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Archive for August, 2010

10 Expert Tips to Increase Your Salary Beyond Your Expectations

Determined to increase your salary? Follow these tips from Reesa Staten, vice president of communications and director of research at recruiting firm Robert Half International and Anna Ivey, a Boston-based career and admissions counselor, to increase your salary this year:

1. Get comfortable negotiating salary raises.
“Women fall behind here, because they generally aren’t as aggressive and fall farther and farther behind with their salaries. You can’t be shy about asking to be paid what you’re worth,” Ivey said. Along these lines, she said, it’s important to keep detailed documentation of your achievements.

2. Research and compare your salary.
Staten urges workers to make sure they know how much their skills are worth before they pursue a different position or a promotion. Compare your salary.

3. Become an indispensable expert.
Continue to learn about your line of work, so that you stay current with trends and developments. Your strategy might include going to industry conferences, reading industry publications or setting up regular lunch meetings with others in your field to exchange information and ideas. This is a key to increasing your salary.

4. Make yourself visible.
Network and mingle, making sure you are continually visible to others in your industry and your workplace. At work, take on difficult challenges and make sure that management is aware of your contributions.

5. Update your skills.
Consider training or certifications that could lead to a promotion. “In some companies, if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree, you can’t advance to the next level. Some jobs require an MBA; get as much education as possible,” Staten said. Search for online learning that could help increase your salary.

6. If you return to school, make sure that it will pay off.
Ivey said it’s important to investigate degree programs before launching into one that might not increase your salary and could end up costing you more in the long-run. Also, find out what continuing education benefits are offered by your employer. You may be able to “earn more” by getting your employer to cover tuition costs. Research the best college degrees for higher earnings.

7. Absorb and adapt to new methods.
“Things are changing quickly; what is state of the art now will be obsolete 10 years from now,” Staten said. When things change at work instead of getting grumpy, be the first to jump on board. Your enthusiasm for change and adaptability to new systems and ideas are to how your employer values you and could lead to a salary increase.

8. Be receptive to criticism.
Constructive criticism can help you improve your performance, Ivey said. Not only is it important to be able to gracefully accept criticism from your coworkers and boss, but integrating that feedback into your work can win you points and opportunities for promotion.

9. Sharpen your communication skills.
“I don’t care what role you’re in. If you can read and speak well, you are way ahead of the pack,” Ivey said.

10. Get comfortable with math.
“A lot of people coast through college without number knowledge just basic knowledge, like how to read a financial statement. We live in a Sarbanes-Oxley [SOX] now. If you work in a publicly traded company, you will be affected by SOX. Accounting is a great skill to have in your tool set,” Ivey said, referring to the federal law that tightened corporate governance standards.
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By Kristina Cowan

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You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

10 Expert Tips to Increase Your Salary Beyond Your Expectations

Determined to increase your salary? Follow these tips from Reesa Staten, vice president of communications and director of research at recruiting firm Robert Half International and Anna Ivey, a Boston-based career and admissions counselor, to increase your salary this year:

1. Get comfortable negotiating salary raises.
“Women fall behind here, because they generally aren’t as aggressive and fall farther and farther behind with their salaries. You can’t be shy about asking to be paid what you’re worth,” Ivey said. Along these lines, she said, it’s important to keep detailed documentation of your achievements.

2. Research and compare your salary.
Staten urges workers to make sure they know how much their skills are worth before they pursue a different position or a promotion. Compare your salary.

3. Become an indispensable expert.
Continue to learn about your line of work, so that you stay current with trends and developments. Your strategy might include going to industry conferences, reading industry publications or setting up regular lunch meetings with others in your field to exchange information and ideas. This is a key to increasing your salary.

4. Make yourself visible.
Network and mingle, making sure you are continually visible to others in your industry and your workplace. At work, take on difficult challenges and make sure that management is aware of your contributions.

5. Update your skills.
Consider training or certifications that could lead to a promotion. “In some companies, if you don’t have a bachelor’s degree, you can’t advance to the next level. Some jobs require an MBA; get as much education as possible,” Staten said. Search for online learning that could help increase your salary.

6. If you return to school, make sure that it will pay off.
Ivey said it’s important to investigate degree programs before launching into one that might not increase your salary and could end up costing you more in the long-run. Also, find out what continuing education benefits are offered by your employer. You may be able to “earn more” by getting your employer to cover tuition costs. Research the best college degrees for higher earnings.

7. Absorb and adapt to new methods.
“Things are changing quickly; what is state of the art now will be obsolete 10 years from now,” Staten said. When things change at work instead of getting grumpy, be the first to jump on board. Your enthusiasm for change and adaptability to new systems and ideas are to how your employer values you and could lead to a salary increase.

8. Be receptive to criticism.
Constructive criticism can help you improve your performance, Ivey said. Not only is it important to be able to gracefully accept criticism from your coworkers and boss, but integrating that feedback into your work can win you points and opportunities for promotion.

9. Sharpen your communication skills.
“I don’t care what role you’re in. If you can read and speak well, you are way ahead of the pack,” Ivey said.

10. Get comfortable with math.
“A lot of people coast through college without number knowledge just basic knowledge, like how to read a financial statement. We live in a Sarbanes-Oxley [SOX] now. If you work in a publicly traded company, you will be affected by SOX. Accounting is a great skill to have in your tool set,” Ivey said, referring to the federal law that tightened corporate governance standards.
————————-
By Kristina Cowan

————————————————————–
You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Top 25 Cities for Your Career Boost – Just curious to see where your city ranks?

Now more than ever, it’s important to get the best bang for your buck. And there’s no question about it when it comes to value, not every U.S. city is created equally.
Why chase a great salary if your rent swallows most of it, unemployment is skyrocketing and you spend two hours a day just to get to and from work?
So, which cities offer the most overall value this year?
Excelle has come up with the top 25 and some may surprise you! After examining various city lists, weighing the rankings and taking note of our personal opinions, we’ve produced a list of cities that’s sure to offer something for everyone.
Our Criteria:
We looked at cities’ growth rates, average salaries and costs of living.
We factored in average commute time which, according to experts, has a colossal impact on your overall happiness.
We looked not only at unemployment figures, but also at the rate that unemployment has actually increased.
Thinking of relocating for better job prospects? Need to compare two top contenders? Just curious to see where your city ranks? We’ve got you covered. Read on!

 

1. Austin, TX

Population: 743,074
Average Salary: $41,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 51
Average Commute Time: 21.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 6
Unemployment Rate: 6.3

Austin tops our list with robust projected job growth and one of the lowest changes in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. The city has enjoyed a recent explosion of high-tech entrepreneurism, and its two largest employers the state government and the University of Texas are expected to add a couple thousand jobs this year. A “best cities” list veteran, Austin’s our top pick!

 

2. San Antonio, TX:

Population: 1,328,984
Average Salary: $34,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 29
Average Commute Time: 22.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 20
Unemployment Rate: 6.0
The second largest city in Texas (and on our list!), San Antonio has one of the most solid salary to cost of living ratios in the country and has seen the lowest change in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. Its projected job growth is extremely promising and consistently high-performing, with plenty of opportunity in the education, health care, manufacturing, government and service sectors. Famous for its River Walk, the Alamo and Tejano culture, San Antonio’s tourism also continues to thrive despite a down economy.

 

3. Salt Lake City, UT

Population: 180,651
Average Salary: $39,590
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 41
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 36
Unemployment Rate: 5.2
Service-oriented Salt Lake City is not only home to the headquarters of the Mormon Church but is also the nation’s largest industrial banking center. With stimulus from seasonal outdoor recreation tourism and a recent rebound in information-sector jobs, Salt Lake City has high expectations for job growth both now and after the economy recovers.
Offering better employment conditions than most other large cities, Utah’s biggest city boasts the lowest unemployment rate and the second lowest average commute time on our list boosting it right near the top.

 

4. Oklahoma City, OK

Population: 547,274
Average Salary: $35,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 15
Average Commute Time: 18.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 44
Unemployment Rate: 5.6
Ranked by Forbes magazine as 2008’s most recession-proof American city, Oklahoma City is still bustling with the prospect of significant job growth. With last year’s up trend in the leisure and hospitality sector as well as employment increases in natural resources, wholesale, mining and construction, Oklahoma’s capital city has managed to hold steady with an impressively low change in unemployment rate since the recession’s outbreak. Our #4 pick remains a center for government and energy exploration while also continuing to foster positive working environments, boasting an exceptionally low average commute time for workers and a sensible income to cost of living ratio.

 

5. Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Area, NC

Population: 497,602
Average Salary: $40,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 46
Average Commute Time: 20.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 38
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
 
One of the nation’s top areas for overall growth, Raleigh-Cary shines with expected job growth in technology, tourism and academia. Home to one of the largest high-technology R&D centers in the world, our #5 pick is becoming a preferred location for cutting-edge technology and manufacturing firms. Its relatively low income to cost of living ratio and potential for growth definitely place it in the top tier.

 

6. Seattle, WA

Population: 594,210
Average Salary: $49,890
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 79
Average Commute Time: 25.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 34
Unemployment Rate: 8.7
The home to many prominent corporate headquarters including those of Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft and Amazon.com Seattle is Washington state’s largest city and the region’s major economic, cultural and educational center. While the cost of living is a little on the high side, our #6 city has a particularly promising job outlook in alternative energy development and software engineering.
Bonus fun fact: Seattle buys more sunglasses per capita than any city in the US.

 

7. Rochester, NY

Population: 206,759
Average Salary: $40,660
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 3
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 137
Unemployment Rate: 8.5
Rochester is home to several Fortune 1000 companies including the largest wine company in the world, Constellation Brands, and photo experts Eastman Kodak  as well as several national and regional companies. With the second best income to cost of living ratio on our list as well as boasting the lowest commute time, this city is a solid choice.
Bonus fun fact: Rochester is known as the world capital of imaging.

 

8. Portland, OR

Population: 550,396
Average Salary: $43,370
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 58
Average Commute Time: 22.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 55
Unemployment Rate: 10.7
Historically, Portland has had a long-standing association with high-tech industries. According to City-Data.com, more than 1,200 tech companies currently operate in Portland, and, in 2004, microcomputer components manufacturer Intel was the city’s largest employer. The city has also seen consistent growth in the education and health-services sectors, helping the area maintain its high growth ratings despite significant decreases in employment in the natural resources, mining and construction sectors.
 
Bonus fun fact: Portland has the largest independent book store in the world.

 

9. Denver, CO

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $45,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 47
Average Commute Time: 22.6 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 113
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
Emphasizing employment in air transportation, telecommunications, aerospace and manufacturing, Denver is a major energy research center and the regional headquarters for government agencies. Its bustling downtown financial district is also considered the “Wall Street of the Rockies,” housing both major national and international banks. And that’s not all Denver is 346 miles west of the exact geographic center of the country, placing it in a great spot for future economic development and growth.
Bonus fun fact: Denver is the only city ever to turn down the Olympics.

 

10. Honolulu, HI

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $41,250
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 93
Average Commute Time: 22.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 132
Unemployment Rate: 5.4
More than just sun, sand, surf and volcanoes, Hawaii’s capital city boasts the second lowest unemployment rate on our list. The city is heavily focused in government; trade, transportation and utilities; leisure and hospitality; and professional and business services. One-fifth of the land is actually zoned for agriculture and, despite ongoing residential and commercial development, diversified agriculture and aquaculture have seen steady upward trends in recent years.
Bonus fun fact: President Obama was born here.

 

11. Nashville, TN

Population: 590,807
Average Salary: $36,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 39
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 153
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
As a leader in finance and insurance, health care, music and entertainment, publishing, transportation technology, higher education, biotechnology, plastics, and tourism and conventions, the economic diversity of America’s country music capital strengthens itself from the inside out. Its income to cost of living ratio is close to the best, especially given the city’s larger size, while the rise in unemployment has remained decently low.
 
Bonus fun fact: Nashville once had the highest number of churches per capita.

 

12. Virginia Beach, VA

Population: 433,746
Average Salary: $37,550
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 37
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 160
Unemployment Rate: 7.2
This beachfront city is best known for its thriving tourism, but is also home to 208 city parks, a national wildlife refuge, long-protected beach areas, three military bases, two universities and numerous historic sites. Major employers include Geico car insurance, Amerigroup health care, Virginia Beach-headquartered Lillian Vernon and Navy Exchange Service Command, while a large agribusiness sector gives our #12 city an extra boost, keeping it just in the top half.
 
Bonus fun fact: The Guinness Book of World Records lists Virginia Beach as having the longest pleasure beach in the world.

 

13. Kansas City, MO

Population: 450,375
Average Salary: $37,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 25
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 164
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
Kansas City houses the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies and several more Fortune 1000 corporations, providing a richly diverse economy with significant trade and transportation sectors, government programs and business services. Its cost of living has consistently been at or below the national average, boosting its rating on our list. Not only that, Forbes.com claims “there’s a ‘zone of sanity’ across the middle of the country, including the region around Kansas City, Mo., that largely avoided the real estate bubble and the subsequent foreclosure crisis.”
 
Bonus fun fact: The city is well known for its contributions to jazz music as well as the blues.

 

14. Pittsburgh, PA

Population: 311,218
Average Salary: $38,190
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 9
Average Commute Time: 21.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 169
Unemployment Rate: 7.6
With its former steel-manufacturing base and 446 bridges marking its skyline, Pittsburgh is unofficially considered both “The City of Bridges” and “The Steel City.” Our #14 pick is historically known for its heavy industry, but today its leading industries are healthcare, education, technology, robotics, fashion and financial services. Boasting the third best income to cost of living ratio and third smallest drop in unemployment rate, Pittsburgh comes Excelle-approved and recommended!
Bonus fun fact: Beloved TV personality Mr. Rodgers’ real neighborhood was the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

 

15. Charlotte, NC

Population: 671,588
Average Salary: $41,200
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 36
Average Commute Time: 25.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 125
Unemployment Rate: 11.7
Home to the nation’s largest financial asset – Bank of America – as well as a number of Fortune 500 companies, this comfortable North Carolina city offers a solid salary to cost of living ratio. However, this has also left it more vulnerable to the economic downturn. It would have scored higher on our list, were it not for the drastic increase in unemployment since last year (up 6%).
Bonus fun fact: Charlotte has two nuclear power plants!

 

16. Boston, MA

Population: 599,351
Average Salary: $51,730
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 80
Average Commute Time: 27.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 118
Unemployment Rate: 7.4
 
The unofficial “Capital of New England” is home to 21 four-year colleges and universities, making it a national center for higher education. These schools add to the local economy, not just by creating jobs but by attracting loads of high tech industries to the city. And at an average salary of $51,730, Boston boasts one of the highest incomes on our list. Living costs, however, are on the higher side, which pushes this iconic city farther down the list.
Bonus fun fact: The first telephone call was made in Boston.

 

17. Buffalo, NY

Population: 272,632
Average Salary: $38,640
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 1
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 174
Unemployment Rate: 9.6
Known for an abundance of greenery, a historic waterfront and a diverse cuisine, Buffalo has a lot to offer in terms of overall value. New York’s second largest city topped the list for cost-of-living per income ratio, and boasts one of the lowest average commute times in the nation. Unfortunately, this city also has one of highest unemployment rates on the list, so this year it ranks in the bottom half.
Bonus fun fact: Not surprisingly, buffalo wings were invented here!

 

18. Columbus, OH

Population: 747,755
Average Salary: $40,770
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 17
Average Commute Time: 20 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 178
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
 
Named after Christopher Columbus, the largest city in Ohio is also one of the largest cities on our list. The city boasts a robust economy, ranking in the top 10 in the nation. Government jobs provide the largest source of employment here, followed by its large higher education institutions. Columbus offers a relatively low cost of living and also boasts the lowest unemployment rate of all the 25 best value cities on this list.
 
Bonus fun fact: 50% of the United States population lives within a 500-mile radius of Columbus.

 

19. Indianapolis, IN

Population: 795,458
Average Salary: $39,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 12
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 197
Unemployment Rate: 8.2
Formerly a manufacturing-heavy city, Indianapolis has shifted to encompass a much more diversified economy today, its key industries include education, healthcare, tourism and finance. And if you love sports, Indianapolis may just be the place for you. The city hosts several major sporting events, including the Indianapolis 500, Brickyard 400 and men’s and women’s NCAA championships. It is also the fourth largest city on this list – below Philadelphia, San Antonio, and San Diego.
Bonus fun fact: Indianapolis has the largest children’s museum in the world.

 

20. St. Louis, MO

Population: 354,361
Average Salary: $40,630
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 23
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 179
Unemployment Rate: 9.2
Known as the city that marks the divide between the Eastern and Western United States, St. Louis is often called the “Gateway City.” It’s home to some of our nation’s largest public and privately held corporations  Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Scottrade, Energizer and Anheuser-Busch Breweries are just a few of its best known local companies. And it didn’t just make our own short list of great cities this charming city ranks among the whole world’s top 100 cities in terms of quality of life.
Bonus fun fact: The ice cream cone was invented in St. Louis.

 

21. Hartford, CT

Population: 124,563
Average Salary: $48,650
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 74
Average Commute Time: 33.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 199
Unemployment Rate: 8
Nicknamed the “Insurance Capital of the World,” Hartford is home to some of the world’s largest insurance company headquarters. It also boasts some of our nation’s oldest institutions the oldest art museum, park, and continuously published newspaper all hail from Hartford. With a high average salary and a relatively low cost of living, it’s no wonder this picturesque city made our cut.
Bonus fun fact: Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was discovered in Hartford.

 

22. Louisville, KY

Population: 256,231
Average Salary: $37,410
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 16
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 204
Unemployment Rate: 10
Louisville is a charming southern belle of a city with a derby full of galloping job opportunities.  Ranked at #16 for cost of living, Louisville offers country charm and city amenities.  The job growth is pacing around the national average, and the unemployment rate has gone up a reasonable 4.2% since the recession began.
Bonus fun fact: 90% of the United States’ disco balls are produced in Louisville.

 

23. Cincinnati, OH

Population: 332,458
Average Salary: $40,540
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 14
Average Commute Time: 21 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 207
Unemployment Rate: 8.9
Procter & Gamble, Sunny Delight, and Chiquita Brands International are amongst the impressive list of 10 Fortune 100 companies based in the this all-American, river-front city.  Its unemployment rate has not grown as much as other former industrial cities, gaining only 3.6% since before the economy collapsed.  With solid job growth potential, Cincinnati’s big Fortune 100 companies are slowly pulling the city back into a positive economic reality.
Bonus fun fact: Cincinnati was home to the first night baseball game.

 

24. Philadelphia, PA

Population: 1,449,634
Average Salary: $44,460
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 59
Average Commute Time: 29.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 176
Unemployment Rate: 8.0
The “City of Brotherly Love” and the largest city on our list has experienced a modest 3.1% uptick in unemployment, but has still maintained an unemployment rate much lower than that of comparable cities. A mecca for tourists and American history buffs, Philadelphia also promotes itself as a center for biomedical and pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, education and health sectors have emerged as principal drivers of the local economy, helping the city stay in our top 25.
Bonus fun fact: The lemon meringue pie was invented in Philadelphia.

 

25. San Diego, CA

Population: 1,266,731
Average Salary: $45,210
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 91
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 208
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
San Diego is a splashy surfers paradise in Southern California. If wealth were measured by sun and sand, San Diego would be the nation’s richest city. Unfortunately, the recession has burned San Diego with a 3.8% increase in unemployment. Still, the city enjoys a mean income of over $45,000 and a top-25 ranking amongst the nation’s best cities for job growth. So grab your board and your resume because San Diego remains a promising place to work and an even better place to play.

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By Anna Hennings, Tania Khadder, Adam Starr, Alice Handley | Excelle of Monster 

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Top 25 Cities for Your Career Boost – Just curious to see where your city ranks?

Now more than ever, it’s important to get the best bang for your buck. And there’s no question about it when it comes to value, not every U.S. city is created equally.
Why chase a great salary if your rent swallows most of it, unemployment is skyrocketing and you spend two hours a day just to get to and from work?
So, which cities offer the most overall value this year?
Excelle has come up with the top 25 and some may surprise you! After examining various city lists, weighing the rankings and taking note of our personal opinions, we’ve produced a list of cities that’s sure to offer something for everyone.
Our Criteria:
We looked at cities’ growth rates, average salaries and costs of living.
We factored in average commute time which, according to experts, has a colossal impact on your overall happiness.
We looked not only at unemployment figures, but also at the rate that unemployment has actually increased.
Thinking of relocating for better job prospects? Need to compare two top contenders? Just curious to see where your city ranks? We’ve got you covered. Read on!

 

1. Austin, TX

Population: 743,074
Average Salary: $41,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 51
Average Commute Time: 21.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 6
Unemployment Rate: 6.3

Austin tops our list with robust projected job growth and one of the lowest changes in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. The city has enjoyed a recent explosion of high-tech entrepreneurism, and its two largest employers the state government and the University of Texas are expected to add a couple thousand jobs this year. A “best cities” list veteran, Austin’s our top pick!

 

2. San Antonio, TX:

Population: 1,328,984
Average Salary: $34,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 29
Average Commute Time: 22.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 20
Unemployment Rate: 6.0
The second largest city in Texas (and on our list!), San Antonio has one of the most solid salary to cost of living ratios in the country and has seen the lowest change in unemployment rate since the onset of the recession. Its projected job growth is extremely promising and consistently high-performing, with plenty of opportunity in the education, health care, manufacturing, government and service sectors. Famous for its River Walk, the Alamo and Tejano culture, San Antonio’s tourism also continues to thrive despite a down economy.

 

3. Salt Lake City, UT

Population: 180,651
Average Salary: $39,590
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 41
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 36
Unemployment Rate: 5.2
Service-oriented Salt Lake City is not only home to the headquarters of the Mormon Church but is also the nation’s largest industrial banking center. With stimulus from seasonal outdoor recreation tourism and a recent rebound in information-sector jobs, Salt Lake City has high expectations for job growth both now and after the economy recovers.
Offering better employment conditions than most other large cities, Utah’s biggest city boasts the lowest unemployment rate and the second lowest average commute time on our list boosting it right near the top.

 

4. Oklahoma City, OK

Population: 547,274
Average Salary: $35,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 15
Average Commute Time: 18.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 44
Unemployment Rate: 5.6
Ranked by Forbes magazine as 2008’s most recession-proof American city, Oklahoma City is still bustling with the prospect of significant job growth. With last year’s up trend in the leisure and hospitality sector as well as employment increases in natural resources, wholesale, mining and construction, Oklahoma’s capital city has managed to hold steady with an impressively low change in unemployment rate since the recession’s outbreak. Our #4 pick remains a center for government and energy exploration while also continuing to foster positive working environments, boasting an exceptionally low average commute time for workers and a sensible income to cost of living ratio.

 

5. Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Area, NC

Population: 497,602
Average Salary: $40,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 46
Average Commute Time: 20.9 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 38
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
 
One of the nation’s top areas for overall growth, Raleigh-Cary shines with expected job growth in technology, tourism and academia. Home to one of the largest high-technology R&D; centers in the world, our #5 pick is becoming a preferred location for cutting-edge technology and manufacturing firms. Its relatively low income to cost of living ratio and potential for growth definitely place it in the top tie
r.

 

6. Seattle, WA

Population: 594,210
Average Salary: $49,890
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 79
Average Commute Time: 25.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 34
Unemployment Rate: 8.7
The home to many prominent corporate headquarters including those of Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft and Amazon.com Seattle is Washington state’s largest city and the region’s major economic, cultural and educational center. While the cost of living is a little on the high side, our #6 city has a particularly promising job outlook in alternative energy development and software engineering.
Bonus fun fact: Seattle buys more sunglasses per capita than any city in the US.

 

7. Rochester, NY

Population: 206,759
Average Salary: $40,660
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 3
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 137
Unemployment Rate: 8.5
Rochester is home to several Fortune 1000 companies including the largest wine company in the world, Constellation Brands, and photo experts Eastman Kodak  as well as several national and regional companies. With the second best income to cost of living ratio on our list as well as boasting the lowest commute time, this city is a solid choice.
Bonus fun fact: Rochester is known as the world capital of imaging.

 

8. Portland, OR

Population: 550,396
Average Salary: $43,370
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 58
Average Commute Time: 22.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 55
Unemployment Rate: 10.7
Historically, Portland has had a long-standing association with high-tech industries. According to City-Data.com, more than 1,200 tech companies currently operate in Portland, and, in 2004, microcomputer components manufacturer Intel was the city’s largest employer. The city has also seen consistent growth in the education and health-services sectors, helping the area maintain its high growth ratings despite significant decreases in employment in the natural resources, mining and construction sectors.
 
Bonus fun fact: Portland has the largest independent book store in the world.

 

9. Denver, CO

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $45,610
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 47
Average Commute Time: 22.6 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 113
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
Emphasizing employment in air transportation, telecommunications, aerospace and manufacturing, Denver is a major energy research center and the regional headquarters for government agencies. Its bustling downtown financial district is also considered the “Wall Street of the Rockies,” housing both major national and international banks. And that’s not all Denver is 346 miles west of the exact geographic center of the country, placing it in a great spot for future economic development and growth.
Bonus fun fact: Denver is the only city ever to turn down the Olympics.

 

10. Honolulu, HI

Population: 588,349
Average Salary: $41,250
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 93
Average Commute Time: 22.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 132
Unemployment Rate: 5.4
More than just sun, sand, surf and volcanoes, Hawaii’s capital city boasts the second lowest unemployment rate on our list. The city is heavily focused in government; trade, transportation and utilities; leisure and hospitality; and professional and business services. One-fifth of the land is actually zoned for agriculture and, despite ongoing residential and commercial development, diversified agriculture and aquaculture have seen steady upward trends in recent years.
Bonus fun fact: President Obama was born here.

 

11. Nashville, TN

Population: 590,807
Average Salary: $36,330
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 39
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 153
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
As a leader in finance and insurance, health care, music and entertainment, publishing, transportation technology, higher education, biotechnology, plastics, and tourism and conventions, the economic diversity of America’s country music capital strengthens itself from the inside out. Its income to cost of living ratio is close to the best, especially given the city’s larger size, while the rise in unemployment has remained decently low.
 
Bonus fun fact: Nashville once had the highest number of churches per capita.

 

12. Virginia Beach, VA

Population: 433,746
Average Salary: $37,550
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 37
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 160
Unemployment Rate: 7.2
This beachfront city is best known for its thriving tourism, but is also home to 208 city parks, a national wildlife refuge, long-protected beach areas, three military bases, two universities and numerous historic sites. Major employers include Geico car insurance, Amerigroup health care, Virginia Beach-headquartered Lillian Vernon and Navy Exchange Service Command, while a large agribusiness sector gives our #12 city an extra boost, keeping it just in the top half.
 
Bonus fun fact: The Guinness Book of World Records lists Virginia Beach as having the longest pleasure beach in the world.

 

13. Kansas City, MO

Population: 450,375
Average Salary: $37,970
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 25
Average Commute Time: 20.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 164
Unemployment Rate: 8.4
Kansas City houses the headquarters of four Fortune 500 companies and several more Fortune 1000 corporations, providing a richly diverse economy with significant trade and transportation sectors, government programs and business services. Its cost of living has consistently been at or below the national average, boosting its rating on our list. Not only that, Forbes.com claims “there’s a ‘zone of sanity’ across the middle of the country, including the region around Kansas City, Mo., that largely avoided the real estate bubble and the subsequent foreclosure crisis.”
 
Bonus fun fact: The city is well known for its contributions to jazz music as well as the blues.

 

14. Pittsburgh, PA

Population: 311,218
Average Salary: $38,190
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 9
Average Commute Time: 21.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 169
Unemployment Rate: 7.6
With its former steel-manufacturing base and 446 bridges marking its skyline, Pittsburgh is unofficially considered both “The City of Bridges” and “The Steel City.” Our #14 pick is historically known for its heavy industry, but today its leading industries are healthcare, education, technology, robotics, fashion and financial services. Boasting the third best income to cost of living ratio and third smallest drop in unemployment rate, Pittsburgh comes Excelle-approved and recommended!
Bonus fun fact: Beloved TV personality Mr. Rodgers’ real neighborhood was the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.

 

15. Charlotte, NC

Population: 671,588
Average Salary: $41,200
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 36
Average Commute Time: 25.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 125
Unemployment Rate: 11.7
Home to the nation’s largest financial asset – Bank of America – as well as a number of Fortune 500 companies, this comfortable North Carolina city offers a solid salary to cost of living ratio. However, this has also left it more vulnerable to the economic downturn. It would have scored higher on our list, were it not for the drastic increase in unemployment since last year (up 6%).
Bonus fun fact: Charlotte has two nuclear power plants!

 

16. Boston, MA

Population: 599,351
Average Salary: $51,730
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 80
Average Commute Time: 27.3 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 118
Unemployment Rate: 7.4
 
The unofficial “Capital of New England” is home to 21 four-year colleges and universities, making it a national center for higher education. These schools add to the local economy, not just by creating jobs but by attracting loads of high tech industries to the city. And at an average salary of $51,730, Boston boasts one of the highest incomes on our list. Living costs, however, are on the higher side, which pushes this iconic city farther down the list.
Bonus fun fact: The first telephone call was made in Boston.

 

17. Buffalo, NY

Population: 272,632
Average Salary: $38,640
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 1
Average Commute Time: 19.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 174
Unemployment Rate: 9.6
Known for an abundance of greenery, a historic waterfront and a diverse cuisine, Buffalo has a lot to offer in terms of overall value. New York’s second largest city topped the list for cost-of-living per income ratio, and boasts one of the lowest average commute times in the nation. Unfortunately, this city also has one of highest unemployment rates on the list, so this year it ranks in the bottom half.
Bonus fun fact: Not surprisingly, buffalo wings were invented here!

 

18. Columbus, OH

Population: 747,755
Average Salary: $40,770
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 17
Average Commute Time: 20 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 178
Unemployment Rate: 7.9
 
Named after Christopher Columbus, the largest city in Ohio is also one of the largest cities on our list. The city boasts a robust economy, ranking in the top 10 in the nation. Government jobs provide the largest source of employment here, followed by its large higher education institutions. Columbus offers a relatively low cost of living and also boasts the lowest unemployment rate of all the 25 best value cities on this list.
 
Bonus fun fact: 50% of the United States population lives within a 500-mile radius of Columbus.

 

19. Indianapolis, IN

Population: 795,458
Average Salary: $39,840
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 12
Average Commute Time: 21.7 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 197
Unemployment Rate: 8.2
Formerly a manufacturing-heavy city, Indianapolis has shifted to encompass a much more diversified economy today, its key industries include education, healthcare, tourism and finance. And if you love sports, Indianapolis may just be the place for you. The city hosts several major sporting events, including the Indianapolis 500, Brickyard 400 and men’s and women’s NCAA championships. It is also the fourth largest city on this list – below Philadelphia, San Antonio, and San Diego.
Bonus fun fact: Indianapolis has the largest children’s museum in the world.

 

20. St. Louis, MO

Population: 354,361
Average Salary: $40,630
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 23
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 179
Unemployment Rate: 9.2
Known as the city that marks the divide between the Eastern and Western United States, St. Louis is often called the “Gateway City.” It’s home to some of our nation’s largest public and privately held corporations  Enterprise Rent-A-Car, Scottrade, Energizer and Anheuser-Busch Breweries are just a few of its best known local companies. And it didn’t just make our own short list of great cities this charming city ranks among the whole world’s top 100 cities in terms of quality of life.
Bonus fun fact: The ice cream cone was invented in St. Louis.

 

21. Hartford, CT

Population: 124,563
Average Salary: $48,650
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 74
Average Commute Time: 33.2 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 199
Unemployment Rate: 8
Nicknamed the “Insurance Capital of the World,” Hartford is home to some of the world’s largest insurance company headquarters. It also boasts some of our nation’s oldest institutions the oldest art museum, park, and continuously published newspaper all hail from Hartford. With a high average salary and a relatively low cost of living, it’s no wonder this picturesque city made our cut.
Bonus fun fact: Nitrous oxide (laughing gas) was discovered in Hartford.

 

22. Louisville, KY

Population: 256,231
Average Salary: $37,410
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 16
Average Commute Time: 21.5 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 204
Unemployment Rate: 10
Louisville is a charming southern belle of a city with a derby full of galloping job opportunities.  Ranked at #16 for cost of living, Louisville offers country charm and city amenities.  The job growth is pacing around the national average, and the unemployment rate has gone up a reasonable 4.2% since the recession began.
Bonus fun fact: 90% of the United States’ disco balls are produced in Louisville.

 

23. Cincinnati, OH

Population: 332,458
Average Salary: $40,540
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 14
Average Commute Time: 21 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 207
Unemployment Rate: 8.9
Procter & Gamble, Sunny Delight, and Chiquita Brands International are amongst the impressive list of 10 Fortune 100 companies based in the this all-Amer
ican, river-front city.  Its unemployment rate has not grown as much as other former industrial cities, gaining only 3.6% since before the economy collapsed.  With solid job growth potential, Cincinnati’s big Fortune 100 companies are slowly pulling the city back into a positive economic reality.
Bonus fun fact: Cincinnati was home to the first night baseball game.

 

24. Philadelphia, PA

Population: 1,449,634
Average Salary: $44,460
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 59
Average Commute Time: 29.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 176
Unemployment Rate: 8.0
The “City of Brotherly Love” and the largest city on our list has experienced a modest 3.1% uptick in unemployment, but has still maintained an unemployment rate much lower than that of comparable cities. A mecca for tourists and American history buffs, Philadelphia also promotes itself as a center for biomedical and pharmaceutical companies. In recent years, education and health sectors have emerged as principal drivers of the local economy, helping the city stay in our top 25.
Bonus fun fact: The lemon meringue pie was invented in Philadelphia.

 

25. San Diego, CA

Population: 1,266,731
Average Salary: $45,210
Cost of Living Rank (in a 1-100 list): 91
Average Commute Time: 23.4 minutes
Job Growth Rank (in a list of 372 Highest Growth Cities): 208
Unemployment Rate: 8.8
San Diego is a splashy surfers paradise in Southern California. If wealth were measured by sun and sand, San Diego would be the nation’s richest city. Unfortunately, the recession has burned San Diego with a 3.8% increase in unemployment. Still, the city enjoys a mean income of over $45,000 and a top-25 ranking amongst the nation’s best cities for job growth. So grab your board and your resume because San Diego remains a promising place to work and an even better place to play.

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By Anna Hennings, Tania Khadder, Adam Starr, Alice Handley | Excelle of Monster 

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

2 Secret Reasons 90% of Employers Won’t Hire You – Reasons They Won’t Discuss

While most of us job applicants are organized, on time, dressed appropriately, even prepared to discuss specific workplace topics and job attributes at a job interview large numbers of job seekers fail to address unspoken hiring protocols often posed by many employers. Transgress against these often hidden hiring hurdles and you may find yourself on the way through the door marked “Exit,” headed back to your transportation, no job offer in hand.

What are those unspoken job search issues? First let’s look at some of the more obvious reasons employers remove applicants from the hiring process. For instance, arriving late to a job interview, or arriving overtly early, is a ‘no no;’ neither of those actions will endear you to a job interviewer. Nor will cell phone use in the midst of a job interview. Or use of any type of food or drink product, unless it’s part of the job interview, like when meeting at a restaurant, a café, or a lounge of some sort, or if the interviewer or their staff offer such a product.

That’s the ‘quick list’ version of some common reasons employers remove individuals from their hiring processes. Deeper reasons exist, too, with just as deadly a job search result as those issues mentioned above, yet not as obvious to us. In fact, most readers of this article will silently believe they already have a good understanding of the general hiring process, and do a good job organizing and implementing their job search, and especially their resume and job interview techniques. As a consequence of that thinking, like U.S. Department Of Labor statistics verify, and ninety-percent of job seekers already know, but may not want to face – nine-out-of-ten job interviews do not generate a job offer! Here are two primary reasons why many job applicants find themselves on the wrong side of job offer door:

Poor resume preparation – Delivering a resume that doesn’t address specific workplace tasks and expectations of results that an individual employer prospect seeks is a waste of your time and theirs. For the most part – employers need to see that information on resumes; employers react weakly to weak resumes, and strong to resumes that express a strong understanding of the job the company is trying to fill. Employers especially do not like resumes that carry misspellings, poor punctuation, or sloppy formatting – we all know that, right? But did you thoroughly proof-read your own resume, twice or more? Nor do employers appreciate resumes that ramble on about unrelated aspects of endeavors concerning past positions; keep your resume focused on the hiring needs of the employer seated in front of you. Customize your resume for them. Let them know you customized your resume for them, as a courtesy, to match the job and to be effective when you meet together.

Poor job interview preparation – Employers really don’t appreciate it when you show up for a job interview, but failed to investigate the background, direction, hiring needs, and specific workplace requirement for the job title you seek.

Rehearse aloud your answers to specific, expected job search questions, that relate directly to the workplace skills required, and hiring needs of that particular company and the job title sought. Strive to understand the company and the job you want. And strive to understand it as well as the job interviewer does. Don’t just review your thoughts on these super important job place issues. Your possible employer has thought and written and discussed these hiring issues to the extreme. Do the same – if you really want the job. Organize lists of topics and questions that the job interviewer may ask about in your upcoming job interview; then write each question out in detail, and their respective answers, then say aloud the responses to those questions, say the words aloud to another person, to see if they make good sense of what you say. Let your answers be brief, but to the point. Then, practice, practice, practice.

Ponder the job search issues mentioned within this article, how they lurk in the ways we present ourselves as job applicants for a particular job title or to a particular employer prospect. Understand that a job seeker has to be seen as the best, most prepared, smartest applicant for a particular job title – from first contact to that all important job offer moment.
 

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By Mark Baber

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

2 Secret Reasons 90% of Employers Won't Hire You – Reasons They Won't Discuss

While most of us job applicants are organized, on time, dressed appropriately, even prepared to discuss specific workplace topics and job attributes at a job interview large numbers of job seekers fail to address unspoken hiring protocols often posed by many employers. Transgress against these often hidden hiring hurdles and you may find yourself on the way through the door marked “Exit,” headed back to your transportation, no job offer in hand.

What are those unspoken job search issues? First let’s look at some of the more obvious reasons employers remove applicants from the hiring process. For instance, arriving late to a job interview, or arriving overtly early, is a ‘no no;’ neither of those actions will endear you to a job interviewer. Nor will cell phone use in the midst of a job interview. Or use of any type of food or drink product, unless it’s part of the job interview, like when meeting at a restaurant, a café, or a lounge of some sort, or if the interviewer or their staff offer such a product.

That’s the ‘quick list’ version of some common reasons employers remove individuals from their hiring processes. Deeper reasons exist, too, with just as deadly a job search result as those issues mentioned above, yet not as obvious to us. In fact, most readers of this article will silently believe they already have a good understanding of the general hiring process, and do a good job organizing and implementing their job search, and especially their resume and job interview techniques. As a consequence of that thinking, like U.S. Department Of Labor statistics verify, and ninety-percent of job seekers already know, but may not want to face – nine-out-of-ten job interviews do not generate a job offer! Here are two primary reasons why many job applicants find themselves on the wrong side of job offer door:

Poor resume preparation – Delivering a resume that doesn’t address specific workplace tasks and expectations of results that an individual employer prospect seeks is a waste of your time and theirs. For the most part – employers need to see that information on resumes; employers react weakly to weak resumes, and strong to resumes that express a strong understanding of the job the company is trying to fill. Employers especially do not like resumes that carry misspellings, poor punctuation, or sloppy formatting – we all know that, right? But did you thoroughly proof-read your own resume, twice or more? Nor do employers appreciate resumes that ramble on about unrelated aspects of endeavors concerning past positions; keep your resume focused on the hiring needs of the employer seated in front of you. Customize your resume for them. Let them know you customized your resume for them, as a courtesy, to match the job and to be effective when you meet together.

Poor job interview preparation – Employers really don’t appreciate it when you show up for a job interview, but failed to investigate the background, direction, hiring needs, and specific workplace requirement for the job title you seek.

Rehearse aloud your answers to specific, expected job search questions, that relate directly to the workplace skills required, and hiring needs of that particular company and the job title sought. Strive to understand the company and the job you want. And strive to understand it as well as the job interviewer does. Don’t just review your thoughts on these super important job place issues. Your possible employer has thought and written and discussed these hiring issues to the extreme. Do the same – if you really want the job. Organize lists of topics and questions that the job interviewer may ask about in your upcoming job interview; then write each question out in detail, and their respective answers, then say aloud the responses to those questions, say the words aloud to another person, to see if they make good sense of what you say. Let your answers be brief, but to the point. Then, practice, practice, practice.

Ponder the job search issues mentioned within this article, how they lurk in the ways we present ourselves as job applicants for a particular job title or to a particular employer prospect. Understand that a job seeker has to be seen as the best, most prepared, smartest applicant for a particular job title – from first contact to that all important job offer moment.
 

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By Mark Baber

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

25 Best Jobs for Baby Boomers – with Annual Salary and Projected annual openings

Baby boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964, are nearing retirement age. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that there are 78.2 million boomers, and that every hour, 330 of them turn 60. That means an entire generation of workers might leave the work force in the coming years.
But they might not.
Many baby boomers are choosing to postpone retirement and stay at their current jobs or find new ones. Some can’t afford to retire, but many want to explore new avenues. After decades of working in jobs that paid the bills but didn’t fulfill them, they’re moving to different industries.
For their book “225 Best Jobs for Baby Boomers,” authors Michael Farr and Laurence Shatkin decided to comb through data to discover what the best jobs are for baby boomers. They looked at salaries, projected job growth and the number of openings to calculate which jobs have the most promise.
Farr and Shatkin break down their findings in more than 70 lists, ranging from the best-paying jobs to the best jobs for boomers age 45-54. Whatever your criteria  are, Farr and Shatkin have the job for you.
Below you’ll find the list for the 25 overall best jobs for all baby boomers:
1. Management analysts
What they make*: $67,005
Projected annual openings**: 78,000
2. Teachers,  post-secondary
What they make: $68,456
Projected annual openings: 216,000
3. Logisticians
What they make: $44,563
Projected annual openings: 162,000
4. General and operations managers
What they make: $93,594
Projected annual openings: 260,000
5. Registered nurses
What they make: $66,427
Projected annual openings: 215,000
6. Anesthesiologists
What they make: $310,132
Projected annual openings: 38,000
7. General internists
What they make: $351,307
Projected annual openings: 38,000
8. Obstetricians and gynecologists
What they make: $285,254
Projected annual openings: 38,000
9. Family and general practitioners
What they make: $198,221
Projected annual openings: 38,000
10. Psychiatrists
What they make: $191,080
Project annual openings: 38,000
11. Surgeons
What they make: $322,281
Projected annual openings: 38,000
12. General pediatricians
What they make: $181,764
Projected annual openings: 38,000
13. Medical and health services managers
What they make:
$94,269
Projected annual openings: 33,000
14. Financial managers, branch or department
What they make: $101,963
Projected annual openings: 71,000
15. Treasurers, controllers and chief financial officers
What they make: $172,946 – $240,588
Projected annual openings: 71,000
16. Chief executives
What they make:
$382,705
Projected annual openings: 63,000
17. Government service executives
What they make: $167,766
Projected annual openings: 63,000
18. Private sector executives
What they make: $169,570
Projected annual openings: 63,000
19. Pharmacists
What they make: $108,499
Projected annual openings: 23,000
20. Lawyers
What they make: $116,810
Projected annual openings: 53,000
21. Education administrators, elementary and secondary school
What they make: $150,467
Projected annual openings: 31,000
22. Administrative services managers
What they make: $86,666
Projected annual openings: 40,000
23. Sales representatives, agricultural
What they make:
$53,034
Projected annual openings: 44,000
24. Sales representatives, chemical and pharmaceutical
What they make:
$88,049
Projected annual openings: 44,000
25. Sales representatives, electrical/electronics
What they make: $51,105
Projected annual openings: 44,000
*Salary figures based on data from CBsalary.com, powered by SalaryExpert.com
**Projected annual openings figures based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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By Anthony Balderrama, CareerBuilder writer

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Top 10 Companies Hiring This Week August 22 – 28, Hurry up

We know that your job search can get quite frustrating these days with more people trying to find a job and less employment opportunities available.

To ease the burden, we’ve tracked down 10 top companies with the most job openings this week from sales jobs to finance jobs, full-time jobs to part-time jobs. We hope you find a job that’s perfect for you.

Good luck job hunting!

01. Kraft Foods

We make today delicious in about 150 countries where we sell our products. And, our employees can be seen in action in more than 70 countries. At Kraft Foods, we relish innovative thinking and fresh ideas — we invite you to consider having a seat at the table.

Top Job Categories:

02. Durham School Services

Durham School Services has a strong record of success and decades of experience in pupil transportation. With the support of National Express Group, a global leader in transportation, we are confident we can provide exceptional service to your district.

Top Job Categories:

03. Dunbar Armored

The Dunbar Companies continue to set the highest industry standards for service, integrity and innovation. Security is our heritage and our only business.

Top Job Categories:

04. Scholastic

For over 85 years, teachers and parents have recognized Scholastic as a trusted name in learning. The Company continues this successful history by remaining focused on encouraging children to learn to read and love to learn, helping teachers carry out their important jobs and supporting parents in their role as their child’s first teacher.

Top Job Categories:

05. AAA

For over 100 years, we have been serving you and other AAA members on the road and around the world. Today, we offer our extensive services to you on the internet. Now, more than ever, AAA is able to help you around the clock with all your Cars & Driving, Travel, Insurance, Banking and Loan needs.

Top Job Categories:

06. Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo & Company is a diversified financial services company providing banking, insurance, investments, mortgage and consumer finance through almost 6,000 stores, the internet and other distribution channels across North America and internationally.

Top Job Categories:

07. Sears

Sears Hometown Stores were developed sixteen years ago to serve our customers in locations outside of major metroploitan cities. There are currently about 900 Hometown Stores throughout the United States and Puerto Rico. These stores carry all of the top home appliance brands, consumer electronics, tools and lawn and garden equipment.

Top Job Categories:

08. UPS

Founded in 1907 as a messenger company in the United States, UPS has grown into a $42.6 billion corporation by clearly focusing on the goal of enabling commerce around the globe. Today UPS is a global company with one of the most recognized and admired brands in the world.

Top Job Categories:

9. Comcast Cable

Comcast Corporation is the nation’s leading provider of cable, entertainment and communications products and services, with 24.4 million cable customers, 14.7 million high-speed Internet customers and 6.1 million Comcast Digital Voice customers.

Top Job Categories:

10. Rent-a-Center Stores

Our stores offer name-brand furniture, electronics, appliances and computers through flexible rental purchase agreements that generally allow the customer to obtain ownership of the merchandise at the conclusion of an agreed upon rental period. We offer same-day delivery, 90 days same as cash and an early purchase option. Should merchandise need repair while it is on rent, we repair it at no additional cost to the customer. We also offer our customers a product substitute to use while theirs is in service.

Top Job Categories:

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

How to argue with your boss and win … may be

Do your homework and try not to be confrontational when disagreeing

Apple’s people told Steve Jobs the new iPhone had antenna problems that needed fixing. They didn’t get through, though, and as a result Apple brought a faulty product to market. It’s hard to disagree with the boss, especially a hard-driving, charismatic one like Jobs. But it’s part of a manager’s responsibility to push back against a decision, a plan or a directive that’s faulty. Here’s how you can argue successfully with the boss and live to tell about it. Take these three steps.

1. Get all the facts. Is the boss’s decision really boneheaded? Maybe there are reasons for it that you don’t understand. The company’s strategy could be shifting in response to competitors’ moves, a pending cash crunch, a regulatory problem, M&A activity, or other conditions not yet apparent to you. It’s possible that the boss understands there will be problems but feels that from a big-picture perspective the plan makes sense.

You’ll encourage an open discussion about the decision if you listen respectfully as the boss announces it rather than reflexively arguing against it or, worse, disagreeing in public or losing your temper. Ask for “background” about the plan, not a “rationale” for it, which can sound confrontational. Learn what it’s meant to achieve. Learn in what ways the decision is based on solid evidence, and in what ways on assumptions. Ask open-ended questions about the effect it will have on staff, the supply chain, finances, the company’s reputation and so on.

Tell the boss you agree with his objectives, or you agree that change is needed, or that there are parts of the plan that sound really good to you. Ask for permission to study it and discuss it later. Schedule a meeting.

Gather all the intelligence that’s available so you can develop an alternate plan that achieves the original decision’s objectives but avoids its problems.

2. Develop your plan. Don’t let your disappointment about the decision make you feel you have to start from scratch. Identify what’s good about the boss’s plan. Try to retain those parts, not only because they’re right but also to give the boss some ownership of your version. Get creative. Think about all the other ways the expected goals could be reached. You can begin by picturing an ideal solution and thinking forward to see what would be needed to make it work.

Mine your network for ideas. Ask people across the company how they can add value to your proposition. Suppliers can be especially useful to talk with, since they may have processes that can help. As you talk with others, make it clear that you’re looking for the best way to make the boss’s plan work, not trying to supplant it with your own.

Test your plan with trusted advisors. They may identify flaws you don’t see. Maybe your plan won’t generate revenue quickly enough. Maybe it relies on resources that are no longer available. Your advisors can help you make the process you’re proposing faster, cheaper and even more effective. They also can tell you if it will threaten someone who might try to block it. Working with them, you can find ways to get that person’s support.

Think about the boss’s personal motivators as well. Maybe he’s playing it safe because of a pending retirement, or maybe he’s accepting some risk to earn a huge bonus. You can’t get into someone else’s mind, but you can try to get into the boss’s shoes, to look at the plan from his perspective. (While you’re at it, examine your own motives: Are you against the plan because it hurts you in some way? Because you weren’t consulted? Because the boss is a dork who couldn’t have any good ideas?)

3. Present your plan.
Anticipate what questions the boss may ask about your plan, and prepare concise, persuasive answers to them. Prepare a written summary that you’ll leave behind. Present your plan with confidence and enthusiasm, because if you don’t show you believe in it, the boss won’t either.

Begin by describing the plan’s payoffs, and then go into details of its implementation. Don’t burden the boss with too much detail, though, unless you’re asked for it. Once the boss is satisfied with your answer to a question, stop explaining and move on with your presentation. Avoid digressing from your main message or mentioning other people’s criticisms of the boss’s plan.

Choose your words carefully. When discussing the original plan, never use the word “disagree.” That might get the boss’s back up. Even a “but” might infer you’re negating what the boss says. Present “recommendations” or “suggestions,” not the “conclusion” you reached about what’s needed, which would sound pompous.

Despite your best efforts, the boss may insist that you carry out the original plan. If that happens, the best solution may be to get approval to do so on a test basis. Be sure you make it an honest test, not one intended to showcase the plan’s weaknesses. Document every step. Let staff members who don’t have an interest in the results help you make your evaluation. Cite their participation when you report the results.

What can you do if the boss remains unpersuaded? Come to the meeting prepared for that possibility. If the plan violates law or compromises ethics, you may choose to refuse and accept the consequences. Absent those kinds of problems, though, you can agree to move ahead and feel good about it because you’ve met your obligation to make a strong case against the decision. Be sure the boss understands that you’re ready to move forward with dedication and enthusiasm.

At some point every manager has to argue with the boss. Whether or not you’re successful, the challenge can provide a payoff. You get to demonstrate leadership, creativity, an ability to negotiate and deep concern for the well being of both your boss and the company.
———————-

By Bill Rosenthal

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

How to argue with your boss and win … may be

Do your homework and try not to be confrontational when disagreeing

Apple’s people told Steve Jobs the new iPhone had antenna problems that needed fixing. They didn’t get through, though, and as a result Apple brought a faulty product to market. It’s hard to disagree with the boss, especially a hard-driving, charismatic one like Jobs. But it’s part of a manager’s responsibility to push back against a decision, a plan or a directive that’s faulty. Here’s how you can argue successfully with the boss and live to tell about it. Take these three steps.

1. Get all the facts. Is the boss’s decision really boneheaded? Maybe there are reasons for it that you don’t understand. The company’s strategy could be shifting in response to competitors’ moves, a pending cash crunch, a regulatory problem, M&A; activity, or other conditions not yet apparent to you. It’s possible that the boss understands there will be problems but feels that from a big-picture perspective the plan makes sense.

You’ll encourage an open discussion about the decision if you listen respectfully as the boss announces it rather than reflexively arguing against it or, worse, disagreeing in public or losing your temper. Ask for “background” about the plan, not a “rationale” for it, which can sound confrontational. Learn what it’s meant to achieve. Learn in what ways the decision is based on solid evidence, and in what ways on assumptions. Ask open-ended questions about the effect it will have on staff, the supply chain, finances, the company’s reputation and so on.

Tell the boss you agree with his objectives, or you agree that change is needed, or that there are parts of the plan that sound really good to you. Ask for permission to study it and discuss it later. Schedule a meeting.

Gather all the intelligence that’s available so you can develop an alternate plan that achieves the original decision’s objectives but avoids its problems.

2. Develop your plan. Don’t let your disappointment about the decision make you feel you have to start from scratch. Identify what’s good about the boss’s plan. Try to retain those parts, not only because they’re right but also to give the boss some ownership of your version. Get creative. Think about all the other ways the expected goals could be reached. You can begin by picturing an ideal solution and thinking forward to see what would be needed to make it work.

Mine your network for ideas. Ask people across the company how they can add value to your proposition. Suppliers can be especially useful to talk with, since they may have processes that can help. As you talk with others, make it clear that you’re looking for the best way to make the boss’s plan work, not trying to supplant it with your own.

Test your plan with trusted advisors. They may identify flaws you don’t see. Maybe your plan won’t generate revenue quickly enough. Maybe it relies on resources that are no longer available. Your advisors can help you make the process you’re proposing faster, cheaper and even more effective. They also can tell you if it will threaten someone who might try to block it. Working with them, you can find ways to get that person’s support.

Think about the boss’s personal motivators as well. Maybe he’s playing it safe because of a pending retirement, or maybe he’s accepting some risk to earn a huge bonus. You can’t get into someone else’s mind, but you can try to get into the boss’s shoes, to look at the plan from his perspective. (While you’re at it, examine your own motives: Are you against the plan because it hurts you in some way? Because you weren’t consulted? Because the boss is a dork who couldn’t have any good ideas?)

3. Present your plan.
Anticipate what questions the boss may ask about your plan, and prepare concise, persuasive answers to them. Prepare a written summary that you’ll leave behind. Present your plan with confidence and enthusiasm, because if you don’t show you believe in it, the boss won’t either.

Begin by describing the plan’s payoffs, and then go into details of its implementation. Don’t burden the boss with too much detail, though, unless you’re asked for it. Once the boss is satisfied with your answer to a question, stop explaining and move on with your presentation. Avoid digressing from your main message or mentioning other people’s criticisms of the boss’s plan.

Choose your words carefully. When discussing the original plan, never use the word “disagree.” That might get the boss’s back up. Even a “but” might infer you’re negating what the boss says. Present “recommendations” or “suggestions,” not the “conclusion” you reached about what’s needed, which would sound pompous.

Despite your best efforts, the boss may insist that you carry out the original plan. If that happens, the best solution may be to get approval to do so on a test basis. Be sure you make it an honest test, not one intended to showcase the plan’s weaknesses. Document every step. Let staff members who don’t have an interest in the results help you make your evaluation. Cite their participation when you report the results.

What can you do if the boss remains unpersuaded? Come to the meeting prepared for that possibility. If the plan violates law or compromises ethics, you may choose to refuse and accept the consequences. Absent those kinds of problems, though, you can agree to move ahead and feel good about it because you’ve met your obligation to make a strong case against the decision. Be sure the boss understands that you’re ready to move forward with dedication and enthusiasm.

At some point every manager has to argue with the boss. Whether or not you’re successful, the challenge can provide a payoff. You get to demonstrate leadership, creativity, an ability to negotiate and deep concern for the well being of both your boss and the company.
———————-

By Bill Rosenthal

————————————————————–
If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

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