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Archive for August, 2010

Top Ten Companies Hiring for Work from Home

Can you imagine how simple your life would be if you never had to drive to work? If you have the self-discipline to work from home, the right opportunity could help you get back those commute hours and gain some extra time each day to do whatever you want.

Wondering where to start? Here are 10 companies hiring for work from home right now:

1. Alpine Access
Website: http://www.alpineaccess.com
Job Title: Customer care professional

This forward-thinking company plans to hire 1,200 new employees in the first three months of 2009. “We look for people who are self-motivated, self-reliant problem solvers who have a strong work ethic,” says Remi Killeen, Recruitment Manager at Alpine Access. Besides offering the flexibility to work from home, Alpine Access, a virtual call center, provides health-care benefits, 401K, flexible work schedules and opportunities to grow. Each worker is an actual company employee with regular work hours and assignments.

2. HireMyMom.com
Website: http://www.hiremymom.com
Job Titles: Virtual assistant, professional blogger

HireMyMom.com is a Web-based job service designed especially for professional working mothers. Founder and President Lesley Spencer Pyle says the two most popular positions HireMyMom.com fills are professional blogger and virtual assistant. Bloggers write about their employer’s company, products, or services, often in response to user inquiries or industry discussion. They use specific “keywords” in their responses to get favorable Web search engine rankings. A virtual assistant is a professional office administrative assistant who can work from anywhere.

3. Sylvan Online
Website: http://www.sylvan.com
Job Title: On-line certified teacher

Do you have experience teaching but aren’t interested in managing an entire classroom? Sylvan Online may work for you. It’s a Web-based tutoring service that seeks certified teachers to tutor various subjects and levels. Job requirements include a current teaching certificate, a Windows-based PC and high-speed Internet access. Sylvan offers paid training on-line and opportunities range from 8 to 29 hours per week.

4. National Shopping Service
Website: http://www.nationalshoppingservice.com
Job Title: Mystery shopper/researcher

Do you love to shop? Do you like to share your opinion? You can make money doing both. A mystery shopper earns perks or a paycheck for helping companies learn about their products and customer service. Paycheck amounts range from “$5.00 to $25.00 for a 15- to 60-minute engagement,” says Matt Wozniak, president and CEO of National Shopping Service. “The vast majority of mystery shoppers do not mystery shop for a living, although we have had a few earning over $40,000 a year. It’s a great way to pick up a free pizza on your way to get the kids from soccer or get some free gasoline.”

5. oDesk
Website: http://www.oDesk.com
Job Title: Various professionals

If you have experience in software development, Web design, language translation and other computer-based careers, oDesk can help you get hired for work at home. Recently featured on “Good Morning America,” oDesk lets job seekers apply for contract jobs, large and small. Job seekers search job listings which include the job requirements, pay and estimated time commitments. “Our business has three components hire, manage and pay,” says Gary Swart, CEO of oDesk. Plus, you don’t have to submit invoices for your contract work, which saves time.

6. Working Solutions
Website: http://www.workingsolutions.com
Job Title: Transcriptionist, customer service representative

Are you a speedy and accurate typist? You might be interested in a contract position as a transcriptionist, someone who types down information from a recording, live reading, or conversation. Established in 1996, Working Solutions hires independent contract agents for various transcription and customer service assignments. You can earn up to $30 an hour if you have the right skill-set and experience.

7. Language Lab
Website: http://www.languagelab.com
Job Title: Teacher, actor, customer service representative

The best way to learn a language is to go someplace where you can practice with native speakers. Why not travel via the World Wide Web? Using a computer and Internet connection, Language Lab lets at-home students visit “English Town,” a virtual city where teachers help them learn English as a second language. Language Lab is looking to hire more English teachers. Shiv Rajendran, director of operations at Language Lab, says, “Teachers need to be native English speakers, Celta or Delta certified with five years of teaching experience.” Celta and Delta certifications are not college degrees, but post-high school certifications. The company also plans to hire actors and part-time customer service reps.

8. 1-800-FLOWERS
Website: http://www.1800flowers.com
Job Title: Customer service representative

If you have a phone headset, a way with people and, hopefully, a love of flowers, consider working for the long-established 1-800-FLOWERS. The company expects to hire temporary, full-time customer service representatives this year. It even promises competitive hourly rates plus a bonus at the end of the temporary assignment.

9. Aetna
Website: http://www.aetna.com
Job Title: Account manager, negotiator, customer service representative, nurse and more

From nurses to contract negotiators to account managers, Aetna is a nationwide company with a variety of telework-friendly jobs to offer. Whether you are medically savvy or are simply good with people on the phone, you could find a position with this reputable company that offers benefits and a possibility of a bonus. Even better, Aetna has been ranked 48th by BusinessWeek “Best Places to Launch a Career.”

10. Elance
Website: http://www.elance.com
Job Title: Legal, Web design, engineering, admin, marketing or writing professional

Elance creates a space where skilled professionals and would-be employers can bargain, haggle and place competitive bids for all sorts of projects. Elance works well for people who can provide video production, Web design, software engineering and other home-office-friendly services. If you have a computer-based skill, get yourself onto Elance.com and let the opportunities start rolling in. Plus, Elance does its best to ensure that the employers on their site are trustworthy and pay on time. And, employers rate workers so, the better work you provide, the better your chance of getting more gigs.
 

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By Molly Hallman

Where the Jobs Are: Growing States (Like Michigan — 27,800 jobs, Columbia 17,800 jobs, New York 10,500 jobs …….) and Booming Industries

If you’re looking for something, anything that might indicate a recovery, the latest US Department of Labor Statistics might give you a little hope. In essence, last month more states showed unemployment decreases than increases. To be exact, eighteen states and the District of Columbia recorded unemployment rate declines, while 14 states registered rate upswings. Eighteen states had no change at all. A full twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia reported unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier, while only 20 states posted increases, and 3 states had no change.

But wait…there’s more good news: Initial unemployment claims decreased by 31,000 last week, and in July, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 37 states and the District of Columbia and only declined in 13 states. The states that added the most jobs in July will probably surprise you.

Where the Jobs Are

  1. Michigan — added 27,800 jobs
  2. The District of Columbia — added 17,800 jobs
  3. Massachusetts — added 13,200 jobs
  4. New York — added 10,500 jobs
  5. Minnesota — added 9,800 jobs

North Dakota continued to register the lowest jobless rate at 3.6 percent, followed by South Dakota and Nebraska, 4.4 and 4.7 percent, respectively.

Where the Jobs Are NOT

  1. The states that lost the most jobs are:
  2. North Carolina — lost 29,800 jobs
  3. New Jersey — lost 21,200 jobs
  4. Illinois — lost 20,200 jobs
  5. California — lost 9,400 jobs
  6. Kentucky — lost 8,000 jobs

But the state with the absolute worst unemployment rate is Nevada which reached 14.3 percent in July. That rate also set a new series high. The states with the next highest rates were Michigan at 13.1 percent, and California at 12.3 percent.

Should You Move?
If it looks to you like you’re living in the worst possible state to find a job right now, don’t go packing your bags just yet. “You can search for a job anywhere online these days,” says employment expert Doug Arms, SVP and Chief Talent Officer of Ajilon, a specialty staffing firm owned by Adecco. He notes that at certain levels, companies are still paying for recruiting and interview trips, and they still have budgets to help you relocate.

But even if you’re not at that lofty level, Arms advises against permanently moving. “A lot of people moved out the California during the Gold Rush, and to work on the Hoover Dam, when it was being built. When they got there, they found things were not what they expected.”

Booming Industries
Rather than basing your job search on geographic indicators, Arms suggests searching within the professional sectors that are flourishing. For example, if you’re an accountant, bookkeeper, IT expert or transportation worker, instead of looking at traditional accounting, high tech or public transportation companies, try looking for a job in the private education sector (trade schools and private institutions) and in ambulatory health care (the baby boomers are aging, and increasingly need health care specialists to come to them). Both these industries need accountants, bookkeepers, IT specialists and transportation workers, in addition to educators and health care practitioners.

So, whether you’re living in a state like Michigan, which is finally adding jobs again, or North Carolina, which continues to lose them en masse, consider widening your job search to cover the industries that are flourishing everywhere. It’s estimated that there are more than three million jobs open right now, and someone’s got to get them, so why not you?
———————————-
By Lisa Johnson Mandell

Where the Jobs Are: Growing States (Like Michigan — 27,800 jobs, Columbia 17,800 jobs, New York 10,500 jobs …….) and Booming Industries

If you’re looking for something, anything that might indicate a recovery, the latest US Department of Labor Statistics might give you a little hope. In essence, last month more states showed unemployment decreases than increases. To be exact, eighteen states and the District of Columbia recorded unemployment rate declines, while 14 states registered rate upswings. Eighteen states had no change at all. A full twenty-seven states and the District of Columbia reported unemployment rate decreases from a year earlier, while only 20 states posted increases, and 3 states had no change.

But wait…there’s more good news: Initial unemployment claims decreased by 31,000 last week, and in July, nonfarm payroll employment increased in 37 states and the District of Columbia and only declined in 13 states. The states that added the most jobs in July will probably surprise you.

Where the Jobs Are

  1. Michigan — added 27,800 jobs
  2. The District of Columbia — added 17,800 jobs
  3. Massachusetts — added 13,200 jobs
  4. New York — added 10,500 jobs
  5. Minnesota — added 9,800 jobs

North Dakota continued to register the lowest jobless rate at 3.6 percent, followed by South Dakota and Nebraska, 4.4 and 4.7 percent, respectively.

Where the Jobs Are NOT

  1. The states that lost the most jobs are:
  2. North Carolina — lost 29,800 jobs
  3. New Jersey — lost 21,200 jobs
  4. Illinois — lost 20,200 jobs
  5. California — lost 9,400 jobs
  6. Kentucky — lost 8,000 jobs

But the state with the absolute worst unemployment rate is Nevada which reached 14.3 percent in July. That rate also set a new series high. The states with the next highest rates were Michigan at 13.1 percent, and California at 12.3 percent.

Should You Move?
If it looks to you like you’re living in the worst possible state to find a job right now, don’t go packing your bags just yet. “You can search for a job anywhere online these days,” says employment expert Doug Arms, SVP and Chief Talent Officer of Ajilon, a specialty staffing firm owned by Adecco. He notes that at certain levels, companies are still paying for recruiting and interview trips, and they still have budgets to help you relocate.

But even if you’re not at that lofty level, Arms advises against permanently moving. “A lot of people moved out the California during the Gold Rush, and to work on the Hoover Dam, when it was being built. When they got there, they found things were not what they expected.”

Booming Industries
Rather than basing your job search on geographic indicators, Arms suggests searching within the professional sectors that are flourishing. For example, if you’re an accountant, bookkeeper, IT expert or transportation worker, instead of looking at traditional accounting, high tech or public transportation companies, try looking for a job in the private education sector (trade schools and private institutions) and in ambulatory health care (the baby boomers are aging, and increasingly need health care specialists to come to them). Both these industries need accountants, bookkeepers, IT specialists and transportation workers, in addition to educators and health care practitioners.

So, whether you’re living in a state like Michigan, which is finally adding jobs again, or North Carolina, which continues to lose them en masse, consider widening your job search to cover the industries that are flourishing everywhere. It’s estimated that there are more than three million jobs open right now, and someone’s got to get them, so why not you?
———————————-
By Lisa Johnson Mandell

10 Expert Tips to Increase Your Salary Beyond Your Expectations

Determined to increase your salary? Follow these tips from Reesa Staten, vice president of communications and director of research at recruiting firm Robert Half International and Anna Ivey, a Boston-based career and admissions counselor, to increase your salary this year:

1. Get comfortable negotiating salary raises.
“Women fall behind here, because they generally aren’t as aggressive and fall farther and farther behind with their salaries. You can’t be shy about asking to be paid what you’re worth,” Ivey said. Along these lines, she said, it’s important to keep detailed documentation of your achievements.

2. Research and compare your salary.
Staten urges workers to make sure they know how much their skills are worth before they pursue a different position or a promotion. Compare your salary.

3. Become an indispensable expert.
Continue to learn about your line of work, so that you stay current with trends and developments. Your strategy might include going to industry conferences, reading industry publications or setting up regular lunch meetings with others in your field to exchange information and ideas. This is a key to increasing your salary.

4. Make yourself visible.
Network and mingle, making sure you are continually visible to others in your industry and your workplace. At work, take on difficult challenges and make sure that management is aware of your contributions.

5. Update your skills.
Consider training or certifications that could lead to a promotion. “In some companies, if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree, you can’t advance to the next level. Some jobs require an MBA; get as much education as possible,” Staten said. Search for online learning that could help increase your salary.

6. If you return to school, make sure that it will pay off.
Ivey said it’s important to investigate degree programs before launching into one that might not increase your salary and could end up costing you more in the long-run. Also, find out what continuing education benefits are offered by your employer. You may be able to “earn more” by getting your employer to cover tuition costs. Research the best college degrees for higher earnings.

7. Absorb and adapt to new methods.
“Things are changing quickly; what is state of the art now will be obsolete 10 years from now,” Staten said. When things change at work instead of getting grumpy, be the first to jump on board. Your enthusiasm for change and adaptability to new systems and ideas are to how your employer values you and could lead to a salary increase.

8. Be receptive to criticism.
Constructive criticism can help you improve your performance, Ivey said. Not only is it important to be able to gracefully accept criticism from your coworkers and boss, but integrating that feedback into your work can win you points and opportunities for promotion.

9. Sharpen your communication skills.
“I don’t care what role you’re in. If you can read and speak well, you are way ahead of the pack,” Ivey said.

10. Get comfortable with math.
“A lot of people coast through college without number knowledge just basic knowledge, like how to read a financial statement. We live in a Sarbanes-Oxley [SOX] now. If you work in a publicly traded company, you will be affected by SOX. Accounting is a great skill to have in your tool set,” Ivey said, referring to the federal law that tightened corporate governance standards.
————————-
By Kristina Cowan

————————————————————–
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

10 Expert Tips to Increase Your Salary Beyond Your Expectations

Determined to increase your salary? Follow these tips from Reesa Staten, vice president of communications and director of research at recruiting firm Robert Half International and Anna Ivey, a Boston-based career and admissions counselor, to increase your salary this year:

1. Get comfortable negotiating salary raises.
“Women fall behind here, because they generally aren’t as aggressive and fall farther and farther behind with their salaries. You can’t be shy about asking to be paid what you’re worth,” Ivey said. Along these lines, she said, it’s important to keep detailed documentation of your achievements.

2. Research and compare your salary.
Staten urges workers to make sure they know how much their skills are worth before they pursue a different position or a promotion. Compare your salary.

3. Become an indispensable expert.
Continue to learn about your line of work, so that you stay current with trends and developments. Your strategy might include going to industry conferences, reading industry publications or setting up regular lunch meetings with others in your field to exchange information and ideas. This is a key to increasing your salary.

4. Make yourself visible.
Network and mingle, making sure you are continually visible to others in your industry and your workplace. At work, take on difficult challenges and make sure that management is aware of your contributions.

5. Update your skills.
Consider training or certifications that could lead to a promotion. “In some companies, if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree, you can’t advance to the next level. Some jobs require an MBA; get as much education as possible,” Staten said. Search for online learning that could help increase your salary.

6. If you return to school, make sure that it will pay off.
Ivey said it’s important to investigate degree programs before launching into one that might not increase your salary and could end up costing you more in the long-run. Also, find out what continuing education benefits are offered by your employer. You may be able to “earn more” by getting your employer to cover tuition costs. Research the best college degrees for higher earnings.

7. Absorb and adapt to new methods.
“Things are changing quickly; what is state of the art now will be obsolete 10 years from now,” Staten said. When things change at work instead of getting grumpy, be the first to jump on board. Your enthusiasm for change and adaptability to new systems and ideas are to how your employer values you and could lead to a salary increase.

8. Be receptive to criticism.
Constructive criticism can help you improve your performance, Ivey said. Not only is it important to be able to gracefully accept criticism from your coworkers and boss, but integrating that feedback into your work can win you points and opportunities for promotion.

9. Sharpen your communication skills.
“I don’t care what role you’re in. If you can read and speak well, you are way ahead of the pack,” Ivey said.

10. Get comfortable with math.
“A lot of people coast through college without number knowledge just basic knowledge, like how to read a financial statement. We live in a Sarbanes-Oxley [SOX] now. If you work in a publicly traded company, you will be affected by SOX. Accounting is a great skill to have in your tool set,” Ivey said, referring to the federal law that tightened corporate governance standards.
————————-
By Kristina Cowan

————————————————————–
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Top 25 Cities for Your Career Boost – Just curious to see where your city ranks?

Now more than ever, it’s important to get the best bang for your buck. And there’s no question about it when it comes to value, not every U.S. city is created equally.
Why chase a great salary if your rent swallows most of it, unemployment is skyrocketing and you spend two hours a day just to get to and from work?
So, which cities offer the most overall value this year?
Excelle has come up with the top 25 and some may surprise you! After examining various city lists, weighing the rankings and taking note of our personal opinions, we’ve produced a list of cities that’s sure to offer something for everyone.
Our Criteria:
We looked at cities’ growth rates, average salaries and costs of living.
We factored in average commute time which, according to experts, has a colossal impact on your overall happiness.
We looked not only at unemployment figures, but also at the rate that unemployment has actually increased.
Thinking of relocating for better job prospects? Need to compare two top contenders? Just curious to see where your city ranks? We’ve got you covered. Read on!

 

1. Austin, TX

Population: 743,074
Average Salary: $41,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 51
Average Commute Time: 21.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 6
Unemployment Rate: 6.3

Austin tops our list with robust projected job growth and one of the lowest changes in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. The city has enjoyed a recent explosion of high-tech entrepreneurism, and its two largest employers the state government and the University of Texas are expected to add a couple thousand jobs this year. A “best cities” list veteran, Austin’s our top pick!

 

2. San Antonio, TX:

Population: 1,328,984
Average Salary: $34,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 29
Average Commute Time: 22.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 20
Unemployment Rate: 6.0
The second largest city in Texas (and on our list!), San Antonio has one of the most solid salary to cost of living ratios in the country and has seen the lowest change in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. Its projected job growth is extremely promising and consistently high-performing, with plenty of opportunity in the education, health care, manufacturing, government and service sectors. Famous for its River Walk, the Alamo and Tejano culture, San Antonio’s tourism also continues to thrive despite a down economy.

 

3. Salt Lake City, UT

Population: 180,651
Average Salary: $39,590
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 41
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 36
Unemployment Rate: 5.2
Service-oriented Salt Lake City is not only home to the headquarters of the Mormon Church but is also the nation’s largest industrial banking center. With stimulus from seasonal outdoor recreation tourism and a recent rebound in information-sector jobs, Salt Lake City has high expectations for job growth both now and after the economy recovers.
Offering better employment conditions than most other large cities, Utah’s biggest city boasts the lowest unemployment rate and the second lowest average commute time on our list boosting it right near the top.

 

4. Oklahoma City, OK

Population: 547,274
Average Salary: $35,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 15
Average Commute Time: 18.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 44
Unemployment Rate: 5.6
Ranked by Forbes magazine as 2008’s most recession-proof American city, Oklahoma City is still bustling with the prospect of significant job growth. With last year’s up trend in the leisure and hospitality sector as well as employment increases in natural resources, wholesale, mining and construction, Oklahoma’s capital city has managed to hold steady with an impressively low change in unemployment rate since the recession’s outbreak. Our #4 pick remains a center for government and energy exploration while also continuing to foster positive working environments, boasting an exceptionally low average commute time for workers and a sensible income to cost of living ratio.

 

5. Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Area, NC

Population: 497,602
Average Salary: $40,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 46
Average Commute Time: 20.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 38
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
 
One of the nation’s top areas for overall growth, Raleigh-Cary shines with expected job growth in technology, tourism and academia. Home to one of the largest high-technology R&D centers in the world, our #5 pick is becoming a preferred location for cutting-edge technology and manufacturing firms. Its relatively low income to cost of living ratio and potential for growth definitely place it in the top tier.

 

6. Seattle, WA

Population: 594,210
Average Salary: $49,890
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 79
Average Commute Time: 25.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 34
Unemployment Rate: 8.7
The home to many prominent corporate headquarters including those of Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft and Amazon.com Seattle is Washington state’s largest city and the region’s major economic, cultural and educational center. While the cost of living is a little on the high side, our #6 city has a particularly promising job outlook in alternative energy development and software engineering.
Bonus fun fact: Seattle buys more sunglasses per capita than any city in the US.

 

7. Rochester, NY

Population: 206,759
Average Salary: $40,660
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 3
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 137
Unemployment Rate: 8.5
Rochester is home to several Fortune 1000 companies including the largest wine company in the world, Constellation Brands, and photo experts Eastman Kodak  as well as several national and regional companies. With the second best income to cost of living ratio on our list as well as boasting the lowest commute time, this city is a solid choice.
Bonus fun fact: Rochester is known as the world capital of imaging.

 

8. Portland, OR

Population: 550,396
Average Salary: $43,370
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 58
Average Commute Time: 22.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 55
Unemployment Rate: 10.7
Historically, Portland has had a long-standing association with high-tech industries. According to City-Data.com, more than 1,200 tech companies currently operate in Portland, and, in 2004, microcomputer components manufacturer Intel was the city’s largest employer. The city has also seen consistent growth in the education and health-services sectors, helping the area maintain its high growth ratings despite significant decreases in employment in the natural resources, mining and construction sectors.
 
Bonus fun fact: Portland has the largest independent book store in the world.

 

9. Denver, CO

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $45,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 47
Average Commute Time: 22.6 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 113
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
Emphasizing employment in air transportation, telecommunications, aerospace and manufacturing, Denver is a major energy research center and the regional headquarters for government agencies. Its bustling downtown financial district is also considered the “Wall Street of the Rockies,” housing both major national and international banks. And that’s not all Denver is 346 miles west of the exact geographic center of the country, placing it in a great spot for future economic development and growth.
Bonus fun fact: Denver is the only city ever to turn down the Olympics.

 

10. Honolulu, HI

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $41,250
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 93
Average Commute Time: 22.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 132
Unemployment Rate: 5.4
More than just sun, sand, surf and volcanoes, Hawaii’s capital city boasts the second lowest unemployment rate on our list. The city is heavily focused in government; trade, transportation and utilities; leisure and hospitality; and professional and business services. One-fifth of the land is actually zoned for agriculture and, despite ongoing residential and commercial development, diversified agriculture and aquaculture have seen steady upward trends in recent years.
Bonus fun fact: President Obama was born here.

 

11. Nashville, TN

Population: 590,807
Average Salary: $36,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 39
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 153
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
As a leader in finance and insurance, health care, music and entertainment, publishing, transportation technology, higher education, biotechnology, plastics, and tourism and conventions, the economic diversity of America’s country music capital strengthens itself from the inside out. Its income to cost of living ratio is close to the best, especially given the city’s larger size, while the rise in unemployment has remained decently low.
 
Bonus fun fact: Nashville once had the highest number of churches per capita.

 

12. Virginia Beach, VA

Population: 433,746
Average Salary: $37,550
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 37
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 160
Unemployment Rate: 7.2
This beachfront city is best known for its thriving tourism, but is also home to 208 city parks, a national wildlife refuge, long-protected beach areas, three military bases, two universities and numerous historic sites. Major employers include Geico car insurance, Amerigroup health care, Virginia Beach-headquartered Lillian Vernon and Navy Exchange Service Command, while a large agribusiness sector gives our #12 city an extra boost, keeping it just in the top half.
 
Bonus fun fact: The Guinness Book of World Records lists Virginia Beach as having the longest pleasure beach in the world.

 

13. Kansas City, MO

Population: 450,375
Average Salary: $37,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 25
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 164
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
Kansas City houses the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies and several more Fortune 1000 corporations, providing a richly diverse economy with significant trade and transportation sectors, government programs and business services. Its cost of living has consistently been at or below the national average, boosting its rating on our list. Not only that, Forbes.com claims “there’s a ‘zone of sanity’ across the middle of the country, including the region around Kansas City, Mo., that largely avoided the real estate bubble and the subsequent foreclosure crisis.”
 
Bonus fun fact: The city is well known for its contributions to jazz music as well as the blues.

 

14. Pittsburgh, PA

Population: 311,218
Average Salary: $38,190
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 9
Average Commute Time: 21.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 169
Unemployment Rate: 7.6
With its former steel-manufacturing base and 446 bridges marking its skyline, Pittsburgh is unofficially considered both “The City of Bridges” and “The Steel City.” Our #14 pick is historically known for its heavy industry, but today its leading industries are healthcare, education, technology, robotics, fashion and financial services. Boasting the third best income to cost of living ratio and third smallest drop in unemployment rate, Pittsburgh comes Excelle-approved and recommended!
Bonus fun fact: Beloved TV personality Mr. Rodgers’ real neighborhood was the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

 

15. Charlotte, NC

Population: 671,588
Average Salary: $41,200
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 36
Average Commute Time: 25.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 125
Unemployment Rate: 11.7
Home to the nation’s largest financial asset – Bank of America – as well as a number of Fortune 500 companies, this comfortable North Carolina city offers a solid salary to cost of living ratio. However, this has also left it more vulnerable to the economic downturn. It would have scored higher on our list, were it not for the drastic increase in unemployment since last year (up 6%).
Bonus fun fact: Charlotte has two nuclear power plants!

 

16. Boston, MA

Population: 599,351
Average Salary: $51,730
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 80
Average Commute Time: 27.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 118
Unemployment Rate: 7.4
 
The unofficial “Capital of New England” is home to 21 four-year colleges and universities, making it a national center for higher education. These schools add to the local economy, not just by creating jobs but by attracting loads of high tech industries to the city. And at an average salary of $51,730, Boston boasts one of the highest incomes on our list. Living costs, however, are on the higher side, which pushes this iconic city farther down the list.
Bonus fun fact: The first telephone call was made in Boston.

 

17. Buffalo, NY

Population: 272,632
Average Salary: $38,640
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 1
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 174
Unemployment Rate: 9.6
Known for an abundance of greenery, a historic waterfront and a diverse cuisine, Buffalo has a lot to offer in terms of overall value. New York’s second largest city topped the list for cost-of-living per income ratio, and boasts one of the lowest average commute times in the nation. Unfortunately, this city also has one of highest unemployment rates on the list, so this year it ranks in the bottom half.
Bonus fun fact: Not surprisingly, buffalo wings were invented here!

 

18. Columbus, OH

Population: 747,755
Average Salary: $40,770
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 17
Average Commute Time: 20 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 178
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
 
Named after Christopher Columbus, the largest city in Ohio is also one of the largest cities on our list. The city boasts a robust economy, ranking in the top 10 in the nation. Government jobs provide the largest source of employment here, followed by its large higher education institutions. Columbus offers a relatively low cost of living and also boasts the lowest unemployment rate of all the 25 best value cities on this list.
 
Bonus fun fact: 50% of the United States population lives within a 500-mile radius of Columbus.

 

19. Indianapolis, IN

Population: 795,458
Average Salary: $39,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 12
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 197
Unemployment Rate: 8.2
Formerly a manufacturing-heavy city, Indianapolis has shifted to encompass a much more diversified economy today, its key industries include education, healthcare, tourism and finance. And if you love sports, Indianapolis may just be the place for you. The city hosts several major sporting events, including the Indianapolis 500, Brickyard 400 and men’s and women’s NCAA championships. It is also the fourth largest city on this list – below Philadelphia, San Antonio, and San Diego.
Bonus fun fact: Indianapolis has the largest children’s museum in the world.

 

20. St. Louis, MO

Population: 354,361
Average Salary: $40,630
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 23
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 179
Unemployment Rate: 9.2
Known as the city that marks the divide between the Eastern and Western United States, St. Louis is often called the “Gateway City.” It’s home to some of our nation’s largest public and privately held corporations  Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Scottrade, Energizer and Anheuser-Busch Breweries are just a few of its best known local companies. And it didn’t just make our own short list of great cities this charming city ranks among the whole world’s top 100 cities in terms of quality of life.
Bonus fun fact: The ice cream cone was invented in St. Louis.

 

21. Hartford, CT

Population: 124,563
Average Salary: $48,650
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 74
Average Commute Time: 33.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 199
Unemployment Rate: 8
Nicknamed the “Insurance Capital of the World,” Hartford is home to some of the world’s largest insurance company headquarters. It also boasts some of our nation’s oldest institutions the oldest art museum, park, and continuously published newspaper all hail from Hartford. With a high average salary and a relatively low cost of living, it’s no wonder this picturesque city made our cut.
Bonus fun fact: Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was discovered in Hartford.

 

22. Louisville, KY

Population: 256,231
Average Salary: $37,410
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 16
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 204
Unemployment Rate: 10
Louisville is a charming southern belle of a city with a derby full of galloping job opportunities.  Ranked at #16 for cost of living, Louisville offers country charm and city amenities.  The job growth is pacing around the national average, and the unemployment rate has gone up a reasonable 4.2% since the recession began.
Bonus fun fact: 90% of the United States’ disco balls are produced in Louisville.

 

23. Cincinnati, OH

Population: 332,458
Average Salary: $40,540
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 14
Average Commute Time: 21 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 207
Unemployment Rate: 8.9
Procter & Gamble, Sunny Delight, and Chiquita Brands International are amongst the impressive list of 10 Fortune 100 companies based in the this all-American, river-front city.  Its unemployment rate has not grown as much as other former industrial cities, gaining only 3.6% since before the economy collapsed.  With solid job growth potential, Cincinnati’s big Fortune 100 companies are slowly pulling the city back into a positive economic reality.
Bonus fun fact: Cincinnati was home to the first night baseball game.

 

24. Philadelphia, PA

Population: 1,449,634
Average Salary: $44,460
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 59
Average Commute Time: 29.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 176
Unemployment Rate: 8.0
The “City of Brotherly Love” and the largest city on our list has experienced a modest 3.1% uptick in unemployment, but has still maintained an unemployment rate much lower than that of comparable cities. A mecca for tourists and American history buffs, Philadelphia also promotes itself as a center for biomedical and pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, education and health sectors have emerged as principal drivers of the local economy, helping the city stay in our top 25.
Bonus fun fact: The lemon meringue pie was invented in Philadelphia.

 

25. San Diego, CA

Population: 1,266,731
Average Salary: $45,210
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 91
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 208
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
San Diego is a splashy surfers paradise in Southern California. If wealth were measured by sun and sand, San Diego would be the nation’s richest city. Unfortunately, the recession has burned San Diego with a 3.8% increase in unemployment. Still, the city enjoys a mean income of over $45,000 and a top-25 ranking amongst the nation’s best cities for job growth. So grab your board and your resume because San Diego remains a promising place to work and an even better place to play.

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By Anna Hennings, Tania Khadder, Adam Starr, Alice Handley | Excelle of Monster 

————————————————————–

If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Top 25 Cities for Your Career Boost – Just curious to see where your city ranks?

Now more than ever, it’s important to get the best bang for your buck. And there’s no question about it when it comes to value, not every U.S. city is created equally.
Why chase a great salary if your rent swallows most of it, unemployment is skyrocketing and you spend two hours a day just to get to and from work?
So, which cities offer the most overall value this year?
Excelle has come up with the top 25 and some may surprise you! After examining various city lists, weighing the rankings and taking note of our personal opinions, we’ve produced a list of cities that’s sure to offer something for everyone.
Our Criteria:
We looked at cities’ growth rates, average salaries and costs of living.
We factored in average commute time which, according to experts, has a colossal impact on your overall happiness.
We looked not only at unemployment figures, but also at the rate that unemployment has actually increased.
Thinking of relocating for better job prospects? Need to compare two top contenders? Just curious to see where your city ranks? We’ve got you covered. Read on!

 

1. Austin, TX

Population: 743,074
Average Salary: $41,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 51
Average Commute Time: 21.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 6
Unemployment Rate: 6.3

Austin tops our list with robust projected job growth and one of the lowest changes in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. The city has enjoyed a recent explosion of high-tech entrepreneurism, and its two largest employers the state government and the University of Texas are expected to add a couple thousand jobs this year. A “best cities” list veteran, Austin’s our top pick!

 

2. San Antonio, TX:

Population: 1,328,984
Average Salary: $34,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 29
Average Commute Time: 22.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 20
Unemployment Rate: 6.0
The second largest city in Texas (and on our list!), San Antonio has one of the most solid salary to cost of living ratios in the country and has seen the lowest change in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. Its projected job growth is extremely promising and consistently high-performing, with plenty of opportunity in the education, health care, manufacturing, government and service sectors. Famous for its River Walk, the Alamo and Tejano culture, San Antonio’s tourism also continues to thrive despite a down economy.

 

3. Salt Lake City, UT

Population: 180,651
Average Salary: $39,590
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 41
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 36
Unemployment Rate: 5.2
Service-oriented Salt Lake City is not only home to the headquarters of the Mormon Church but is also the nation’s largest industrial banking center. With stimulus from seasonal outdoor recreation tourism and a recent rebound in information-sector jobs, Salt Lake City has high expectations for job growth both now and after the economy recovers.
Offering better employment conditions than most other large cities, Utah’s biggest city boasts the lowest unemployment rate and the second lowest average commute time on our list boosting it right near the top.

 

4. Oklahoma City, OK

Population: 547,274
Average Salary: $35,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 15
Average Commute Time: 18.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 44
Unemployment Rate: 5.6
Ranked by Forbes magazine as 2008’s most recession-proof American city, Oklahoma City is still bustling with the prospect of significant job growth. With last year’s up trend in the leisure and hospitality sector as well as employment increases in natural resources, wholesale, mining and construction, Oklahoma’s capital city has managed to hold steady with an impressively low change in unemployment rate since the recession’s outbreak. Our #4 pick remains a center for government and energy exploration while also continuing to foster positive working environments, boasting an exceptionally low average commute time for workers and a sensible income to cost of living ratio.

 

5. Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Area, NC

Population: 497,602
Average Salary: $40,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 46
Average Commute Time: 20.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 38
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
 
One of the nation’s top areas for overall growth, Raleigh-Cary shines with expected job growth in technology, tourism and academia. Home to one of the largest high-technology R&D; centers in the world, our #5 pick is becoming a preferred location for cutting-edge technology and manufacturing firms. Its relatively low income to cost of living ratio and potential for growth definitely place it in the top tie
r.

 

6. Seattle, WA

Population: 594,210
Average Salary: $49,890
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 79
Average Commute Time: 25.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 34
Unemployment Rate: 8.7
The home to many prominent corporate headquarters including those of Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft and Amazon.com Seattle is Washington state’s largest city and the region’s major economic, cultural and educational center. While the cost of living is a little on the high side, our #6 city has a particularly promising job outlook in alternative energy development and software engineering.
Bonus fun fact: Seattle buys more sunglasses per capita than any city in the US.

 

7. Rochester, NY

Population: 206,759
Average Salary: $40,660
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 3
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 137
Unemployment Rate: 8.5
Rochester is home to several Fortune 1000 companies including the largest wine company in the world, Constellation Brands, and photo experts Eastman Kodak  as well as several national and regional companies. With the second best income to cost of living ratio on our list as well as boasting the lowest commute time, this city is a solid choice.
Bonus fun fact: Rochester is known as the world capital of imaging.

 

8. Portland, OR

Population: 550,396
Average Salary: $43,370
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 58
Average Commute Time: 22.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 55
Unemployment Rate: 10.7
Historically, Portland has had a long-standing association with high-tech industries. According to City-Data.com, more than 1,200 tech companies currently operate in Portland, and, in 2004, microcomputer components manufacturer Intel was the city’s largest employer. The city has also seen consistent growth in the education and health-services sectors, helping the area maintain its high growth ratings despite significant decreases in employment in the natural resources, mining and construction sectors.
 
Bonus fun fact: Portland has the largest independent book store in the world.

 

9. Denver, CO

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $45,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 47
Average Commute Time: 22.6 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 113
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
Emphasizing employment in air transportation, telecommunications, aerospace and manufacturing, Denver is a major energy research center and the regional headquarters for government agencies. Its bustling downtown financial district is also considered the “Wall Street of the Rockies,” housing both major national and international banks. And that’s not all Denver is 346 miles west of the exact geographic center of the country, placing it in a great spot for future economic development and growth.
Bonus fun fact: Denver is the only city ever to turn down the Olympics.

 

10. Honolulu, HI

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $41,250
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 93
Average Commute Time: 22.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 132
Unemployment Rate: 5.4
More than just sun, sand, surf and volcanoes, Hawaii’s capital city boasts the second lowest unemployment rate on our list. The city is heavily focused in government; trade, transportation and utilities; leisure and hospitality; and professional and business services. One-fifth of the land is actually zoned for agriculture and, despite ongoing residential and commercial development, diversified agriculture and aquaculture have seen steady upward trends in recent years.
Bonus fun fact: President Obama was born here.

 

11. Nashville, TN

Population: 590,807
Average Salary: $36,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 39
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 153
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
As a leader in finance and insurance, health care, music and entertainment, publishing, transportation technology, higher education, biotechnology, plastics, and tourism and conventions, the economic diversity of America’s country music capital strengthens itself from the inside out. Its income to cost of living ratio is close to the best, especially given the city’s larger size, while the rise in unemployment has remained decently low.
 
Bonus fun fact: Nashville once had the highest number of churches per capita.

 

12. Virginia Beach, VA

Population: 433,746
Average Salary: $37,550
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 37
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 160
Unemployment Rate: 7.2
This beachfront city is best known for its thriving tourism, but is also home to 208 city parks, a national wildlife refuge, long-protected beach areas, three military bases, two universities and numerous historic sites. Major employers include Geico car insurance, Amerigroup health care, Virginia Beach-headquartered Lillian Vernon and Navy Exchange Service Command, while a large agribusiness sector gives our #12 city an extra boost, keeping it just in the top half.
 
Bonus fun fact: The Guinness Book of World Records lists Virginia Beach as having the longest pleasure beach in the world.

 

13. Kansas City, MO

Population: 450,375
Average Salary: $37,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 25
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 164
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
Kansas City houses the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies and several more Fortune 1000 corporations, providing a richly diverse economy with significant trade and transportation sectors, government programs and business services. Its cost of living has consistently been at or below the national average, boosting its rating on our list. Not only that, Forbes.com claims “there’s a ‘zone of sanity’ across the middle of the country, including the region around Kansas City, Mo., that largely avoided the real estate bubble and the subsequent foreclosure crisis.”
 
Bonus fun fact: The city is well known for its contributions to jazz music as well as the blues.

 

14. Pittsburgh, PA

Population: 311,218
Average Salary: $38,190
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 9
Average Commute Time: 21.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 169
Unemployment Rate: 7.6
With its former steel-manufacturing base and 446 bridges marking its skyline, Pittsburgh is unofficially considered both “The City of Bridges” and “The Steel City.” Our #14 pick is historically known for its heavy industry, but today its leading industries are healthcare, education, technology, robotics, fashion and financial services. Boasting the third best income to cost of living ratio and third smallest drop in unemployment rate, Pittsburgh comes Excelle-approved and recommended!
Bonus fun fact: Beloved TV personality Mr. Rodgers’ real neighborhood was the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

 

15. Charlotte, NC

Population: 671,588
Average Salary: $41,200
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 36
Average Commute Time: 25.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 125
Unemployment Rate: 11.7
Home to the nation’s largest financial asset – Bank of America – as well as a number of Fortune 500 companies, this comfortable North Carolina city offers a solid salary to cost of living ratio. However, this has also left it more vulnerable to the economic downturn. It would have scored higher on our list, were it not for the drastic increase in unemployment since last year (up 6%).
Bonus fun fact: Charlotte has two nuclear power plants!

 

16. Boston, MA

Population: 599,351
Average Salary: $51,730
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 80
Average Commute Time: 27.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 118
Unemployment Rate: 7.4
 
The unofficial “Capital of New England” is home to 21 four-year colleges and universities, making it a national center for higher education. These schools add to the local economy, not just by creating jobs but by attracting loads of high tech industries to the city. And at an average salary of $51,730, Boston boasts one of the highest incomes on our list. Living costs, however, are on the higher side, which pushes this iconic city farther down the list.
Bonus fun fact: The first telephone call was made in Boston.

 

17. Buffalo, NY

Population: 272,632
Average Salary: $38,640
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 1
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 174
Unemployment Rate: 9.6
Known for an abundance of greenery, a historic waterfront and a diverse cuisine, Buffalo has a lot to offer in terms of overall value. New York’s second largest city topped the list for cost-of-living per income ratio, and boasts one of the lowest average commute times in the nation. Unfortunately, this city also has one of highest unemployment rates on the list, so this year it ranks in the bottom half.
Bonus fun fact: Not surprisingly, buffalo wings were invented here!

 

18. Columbus, OH

Population: 747,755
Average Salary: $40,770
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 17
Average Commute Time: 20 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 178
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
 
Named after Christopher Columbus, the largest city in Ohio is also one of the largest cities on our list. The city boasts a robust economy, ranking in the top 10 in the nation. Government jobs provide the largest source of employment here, followed by its large higher education institutions. Columbus offers a relatively low cost of living and also boasts the lowest unemployment rate of all the 25 best value cities on this list.
 
Bonus fun fact: 50% of the United States population lives within a 500-mile radius of Columbus.

 

19. Indianapolis, IN

Population: 795,458
Average Salary: $39,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 12
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 197
Unemployment Rate: 8.2
Formerly a manufacturing-heavy city, Indianapolis has shifted to encompass a much more diversified economy today, its key industries include education, healthcare, tourism and finance. And if you love sports, Indianapolis may just be the place for you. The city hosts several major sporting events, including the Indianapolis 500, Brickyard 400 and men’s and women’s NCAA championships. It is also the fourth largest city on this list – below Philadelphia, San Antonio, and San Diego.
Bonus fun fact: Indianapolis has the largest children’s museum in the world.

 

20. St. Louis, MO

Population: 354,361
Average Salary: $40,630
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 23
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 179
Unemployment Rate: 9.2
Known as the city that marks the divide between the Eastern and Western United States, St. Louis is often called the “Gateway City.” It’s home to some of our nation’s largest public and privately held corporations  Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Scottrade, Energizer and Anheuser-Busch Breweries are just a few of its best known local companies. And it didn’t just make our own short list of great cities this charming city ranks among the whole world’s top 100 cities in terms of quality of life.
Bonus fun fact: The ice cream cone was invented in St. Louis.

 

21. Hartford, CT

Population: 124,563
Average Salary: $48,650
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 74
Average Commute Time: 33.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 199
Unemployment Rate: 8
Nicknamed the “Insurance Capital of the World,” Hartford is home to some of the world’s largest insurance company headquarters. It also boasts some of our nation’s oldest institutions the oldest art museum, park, and continuously published newspaper all hail from Hartford. With a high average salary and a relatively low cost of living, it’s no wonder this picturesque city made our cut.
Bonus fun fact: Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was discovered in Hartford.

 

22. Louisville, KY

Population: 256,231
Average Salary: $37,410
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 16
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 204
Unemployment Rate: 10
Louisville is a charming southern belle of a city with a derby full of galloping job opportunities.  Ranked at #16 for cost of living, Louisville offers country charm and city amenities.  The job growth is pacing around the national average, and the unemployment rate has gone up a reasonable 4.2% since the recession began.
Bonus fun fact: 90% of the United States’ disco balls are produced in Louisville.

 

23. Cincinnati, OH

Population: 332,458
Average Salary: $40,540
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 14
Average Commute Time: 21 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 207
Unemployment Rate: 8.9
Procter & Gamble, Sunny Delight, and Chiquita Brands International are amongst the impressive list of 10 Fortune 100 companies based in the this all-Amer
ican, river-front city.  Its unemployment rate has not grown as much as other former industrial cities, gaining only 3.6% since before the economy collapsed.  With solid job growth potential, Cincinnati’s big Fortune 100 companies are slowly pulling the city back into a positive economic reality.
Bonus fun fact: Cincinnati was home to the first night baseball game.

 

24. Philadelphia, PA

Population: 1,449,634
Average Salary: $44,460
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 59
Average Commute Time: 29.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 176
Unemployment Rate: 8.0
The “City of Brotherly Love” and the largest city on our list has experienced a modest 3.1% uptick in unemployment, but has still maintained an unemployment rate much lower than that of comparable cities. A mecca for tourists and American history buffs, Philadelphia also promotes itself as a center for biomedical and pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, education and health sectors have emerged as principal drivers of the local economy, helping the city stay in our top 25.
Bonus fun fact: The lemon meringue pie was invented in Philadelphia.

 

25. San Diego, CA

Population: 1,266,731
Average Salary: $45,210
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 91
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 208
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
San Diego is a splashy surfers paradise in Southern California. If wealth were measured by sun and sand, San Diego would be the nation’s richest city. Unfortunately, the recession has burned San Diego with a 3.8% increase in unemployment. Still, the city enjoys a mean income of over $45,000 and a top-25 ranking amongst the nation’s best cities for job growth. So grab your board and your resume because San Diego remains a promising place to work and an even better place to play.

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By Anna Hennings, Tania Khadder, Adam Starr, Alice Handley | Excelle of Monster 

————————————————————–

If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

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