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Archive for December, 2010

The 50 Best Careers of 2011

 Consider these high-opportunity jobs as you look for your next paycheck:

It pays to be smart when choosing your career, particularly now that the job market is (slowly) improving. With the recession officially over, anyone who’s out of work or eager to change jobs is on the lookout for opportunities. But where, exactly, are the jobs? Which occupations offer decent salaries, quality of life and are likely to stick around for the next decade?
Click here to find out more!
Our list of 50 Best Careers answers those questions. We’ve highlighted dozens of high-opportunity professions careers you may want to consider as you decide where to look for your next paycheck. Based on job-growth projections, salary data, and other factors like job satisfaction, these occupations span a variety of industries, so you can find the right position for you no matter what your interests.
Here’s our list of the 50 Best Careers of 2011 — click each job to learn more:
Business Jobs:
Creative and Service Jobs:
Healthcare Jobs:
Social Service Jobs:
Clergy
Technology Jobs:
What’s new on the list this year? Several of our picks reflect the recent uptick in the economy, while others are long-time contenders that finally muscled their way onto the roster. With an aging baby boomer generation, healthcare continues to make a strong showing. All of the healthcare jobs on last year’s list have made the cut again this year, plus two new positions: massage therapist and athletic trainer. While the field of athletic training doesn’t offer the sheer number of positions as nursing or dental hygiene, it outranks nearly all other healthcare occupations for expected job growth.
Technology positions also account for a good chunk of our top-choice careers. Computer support specialist joins the ranks this year with upward trending employment numbers. Education administrator, which ranked particularly high for job satisfaction, made it onto our lineup of social service jobs. In the business category, we added sales manager, an occupation that’s making a comeback along with the economy.
On our creative and service jobs list, heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration technician is new this year, largely because of its high expected job growth. Interpreter/translator, an occupation that’s increasingly in demand as a result of globalization, also made the cut.
To come up with this year’s list, U.S. News considered job-growth projections from the Labor Department, estimates for 2008 to 2018, the most recent data available. We narrowed it down to occupations that are expected to add jobs at an above-average rate over the next decade, as well as those that provide an above-average median income. Sales manager makes the highest median annual salary on our list, nearly $97,000. Computer software engineer, physician assistant, meteorologist and education administrator all bring in median average salaries in the mid-$80,000 range.
We also considered, where possible, data on job satisfaction, turnover, and impending retirements, which crank up openings in jobs that may have only slightly above-average employment growth. We talked with labor and industry experts as well, gathering anecdotal evidence about employment prospects and job satisfaction. We excluded careers that lack a statistically significant number of positions and therefore provide opportunity for only a small number of workers. When necessary, we favored jobs that would help diversify our list in terms of category and educational requirements, since not everyone wants to work in healthcare or go to school for six years.
Most of the jobs that were cut from the list this year showed a higher-than-average unemployment rate or shrinking employment numbers during the last few quarters. From the creative and service jobs category, funeral director, plumber, security system installer, and landscape architect got the boot. In business, we cut market research analyst, loan officer, and cost estimator.
Of course, no one job is best for everyone, and everyone has their own ideas about what makes a job great. “You have to like what you’re doing or you’re not going to be successful at it,” says Emily Bennington, who helps college graduates transition into careers through her company, Professional Studio 365. At the same time, “if you’re not getting paid to do it, you’re not going to love it for very long.”
Qualities that make a job desirable also change with the times and circumstances. Tom Smith, director of the General Social Survey, conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, expects his next set of job-satisfaction data to show that workers value stability more than they did before the recession. “Occupations that have greater job stability perhaps have improved in the public’s evaluation,” he says.
Even as hiring picks up, the odds can seem daunting to job seekers. In a struggling economy with a 9.6 percent unemployment rate, competition is stiff even for some jobs that made our list. For every job opening in September, there were about five unemployed people, according to the Labor Department. While that’s an improvement from 6.2 people for every job opening in November 2009, the most recent peak, “it’s still a very tough job market,” says Steve Hipple, an economist at the Labor Department. During the three years before the recession, the rate averaged 1.7 unemployed people for every job opening.
Others like John Challenger, CEO of outplacement company Challenger, Gray & Christmas, are more optimistic. “The whole environment has changed,” says Challenger, who talks daily with companies that are hiring, as well as job seekers. “(It’s) certainly not gang-busters by any means … but it feels like springtime compared to last year’s winter in the job market.”
Whether you’re out of work or your job has simply fallen out of favor, you’ll likely find an occupation on our list that suits you. For each profession, we’ve offered a summary of what you can expect on the job, as well as advice from hiring managers and people who work in that industry about how to land one.
—————–
 

The 50 Best Careers of 2011

 Consider these high-opportunity jobs as you look for your next paycheck:

It pays to be smart when choosing your career, particularly now that the job market is (slowly) improving. With the recession officially over, anyone who’s out of work or eager to change jobs is on the lookout for opportunities. But where, exactly, are the jobs? Which occupations offer decent salaries, quality of life and are likely to stick around for the next decade?
Click here to find out more!
Our list of 50 Best Careers answers those questions. We’ve highlighted dozens of high-opportunity professions careers you may want to consider as you decide where to look for your next paycheck. Based on job-growth projections, salary data, and other factors like job satisfaction, these occupations span a variety of industries, so you can find the right position for you no matter what your interests.
Here’s our list of the 50 Best Careers of 2011 — click each job to learn more:
Business Jobs:
Creative and Service Jobs:
Healthcare Jobs:
Social Service Jobs:
Clergy
Technology Jobs:
What’s new on the list this year? Several of our picks reflect the recent uptick in the economy, while others are long-time contenders that finally muscled their way onto the roster. With an aging baby boomer generation, healthcare continues to make a strong showing. All of the healthcare jobs on last year’s list have made the cut again this year, plus two new positions: massage therapist and athletic trainer. While the field of athletic training doesn’t offer the sheer number of positions as nursing or dental hygiene, it outranks nearly all other healthcare occupations for expected job growth.
Technology positions also account for a good chunk of our top-choice careers. Computer support specialist joins the ranks this year with upward trending employment numbers. Education administrator, which ranked particularly high for job satisfaction, made it onto our lineup of social service jobs. In the business category, we added sales manager, an occupation that’s making a comeback along with the economy.
On our creative and service jobs list, heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration technician is new this year, largely because of its high expected job growth. Interpreter/translator, an occupation that’s increasingly in demand as a result of globalization, also made the cut.
To come up with this year’s list, U.S. News considered job-growth projections from the Labor Department, estimates for 2008 to 2018, the most recent data available. We narrowed it down to occupations that are expected to add jobs at an above-average rate over the next decade, as well as those that provide an above-average median income. Sales manager makes the highest median annual salary on our list, nearly $97,000. Computer software engineer, physician assistant, meteorologist and education administrator all bring in median average salaries in the mid-$80,000 range.
We also considered, where possible, data on job satisfaction, turnover, and impending retirements, which crank up openings in jobs that may have only slightly above-average employment growth. We talked with labor and industry experts as well, gathering anecdotal evidence about employment prospects and job satisfaction. We excluded careers that lack a statistically significant number of positions and therefore provide opportunity for only a small number of workers. When necessary, we favored jobs that would help diversify our list in terms of category and educational requirements, since not everyone wants to work in healthcare or go to school for six years.
Most of the jobs that were cut from the list this year showed a higher-than-average unemployment rate or shrinking employment numbers during the last few quarters. From the creative and service jobs category, funeral director, plumber, security system installer, and landscape architect got the boot. In business, we cut market research analyst, loan officer, and cost estimator.
Of course, no one job is best for everyone, and everyone has their own ideas about what makes a job great. “You have to like what you’re doing or you’re not going to be successful at it,” says Emily Bennington, who helps college graduates transition into careers through her company, Professional Studio 365. At the same time, “if you’re not getting paid to do it, you’re not going to love it for very long.”
Qualities that make a job desirable also change with the times and circumstances. Tom Smith, director of the General Social Survey, conducted by the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago, expects his next set of job-satisfaction data to show that workers value stability more than they did before the recession. “Occupations that have greater job stability perhaps have improved in the public’s evaluation,” he says.
Even as hiring picks up, the odds can seem daunting to job seekers. In a struggling economy with a 9.6 percent unemployment rate, competition is stiff even for some jobs that made our list. For every job opening in September, there were about five unemployed people, according to the Labor Department. While that’s an improvement from 6.2 people for every job opening in November 2009, the most recent peak, “it’s still a very tough job market,” says Steve Hipple, an economist at the Labor Department. During the three years before the recession, the rate averaged 1.7 unemployed people for every job opening.
Others like John Challenger, CEO of outplacement company Challenger, Gray & Christmas, are more optimistic. “The whole environment has changed,” says Challenger, who talks daily with companies that are hiring, as well as job seekers. “(It’s) certainly not gang-busters by any means … but it feels like springtime compared to last year’s winter in the job market.”
Whether you’re out of work or your job has simply fallen out of favor, you’ll likely find an occupation on our list that suits you. For each profession, we’ve offered a summary of what you can expect on the job, as well as advice from hiring managers and people who work in that industry about how to land one.
—————–
 

America’s 20 fastest growing salaries

When you interview for a job, conventional wisdom says you shouldn’t bring up salary. Let the employer broach the topic first. After all, the last thing you want is to give the impression that you’re only taking the job for the money.

If you think about it, the whole formality of salary discussion is strange. Understandably, an employer wants someone who is passionate about the job. But we all know that money is important, otherwise you’d be volunteering full time.

While salary is probably not the only motivation you have for choosing a job, it is an important one. Websites like CBSalary.com and the Bureau of Labor Statistics contain salary information for thousands of jobs so that you can find out what your position typically pays and how it compares with other parts of the country. For example, the average hourly pay increased 1.7 percent over the last year. Did you fare as well?

Here, at the comfort of your computer monitor, you don’t have to pretend that money means nothing to you. If you’re frustrated with the compensation trends for your job, you can vent and no one will know. Or you can see what other industries pay, just out of curiosity.

To appease your curiosity or give you some direction for your next job hunt, we put together a list of some of America’s fastest growing salaries. Their year-over-year pay increases outpaced the national average by several percentage points.

Here are 20 of the jobs with the fastest growing salaries*:

Endodontist
2009 salary: $141,373
2010 salary: $166,874
Increase: 18.03 percent

Oral pathologist
2009 salary: $159,759
2010 salary: $188,577
Increase: 18.03 percent

Periodontist
2009 salary: $150,023
2010 salary: $177,084
Increase: 18.03 percent

Pharmacologist
2009 salary: $90,012
2010 salary: $99,370
Increase: 10.39 percent

Toxicologist
2009 salary: $63,655
2010 salary: $70,273
Increase: 10.39 percent

Academic dean
2009 salary: $93,126
2010 salary: $100,771
Increase: 8.2 percent

Dean of student affairs
2009 salary: $86,201
2010 salary: $93,278
Increase: 8.2 percent

Director of nursing school
2009 salary: $72,315
2010 salary: $78,252
Increase: 8.2 percent

Experimental psychologist
2009 salary: $86,010
2010 salary: $93,057
Increase: 8.19 percent

Social psychologist
2009 salary: $79,272
2010 salary: $85,766
Increase: 8.19 percent

Numerical control programmer
2009 salary: $57,945
2010 salary: $62,620
Increase: 8.06 percent

General surgeon
2009 salary: $317,494
2010 salary: $342,971
Increase: 8.02 percent

Medical officer
2009 salary: $476,753
2010 salary: $515,010
Increase: 8.02 percent

Neurosurgeon
2009 salary: $465,937
2010 salary: $503,326
Increase: 8.02 percent

Orthopedic surgeon
2009 salary: $346,076
2010 salary: $373,847
Increase: 8.02 percent

Plastic surgeon
2009 salary: $264,349
2010 salary: $285,561
Increase: 8.02 percent

Orthopedic podiatrist
2009 salary: $179,889
2010 salary: $193,920
Increase: 7.79 percent

Early childhood development teacher
2009 salary: $34,418
2010 salary: $37,072
Increase: 7.71 percent

Insurance salesperson
2009 salary: $49,121
2010 salary: $52,743
Increase: 7.37 percent

Credit reference clerk
2009 salary: $28,549
2010 salary: $30,393
Increase: 6.45 percent

*Based on data from the ERI Economic Research Institute, Inc.

————————————————
By Anthony Balderrama, CareerBuilder Writer

America's 20 fastest growing salaries

When you interview for a job, conventional wisdom says you shouldn’t bring up salary. Let the employer broach the topic first. After all, the last thing you want is to give the impression that you’re only taking the job for the money.

If you think about it, the whole formality of salary discussion is strange. Understandably, an employer wants someone who is passionate about the job. But we all know that money is important, otherwise you’d be volunteering full time.

While salary is probably not the only motivation you have for choosing a job, it is an important one. Websites like CBSalary.com and the Bureau of Labor Statistics contain salary information for thousands of jobs so that you can find out what your position typically pays and how it compares with other parts of the country. For example, the average hourly pay increased 1.7 percent over the last year. Did you fare as well?

Here, at the comfort of your computer monitor, you don’t have to pretend that money means nothing to you. If you’re frustrated with the compensation trends for your job, you can vent and no one will know. Or you can see what other industries pay, just out of curiosity.

To appease your curiosity or give you some direction for your next job hunt, we put together a list of some of America’s fastest growing salaries. Their year-over-year pay increases outpaced the national average by several percentage points.

Here are 20 of the jobs with the fastest growing salaries*:

Endodontist
2009 salary: $141,373
2010 salary: $166,874
Increase: 18.03 percent

Oral pathologist
2009 salary: $159,759
2010 salary: $188,577
Increase: 18.03 percent

Periodontist
2009 salary: $150,023
2010 salary: $177,084
Increase: 18.03 percent

Pharmacologist
2009 salary: $90,012
2010 salary: $99,370
Increase: 10.39 percent

Toxicologist
2009 salary: $63,655
2010 salary: $70,273
Increase: 10.39 percent

Academic dean
2009 salary: $93,126
2010 salary: $100,771
Increase: 8.2 percent

Dean of student affairs
2009 salary: $86,201
2010 salary: $93,278
Increase: 8.2 percent

Director of nursing school
2009 salary: $72,315
2010 salary: $78,252
Increase: 8.2 percent

Experimental psychologist
2009 salary: $86,010
2010 salary: $93,057
Increase: 8.19 percent

Social psychologist
2009 salary: $79,272
2010 salary: $85,766
Increase: 8.19 percent

Numerical control programmer
2009 salary: $57,945
2010 salary: $62,620
Increase: 8.06 percent

General surgeon
2009 salary: $317,494
2010 salary: $342,971
Increase: 8.02 percent

Medical officer
2009 salary: $476,753
2010 salary: $515,010
Increase: 8.02 percent

Neurosurgeon
2009 salary: $465,937
2010 salary: $503,326
Increase: 8.02 percent

Orthopedic surgeon
2009 salary: $346,076
2010 salary: $373,847
Increase: 8.02 percent

Plastic surgeon
2009 salary: $264,349
2010 salary: $285,561
Increase: 8.02 percent

Orthopedic podiatrist
2009 salary: $179,889
2010 salary: $193,920
Increase: 7.79 percent

Early childhood development teacher
2009 salary: $34,418
2010 salary: $37,072
Increase: 7.71 percent

Insurance salesperson
2009 salary: $49,121
2010 salary: $52,743
Increase: 7.37 percent

Credit reference clerk
2009 salary: $28,549
2010 salary: $30,393
Increase: 6.45 percent

*Based on data from the ERI Economic Research Institute, Inc.

————————————————
By Anthony Balderrama, CareerBuilder Writer

Ten Jobs That Pay $80,000 Per Year …

What do Lauren Bush’s engagement ring, and the Icon CJ3B Army Jeep have in common? They’re two of the things you can buy with $80,000. And while most working stiffs can only dream of plunking down that kind of cash, the median family income in the U.S. brings in only around $50,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) there are some career tracks that can bring those luxury visions a little closer to reality.

Here are ten jobs that earn at least $80,000, according to online salary database PayScale.com, all in industries that are expected to grow through 2018.


01. Commercial Jet Pilot
Median Income: $89,600

The sky’s literally the limit if you’ve always dreamed of flying for a living. According the International Airline Pilots Association, there are many paths to the cockpit but you must have a combination of pilot certificates and ratings, as well as flight experience, and a great attitude. Veterans of the armed services are particularly in demand due to the military’s excellent training and the well-rounded education such a background provides. Bonus: the military route won’t cost a thing.
Commercial Jet Pilot Jobs

 
 

02. Clinical Trial Manager
Median Income: $88,800

From doctors and nurses, to teachers and statisticians, clinical research professionals can come from a wide variety of careers. Training often happens on the job – including everything from testing drugs, to medical equipment, or other biological products. While breaking into the lucrative field of clinical research does require a Bachelor’s degree, pursuing a clinical research curriculum can be done online or through a community college with flexible hours, according to the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCra).
Clinical Trial Manager Jobs

 
03. Chief Lobbyist
Median Income: $88,700

Public relations professionals take note: if you’re passionate about a cause or special interest your skills are perfectly suited to a lobbying firm. Lobbyists can be found on the staffs of corporations, industry trade-organizations, unions, or public interest groups. Lobbyists are employed to help influence legislators in favor of the industries they represent.
Chief Lobbyist Jobs

 
04. Security Architect, IT
Median Income: $88,100

Keeping hackers at bay is just one of the daily challenges IT security architects face on the job. Those who set up, test, and enforce corporate security policies don’t have time to get bored. Security needs are ever-changing and an architect needs to be adaptable and keep up with the latest technology. Earning certification via a professional organization such as the SANS (SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security) Institute will help boost both job and salary prospects.

 
 

05. Pharmaceutical Sales Representative
Median Income: $87,900

There are literally thousands of medications available to help diagnose, prevent, and treat disease. It takes a legion of talented sales people to put those drugs into the hands of health care professionals. However, this high-growth field is competitive, and membership in a professional organization such as the National Association of Pharmaceutical Representatives (NAPRx) will help entry-level reps network and learn how to get a leg up in the field.
Pharmaceutical Sales Representative Jobs

 
06. Oil Well Driller
Median Income: $85,100

The global demand for oil and gas continues unabated. It is possible to enter the field with only a high school diploma as a roughneck or roustabout, and train on-the-job, or for college students to secure an internship or part-time employment as an assistant drillers. Either way, the opportunity for promotions is great for self-motivated, diligent workers.
Oil Well Driller Jobs

 
07. Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager
Median Income: $84,000

You won’t have to master the martial arts, but you will have to pass a number of exams on your way to obtaining a Six Sigma Black Belt. This business management strategy is used in a variety of industries from education and government, to healthcare and manufacturing, as a standard of quality to improve processes. The American Society for Quality (ASQ) offers an internationally-recognized certification track that can help you stand out from the competition, not to mention improve your project management skills.
Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager Jobs

 
08. Certified Nurse Midwife
Median Income: $82,700

With increasing demand for natural and home-based childbirth, certified nurse midwives provide a holistic approach to delivering babies, working both with obstetricians as well as on their own. But their work doesn’t stop with childbirth. Midwives can provide continuing care and counseling to women of all ages, according to the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM). Most are registered nurses who have graduated from a nurse-midwifery education program, and are certified by the ACNM.
Certified Nurse Midwife Jobs

 
09. Auditing Manager
Median Income: $81,400

There are many types of auditing managers but for most thier responsabilites include evaluating and manageing their organizations’s risk, as well as the ethics and values within their organization, according to the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA). Financial auditors analyze and communicate financial information and can be found working for various entities such as companies or individual clients, as well as federal, state, and local governments.
Auditing Manager Jobs

 
10. Supply Chain Manager
Median Income: $80,000

Helping businesses save money by streamlining processes for manufacturing and delivering goods has become increasingly important during the recession. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, candidates who earn certification in production and inventory management, offered by such organizations as the Association for Operations Management (APICS), will stack the hiring odds in their favor by mastering resource and strategic planning, scheduling, and production operations.
Supply Chain Manager Jobs
 

———————————-

Ten Jobs That Pay $80,000 Per Year …

What do Lauren Bush’s engagement ring, and the Icon CJ3B Army Jeep have in common? They’re two of the things you can buy with $80,000. And while most working stiffs can only dream of plunking down that kind of cash, the median family income in the U.S. brings in only around $50,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) there are some career tracks that can bring those luxury visions a little closer to reality.

Here are ten jobs that earn at least $80,000, according to online salary database PayScale.com, all in industries that are expected to grow through 2018.


01. Commercial Jet Pilot
Median Income: $89,600

The sky’s literally the limit if you’ve always dreamed of flying for a living. According the International Airline Pilots Association, there are many paths to the cockpit but you must have a combination of pilot certificates and ratings, as well as flight experience, and a great attitude. Veterans of the armed services are particularly in demand due to the military’s excellent training and the well-rounded education such a background provides. Bonus: the military route won’t cost a thing.
Commercial Jet Pilot Jobs

 
 

02. Clinical Trial Manager
Median Income: $88,800

From doctors and nurses, to teachers and statisticians, clinical research professionals can come from a wide variety of careers. Training often happens on the job – including everything from testing drugs, to medical equipment, or other biological products. While breaking into the lucrative field of clinical research does require a Bachelor’s degree, pursuing a clinical research curriculum can be done online or through a community college with flexible hours, according to the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCra).
Clinical Trial Manager Jobs

 
03. Chief Lobbyist
Median Income: $88,700

Public relations professionals take note: if you’re passionate about a cause or special interest your skills are perfectly suited to a lobbying firm. Lobbyists can be found on the staffs of corporations, industry trade-organizations, unions, or public interest groups. Lobbyists are employed to help influence legislators in favor of the industries they represent.
Chief Lobbyist Jobs

 
04. Security Architect, IT
Median Income: $88,100

Keeping hackers at bay is just one of the daily challenges IT security architects face on the job. Those who set up, test, and enforce corporate security policies don’t have time to get bored. Security needs are ever-changing and an architect needs to be adaptable and keep up with the latest technology. Earning certification via a professional organization such as the SANS (SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security) Institute will help boost both job and salary prospects.

 
 

05. Pharmaceutical Sales Representative
Median Income: $87,900

There are literally thousands of medications available to help diagnose, prevent, and treat disease. It takes a legion of talented sales people to put those drugs into the hands of health care professionals. However, this high-growth field is competitive, and membership in a professional organization such as the National Association of Pharmaceutical Representatives (NAPRx) will help entry-level reps network and learn how to get a leg up in the field.
Pharmaceutical Sales Representative Jobs

 
06. Oil Well Driller
Median Income: $85,100

The global demand for oil and gas
continues unabated. It is possible to enter the field with only a high school diploma as a roughneck or roustabout, and train on-the-job, or for college students to secure an internship or part-time employment as an assistant drillers. Either way, the opportunity for promotions is great for self-motivated, diligent workers.
Oil Well Driller Jobs

 
07. Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager
Median Income: $84,000

You won’t have to master the martial arts, but you will have to pass a number of exams on your way to obtaining a Six Sigma Black Belt. This business management strategy is used in a variety of industries from education and government, to healthcare and manufacturing, as a standard of quality to improve processes. The American Society for Quality (ASQ) offers an internationally-recognized certification track that can help you stand out from the competition, not to mention improve your project management skills.
Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager Jobs

 
08. Certified Nurse Midwife
Median Income: $82,700

With increasing demand for natural and home-based childbirth, certified nurse midwives provide a holistic approach to delivering babies, working both with obstetricians as well as on their own. But their work doesn’t stop with childbirth. Midwives can provide continuing care and counseling to women of all ages, according to the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM). Most are registered nurses who have graduated from a nurse-midwifery education program, and are certified by the ACNM.
Certified Nurse Midwife Jobs

 
09. Auditing Manager
Median Income: $81,400

There are many types of auditing managers but for most thier responsabilites include evaluating and manageing their organizations’s risk, as well as the ethics and values within their organization, according to the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA). Financial auditors analyze and communicate financial information and can be found working for various entities such as companies or individual clients, as well as federal, state, and local governments.
Auditing Manager Jobs

 
10. Supply Chain Manager
Median Income: $80,000

Helping businesses save money by streamlining processes for manufacturing and delivering goods has become increasingly important during the recession. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, candidates who earn certification in production and inventory management, offered by such organizations as the Association for Operations Management (APICS), will stack the hiring odds in their favor by mastering resource and strategic planning, scheduling, and production operations.
Supply Chain Manager Jobs
 

———————————-

6 Ways to Score a Job Through Twitter

Twitter has become a great resource for just about anything, including jobs. From industry chats to Twitter accounts dedicated to posting vacancies, there are a ton of resources for landing a gig.
We’ve already chronicled how to get a job through Facebook (Facebook) and YouTube (YouTube), and now we’re taking a look at the job hunting process on Twitter.
We spoke with nine Tweeters who have landed jobs through Twitter (Twitter) to get their top tips for success on the platform. Below you’ll find a guide to their job hunt strategies on the microblogging service.
If you’ve also been successful in finding a position via Twitter, let us know about your experience in the comments below.

1. Tweet Like an Industry Expert


Words to tweet by: You are what you tweet. Keep in mind that everything you tweet lends to or takes away from your online persona. Whether or not you’re searching for a job, make sure your Twitter stream represents you as a professional individual that has important and unique thoughts to contribute. Your goal should be to become an industry expert or at least tweet like one.
Share links that are relevant to your followers, adding commentary to the latest industry news. This shows that you’re keeping up with industry trends and gives potential employers a look into what you read and care about, which will help them to envision how you may fit into their company’s work environment.
If your commentary on Twitter is interesting enough, you may have employers knocking on your door. Christa Keizer, a recent intern at Cone, a strategy and communications firm, used Twitter during her job search to “[post] relevant, industry-related tweets on a daily basis to establish credibility.” After commenting on one of Cone’s blogs, Marcus Andrews, the New Media Associate at Cone, tweeted to Keizer, thanking her for her comment and asking her about her summer work plans. A few tweets and an interview later, Keizer was hired.
Kate Ottavio, an account executive at PR agency Quinn & Co., had a similar experience. Prior to working at Quinn, she worked at a small PR agency in Connecticut. One day, Allyns Melendez, HR Director at Quinn, started following Ottavio on Twitter she waited for Ottavio to follow back, and then asked her if she’d like to move to New York, where Quinn is headquartered. Little did she know, Melendez was looking for a new hire for the real estate division of the firm. Melendez had first searched for “PR” and “real estate” on LinkedIn (LinkedIn), where Ottavio’s profile popped up.
Although Ottavio wasn’t looking for a job at the time, her Twitter strategy had always been to “represent myself as a knowledgeable and reputable PR professional. I tweet about 10-20 times a day about anything from personal experiences to Mashable (Mashable) articles to PR blog posts.” Loving the opportunity that Quinn presented her, she promptly accepted.

2. Use Twitter Hashtags


There are lots of ways to use Twitter hashtags to get a job. Here are a few types of hashtags to get you started:
  • Job Listings: You can find general job advice and lots of listings through hashtags like #jobs, #recruiting, #jobadvice, #jobposting, #jobhunt and #jobsearch. To narrow it down, though, seek out more specific hashtags, such as or #prjobs or #salesjobs.
  • Industry Conferences: Most conferences these days have their own hashtags when a relevant industry conference is approaching, get active with attendees using the hashtag. Whether you’re attending the conference or not, you can contribute to the conversation. Many conferences also have live streams, so it’s as if you’re attending anyway! Live tweet panels and speeches that you’re interested in and connect with other tweeters along the way. By using Twitter for networking within your industry, you’ll increase your chances of getting hired down the road.
  • Job-Related and Industry Chats: Getting involved with industry chats is a way to show your industry in a particular field and represent yourself as a knowledgeable person. Check out this Twitter chat schedule to get a head start. Also, if your search isn’t going so well, get involved in job-related chats, such as #jobhuntchat, #careerchat, #internchat and #hirefriday for friendly advice.
  • Liz (Pope) Schmidt, now the media and research manager at Sevans Strategy, attested to the power of industry Twitter chats: “I began participating in #Journchat, created and hosted by Sarah Evans [owner of Sevans Strategy, a public relations and new media consultancy]. Although I had known Sarah from a past virtual work experience, I was able to reconnect with her through Twitter. I mentioned her in several tweets and participated in her online discussions. Soon after, based on a direct message conversation with Sarah on Twitter, I came on board at Sevans Strategy.”Besides scouring job search hashtags, job seekers can also follow Twitter accounts dedicated to posting job openings, use Twitter search to find postings or keep an eye out on the Twitter streams of companies they might want to work for.


    3. Connect with Recruiters and Current Employees


    Don’t be afraid to research the companies that you want to work for to find out who currently works there and who is involved with recruiting. After all, while you’re searching for a job, recruiters are scouring the web at the same time looking for pertinent information about job candidates. Interacting with current employees and active recruiters is an easy way to learn more about a company and its job opportunities.Take Connie Zheng’s word she’s already been hired for two jobs through Twitter. “I got my PR internship at Text 100 using Twitter, as well as my entry-level position at Burson-Marsteller using Twitter,” she explained. She advises job seekers, “Use Twitter as a research tool to identify who the appropriate HR person or recruiter is at the desired company.”Shankar Ganesh, a student at the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology and Research Academy in India, recently landed a marketing consulting internship at business apps provider Zoho Corporation by connecting with a technologist employed by the company. “I wanted to spend my summer as an intern at Zoho (zoho), so I approached employees using Twitter,” he recounted. “I showed them what I had done previously and my website for credibility. My interest was forwarded to Zoho’s HR team, and we got in touch.” Soon after, he was offered the internship.Even if a company isn’t hiring, it’s a good idea to stay in contact with recruiters and employees. When a position opens up, it’s likely that you’ll be one of the first to be contacted, said Alison Morris, an account coordinator at The CHT Group, a strategic communications firm based in Boston. Morris told us how she landed her current position on Twitter:

    “In April 2010, Ben Hendricks, Senior VP at The CHT Group, and I began corresponding about corporate communications and social media’s role in the corporate environment. Much to my dismay, CHT was not yet hiring. In June, after a few months distance, Ben sent me an email to let me know the agency was hiring and that he wanted me to apply. Still looking for a job, I sent over my resume, and about a week later, I was employed.”

    Keep an eye out for socially savvy companies like CHT it also recently hired Marissa Green as an account coordinator through Twitter and is now looking for a spring intern, with Twitter being one of its main recruiting outlets.


    4. Build a Relevant Network


    A lot of successful Twitter job stories actually end with the punchline, “I wasn’t even looking for a job.” In many cases, these lucky new hires just found interesting opportunities serendipitously, which makes sense given that it’s Twitter we’re talking about.Twitter is all about networking, so build a network that makes sense for you. You’ll find that a lot of the opportunities that are presented to you are simply organic. Here’s an anecdote along those lines from Marketing & Communications Manager for digital agency ChaiONE, Meghan Stephens:

    “Through Twitter, I am connected to other marketing professionals, digital creatives, community stewards, and new media experts — simply because those are the types of people that I enjoy interacting with and learning from… When it came time to look for a job in the technology sector, all I did was turn to those who I already gained inspiration from. When glancing through my stream, I saw a job link posted by my now-boss that sounded immediately like what I was looking for. I read through the description, realized I already knew the company through another connection made on Twitter, and sent in my resume.”


    5. Start a “Hire Me” Campaign


    After seeing a job posting for HeadBlade, a men’s grooming company that makes products specifically for guys that shave their heads, Eric Romer immediately set up a website, Twitter page, Facebook Page and YouTube account all in the name of nabbing the job.‘The posting for ‘Interactive and Social Media Marketing Manager’ was tweeted from the HeadBlade Twitter account, which I had been following for several months,” explained Romer. “I have been a die-hard ‘HeadBlader’ using their products religiously since 2005, so this was literally a dream job.”“While there were several channels used, Twitter was by far the most effective getting on HeadBlade’s radar,” said Romer. “I received a call from a company rep within 48 hours of my initial blog posting, and flew from Indianapolis to L.A. within 10 days for an interview.”While a full-out campaign of this nature may not be the best strategy for every job opportunity that comes along, this type of passion is what really stands out in the job recruiting process. If you encounter your dream job, go all out.


    6. Take It Offline


    Three simple words: “Let’s get coffee.”Once you’ve gained a certain level of dialogue with a potential employer, an in-person meeting can really boost the relationship.DJ Waldow, director of community at Blue Sky Factory, said that he landed his job at the company through connecting with Blue Sky Factory’s CEO Greg Cangialosi on Twitter. After initially “stalking” Cangialosi on Twitter, Waldow began engaging with him. Eventually, all of the tweets lead to an in-person meeting, which Waldow feels really sealed the deal. He wrote of the experience:

    “The transition from online to in real life is critical… All of the loose connections you’ve made with that person are suddenly solidified when you put the name/avatar/tweets together with a face. Nothing can replace this. Nothing.”


    Your Tips


    With the increasing popularity of Twitter, more and more job seekers and recruiters are turning to the social network to find leads. We suspect that a sizable number of Mashable readers have used Twitter in some way to find a job. If so, let us know about your experiences in the comments below.

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