replacement.
  4. Training. Volunteer to train or work with your replacement to show him or her “the ropes.”
  5. Working. Don’t disappear during the last weeks on the job. Stay an active member of the team. Avoid taking a short-timer’s attitude or aligning yourself with any discontented co-workers.
  6. Completing. Be sure to do your best to complete all open assignments and leave detailed progress reports for your supervisor and co-workers.
  7. Leaving. Before walking out the door for the last time, be sure you have contact information for key supervisors and co-workers that you want to keep part of your network of contacts and be sure to thank them again for their support.

    Here are some other issues you need to be prepared for once you announce your resignation:

    1. Escorted out of the building. In some industries and with some professions (such as sales), once an employee resigns, the employer asks the person to leave on the spot. Be prepared for this scenario by clearing personal files and removing personal software from your computer, removing personal information and belongings, and getting your workspace organized.
    2. Guilt from co-workers or your boss. It’s only natural, especially if you are leaving an unpleasant work environment, that your co-workers may be a bit envious and try to make you feel a little guilty. And no matter how great your boss may be, s/he may also make you feel a little guilty for “deserting” the team. Try not to let these things bother you; instead, concentrate on making the final weeks/days pleasant and professional.
    3. A counter-offer to entice you to stay. Be very wary of counteroffers. No matter how good it makes your ego feel to have your current employer respond with a counteroffer, most career experts advise against taking it because studies show that the vast majority of employees who accept counteroffers from current employers aren’t in those jobs for very long. Whether the employer admits it or not, your dedication will be questioned, and once that happens, your time on the job is limited. It’s better to tactfully decline the offer and focus on your new job with your new employer.
    4. An exit interview. Some employers like to have all departing employees meet with someone from the human resources department for an exit interview. Be careful but be professional. Some employers want to know the “real” reason you are leaving. Again, remember not to burn any bridges by saying anything negative or petty.

      Writing a Professional Resignation Letter
      What should you do once you’ve made the decision to take a job with another employer? You should take the time to write a letter of resignation to your current employer. It’s best to have written documentation of your resignation and planned last day of work.

      The most important thing to remember when writing your letter of resignation is to be professional there is just no sense in making enemies. Regardless of whether you loved or hated your job or your employer, the outcome should be the same: a short, polite, and professional letter stating your intention to leave.

      People leave their jobs for all sorts of reasons, and you certainly do not need to provide any details on why you are leaving the company. Resignation letters are a courtesy to your employer, so you simply need to state that you are leaving your current position to pursue other opportunities.

      As you are composing your letter, please again remember that your job history follows you around, and that frequently the world is much smaller than we think. You never ever want to leave on bad terms with any employer mainly because doing so could come back to haunt you later in your career.

      When should you submit your letter of resignation? And to whom? You should submit your resignation two or more weeks before your planned resignation date (depending on company/profession policy). And you should submit the letter/memo to your direct supervisor, with a copy to your human resources office.

      What exactly should you say in your letter of resignation? Here’s a basic outline:

      First Paragraph: State your intention of quitting your job and leaving the company. Give a specific last day of work.

      Second paragraph: If you feel comfortable, give a reason why you are leaving relocating, better job, career change, graduate school, etc. Or, reinforce your value by mentioning your key accomplishments with the employer (though doing so may trigger a counter offer).

      Third Paragraph: Thank both your supervisor and the company for the opportunities you had working for them. Be sure to end the letter on a positive note.

      Sample Job Resignation Letter and Memo

      Here are some sample resignation letters.

      1. Sample Job Resignation Letter
      2. Sample Job Resignation Memo

        Sample Job Resignation Letter:

        7 Shawnee Road
        Short Hills, NJ 07078
        201-555-0303

        Dr. Jill Fenimore
        Director of Pharmaceutical Sales
        Merck & Company, Inc.
        1 Merck Drive
        Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889

        Dear Jill,

        I am writing to you today to officially tender my resignation from Merck effective Friday, November 16.

        I never thought I would ever leave such a great company as Merck, but when the opportunity arose to own and operate my own vineyard in Napa, which as you know has always been a lifelong dream for me, I simply had to take advantage of it.

        I cannot say enough wonderful things about Merck, about all the people I’ve encountered in my years of service with the company, and especially about you and all the others on the sales team. Your leadership has taken us all to new levels, and I have appreciated all your personal and professional advice over the years. It’s my hope that we will stay in touch as I begin this new chapter in my life.

        If you have any questions, please ask. Thanks again for everything.

        Sincerely,

        Scott Hent
        ———————————————————-

        Sample Job Resignation Memo:

        To:         Mr. James Julia

        From:     Scott Hent

        Date:      November 16, 2009
        Subject:  Resignation

        *******************************************

        Dear Jim,

        It’s with somewhat of a heavy heart that I am submitting my written notice of resignation from Honeywell effective two weeks from today. My last day will be 11/30/09.

        The past few weeks have been a difficult time for me as I deliberated the direction of my career and whether it would be best served staying with Honeywell or moving to a new position with a new employer. I will be happy to answer any questions you may have, but I am not comfortable discussing my new position at this time.

        I will be happy to help train my replacement or do anything else you feel will help make the transition smoother.

        Thanks so much Jim. My experience at Honeywell has been rewarding and productive, and I wish only the best for you and for the company.
        ——————————————————

        One final note: Assuming you leave on a positive note with your supervisor and co-workers, once you have settled into your new job, remember to contact your former supervisor and co-workers and give them your updated contact information so that you can continue to keep them as a part of your job search network (because you never know when you’ll be job-hunting again).

        by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

        ————————————————————–
        If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

        Tag Cloud