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Archive for January, 2011

10 Jobs that Pay $70,000 Per Year

Still wondering if that college degree is worth the cost of tuition? A study from online salary database PayScale.com found that people who hold four-year college degrees will earn approximately 50 percent more than a high school grad over the course of their careers.

Even if you graduate with the average level of education debt — about $21,000, according to The Project on Student Debt — there are a range of jobs out there to help you pay it off before the term of the loan is up, if you’re diligent.

Here are ten jobs that earn at least $70,000 per year, according to PayScale, in industries that are expected to grow through 2018.

Nursing Home Manager – $75,300

If you are service-oriented, enjoy solving problems, and want your work to have meaning, consider a career in long term care management. According to the National Association of Boards of Examiners of Long Term Care Administrators (NABWEB), the increasing number of aging Americans and their improved longevity mean that demand for long term health care is on the rise. “Long term care administration exercises management and leadership skills on a daily basis to operate a business that is truly caring for people who have critical needs,” notes Steven Chies, vice president of operations, Long Term Care Services, Benedictine Health System.

Video Game Producer – $73,200

If you don’t mind working so others can play, developing gaming software may be your ticket to a good paycheck. Think it’s a niche market? The International Game Developers Association (IGDA), the largest nonprofit membership organization serving individuals who create video games, reports that interactive entertainment takes in about $9 billion dollars in the US alone. According to IGDA data, “Games are expected to surpass film box-office revenues in the next couple of years, making it the fastest growing segment of the entertainment market, and an excellent field for career advancement.”

Market Research Manager – $71,900

Want to know what makes people tick? Then there’s no better career than analyzing market research data for a business or an advertising agency. It’s a rapidly growing field, too, thanks to the competition between companies to grab market share in a tough economy. According to the BLS, demand for market and survey researchers is projected to grow 28 percent in the next few years, much faster than the average. Even better, there is no single path to entry into the field, though a business degree with a concentration in marketing is helpful. Likewise, earning a Professional Researcher Certification (PRC) from the Marketing Research Association can help you stand out from the competition.

Department Store Buyer – $70,100

Who says retail is struggling? Recent market research suggests that consumers are less uptight about spending as the post-recession. Amid this optimism, the BLS indicated the outlook for the buying and purchasing job market will enjoy 7 percent growth as we head into the next decade. Becoming a buyer for a major retail outlet usually requires a bachelor’s degree in business administration or other relevant area. Many senior-level execs began their careers as assistant buyers, but remember to turn your years of toil in a store into an asset as many entry-level jobs require general retail experience.

Regional Sales Manager – $72,600

If you enjoy working with people and have a persuasive personality, you’re probably a natural salesperson. Add in organizational and managerial expertise and you can snag the big bucks. Years of sales experience in any industry often count as much as an undergraduate degree in this expanding field. The BLS indicates that sales and marketing managers and their departments constitute some of the most important personnel in an organization and are less subject to downsizing or outsourcing than are other types of managers. Though competition is keen, the BLS estimates the field to grow by 15 percent through 2018 and certification from the National Association of Sales Professionals can put you ahead of the pack.

Geologist – $79,600

The increasing need for energy sources, environmental protection, and responsible land and water management will spur employment demand for geologists by 18 percent over the next decade. Geologists with a bachelor’s degree often begin their careers in field exploration or as research assistants or as lab technicians. Though only a handful of states require licensure, in order stay on top of the latest technologies and scientific findings, geologists should pursue continuing education and advanced credentialing according to the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

Financial Controller – $72,000

If you’ve got a head for numbers you’ll be indispensible to a variety of businesses. Almost every company and government agency employs one or more financial managers to oversee preparation of financial reports, direct investment activities, and implement cash management strategies. That’s also the reason the job market for this role is expected to grow by 8 percent through 2018, according to the BLS. A four-year degree is required to land an entry-level position but continuing education is critical to be able to keep up with global trade trends and changes in federal and state laws and regulations. Professional certifications from the likes of the CFA Institute can also broaden skills and boost earning power.

FBI Agent – $76,700

There’s no such thing as a typical day when you work for the FBI, according to the agency. FBI special agents are responsible for conducting sensitive national security investigations and for enforcing over 300 federal statutes including public corruption, civil rights, bribery, fugitive and drug-trafficking matters. With a college degree, three year’s work experience, and qualifying under one of the special agent entry programs, including accounting, information technology, language, and law, you could be on your way to an exciting and high-paying career.

Systems Analyst – $75,400

Computer geeks will be laughing all the way to the bank if they land a job as one of the growing number of systems analysts who help businesses and other organizations determine which computers and software to buy, and integrate into their existing systems. Demand for analysts will increase by 20 percent alongside the development of sophisticated technologies and the need to protect information. Employers are looking for candidates with degree in a technical field such as computer science, applied mathematics, engineering, or management information systems (MIS).

School Principal – $78,400

As a generation that’s even more populous than the Boomers, Millenials (born between 1981-1999) are the reason many schools are bursting at the seams. That’s why the BLS is predicting the demand for school principals to grow by 8 percent in the next decade. A master’s degree in education is required for the position and states require that principals to be licensed as school administrators.

Source: All salary data is from PayScale.com. The salaries listed are median, annual salaries for full-time workers with 5-8 years of experience and include any bonuses, commissions or profit sharing.

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You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

10 Jobs that Pay $70,000 Per Year

Still wondering if that college degree is worth the cost of tuition? A study from online salary database PayScale.com found that people who hold four-year college degrees will earn approximately 50 percent more than a high school grad over the course of their careers.

Even if you graduate with the average level of education debt — about $21,000, according to The Project on Student Debt — there are a range of jobs out there to help you pay it off before the term of the loan is up, if you’re diligent.

Here are ten jobs that earn at least $70,000 per year, according to PayScale, in industries that are expected to grow through 2018.

Nursing Home Manager – $75,300

If you are service-oriented, enjoy solving problems, and want your work to have meaning, consider a career in long term care management. According to the National Association of Boards of Examiners of Long Term Care Administrators (NABWEB), the increasing number of aging Americans and their improved longevity mean that demand for long term health care is on the rise. “Long term care administration exercises management and leadership skills on a daily basis to operate a business that is truly caring for people who have critical needs,” notes Steven Chies, vice president of operations, Long Term Care Services, Benedictine Health System.

Video Game Producer – $73,200

If you don’t mind working so others can play, developing gaming software may be your ticket to a good paycheck. Think it’s a niche market? The International Game Developers Association (IGDA), the largest nonprofit membership organization serving individuals who create video games, reports that interactive entertainment takes in about $9 billion dollars in the US alone. According to IGDA data, “Games are expected to surpass film box-office revenues in the next couple of years, making it the fastest growing segment of the entertainment market, and an excellent field for career advancement.”

Market Research Manager – $71,900

Want to know what makes people tick? Then there’s no better career than analyzing market research data for a business or an advertising agency. It’s a rapidly growing field, too, thanks to the competition between companies to grab market share in a tough economy. According to the BLS, demand for market and survey researchers is projected to grow 28 percent in the next few years, much faster than the average. Even better, there is no single path to entry into the field, though a business degree with a concentration in marketing is helpful. Likewise, earning a Professional Researcher Certification (PRC) from the Marketing Research Association can help you stand out from the competition.

Department Store Buyer – $70,100

Who says retail is struggling? Recent market research suggests that consumers are less uptight about spending as the post-recession. Amid this optimism, the BLS indicated the outlook for the buying and purchasing job market will enjoy 7 percent growth as we head into the next decade. Becoming a buyer for a major retail outlet usually requires a bachelor’s degree in business administration or other relevant area. Many senior-level execs began their careers as assistant buyers, but remember to turn your years of toil in a store into an asset as many entry-level jobs require general retail experience.

Regional Sales Manager – $72,600

If you enjoy working with people and have a persuasive personality, you’re probably a natural salesperson. Add in organizational and managerial expertise and you can snag the big bucks. Years of sales experience in any industry often count as much as an undergraduate degree in this expanding field. The BLS indicates that sales and marketing managers and their departments constitute some of the most important personnel in an organization and are less subject to downsizing or outsourcing than are other types of managers. Though competition is keen, the BLS estimates the field to grow by 15 percent through 2018 and certification from the National Association of Sales Professionals can put you ahead of the pack.

Geologist – $79,600

The increasing need for energy sources, environmental protection, and responsible land and water management will spur employment demand for geologists by 18 percent over the next decade. Geologists with a bachelor’s degree often begin their careers in field exploration or as research assistants or as lab technicians. Though only a handful of states require licensure, in order stay on top of the latest technologies and scientific findings, geologists should pursue continuing education and advanced credentialing according to the American Institute of Professional Geologists.

Financial Controller – $72,000

If you’ve got a head for numbers you’ll be indispensible to a variety of businesses. Almost every company and government agency employs one or more financial managers to oversee preparation of financial reports, direct investment activities, and implement cash management strategies. That’s also the reason the job market for this role is expected to grow by 8 percent through 2018, according to the BLS. A four-year degree is required to land an entry-level position but continuing education is critical to be able to keep up with global trade trends and changes in federal and state laws and regulations. Professional certifications from the likes of the CFA Institute can also broaden skills and boost earning power.

FBI Agent – $76,700

There’s no such thing as a typical day when you work for the FBI, according to the agency. FBI special agents are responsible for conducting sensitive national security investigations and for enforcing over 300 federal statutes including public corruption, civil rights, bribery, fugitive and drug-trafficking matters. With a college degree, three year’s work experience, and qualifying under one of the special agent entry programs, including accounting, information technology, language, and law, you could be on your way to an exciting and high-paying career.

Systems Analyst – $75,400

Computer geeks will be laughing all the way to the bank if they land a job as one of the growing number of systems analysts who help businesses and other organizations determine which computers and software to buy, and integrate into their existing systems. Demand for analysts will in
crease by 20 percent alongside the development of sophisticated technologies and the need to protect information. Employers are looking for candidates with degree in a technical field such as computer science, applied mathematics, engineering, or management information systems (MIS).

School Principal – $78,400

As a generation that’s even more populous than the Boomers, Millenials (born between 1981-1999) are the reason many schools are bursting at the seams. That’s why the BLS is predicting the demand for school principals to grow by 8 percent in the next decade. A master’s degree in education is required for the position and states require that principals to be licensed as school administrators.

Source: All salary data is from PayScale.com. The salaries listed are median, annual salaries for full-time workers with 5-8 years of experience and include any bonuses, commissions or profit sharing.

—————————-
————————————————————–

You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Eight Best Cities to Find Jobs in 2011 – Apply Now

We keep hearing that the economy is improving, but for job seekers looking to focus their efforts in cities with the most favorable employment atmospheres, making sense of list after list of statistics can be dizzying. Some cities have low unemployment rates while others have high expectations for business growth, and still others are seeing salary booms.
So which cities are your best all-around bets for finding a new job in 2011?
We took a look at the big picture, compiled all the winners in terms of important statistics like the most open job listings, net employment outlooks, and unemployment rates (plus a few others), and came up with this list of 2011’s best cities to find a job.



1. Washington, D.C.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is up 11 percent, it’s among the top cities in the country in terms of wage growth (0.5 percent) and annual open job listings (695,566), and it’s enjoying an unemployment rate significantly lower than the national average at 6.0 percent.



2. Phoenix, Ariz.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is on the plus side by 12 percent and it’s among the top five cities in the country in terms of wage growth (0.4 percent). In addition, annual open job listings are a respectable 186,657 and the unemployment rate is 8.5 percent.



3. Seattle, Wash.
Why it’s so great: The unemployment rate is hovering with the national average at 9.1 percent, but it has the second-highest net percentage of companies planning to add employees this year (15 percent) and it has a nice annual open job listings count of 270,747.



4. San Diego, Calif.
Why it’s so great: Despite a current unemployment rate of 10.4 percent, it’s listed among the top cities for net percentage of companies planning to add employees in 2011 (11 percent) and annual open job listings (149,513), which is a winning combination.



5. Baltimore, Md.
Why it’s so great: It’s among the 2011 top cities nationally for annual open job listings (236,672) and wage growth (1.6 percent), and also enjoys a current below-average unemployment rate of 7.8 percent.



6. Baton Rouge, La.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is a whopping 18 percent (the highest in the nation) and the unemployment rate is only 7.7 percent.



7. Milwaukee, Wis.
Why it’s so great: It ranks third nationally for net percentage of companies planning to add employees (14 percent) and has a very respectable 7.5 percent unemployment rate.



8. New York, N.Y.
Why it’s so great: Topping the nation in terms of annual open job listings (779,778), it’s also among the top five for wage growth (0.4 percent) and has an unemployment rate of 8.5 percent.

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By Rigel Celeste for AOLJobs

  ————————————————————–

If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Eight Best Cities to Find Jobs in 2011 – Apply Now

We keep hearing that the economy is improving, but for job seekers looking to focus their efforts in cities with the most favorable employment atmospheres, making sense of list after list of statistics can be dizzying. Some cities have low unemployment rates while others have high expectations for business growth, and still others are seeing salary booms.
So which cities are your best all-around bets for finding a new job in 2011?
We took a look at the big picture, compiled all the winners in terms of important statistics like the most open job listings, net employment outlooks, and unemployment rates (plus a few others), and came up with this list of 2011’s best cities to find a job.



1. Washington, D.C.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is up 11 percent, it’s among the top cities in the country in terms of wage growth (0.5 percent) and annual open job listings (695,566), and it’s enjoying an unemployment rate significantly lower than the national average at 6.0 percent.



2. Phoenix, Ariz.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is on the plus side by 12 percent and it’s among the top five cities in the country in terms of wage growth (0.4 percent). In addition, annual open job listings are a respectable 186,657 and the unemployment rate is 8.5 percent.



3. Seattle, Wash.
Why it’s so great: The unemployment rate is hovering with the national average at 9.1 percent, but it has the second-highest net percentage of companies planning to add employees this year (15 percent) and it has a nice annual open job listings count of 270,747.



4. San Diego, Calif.
Why it’s so great: Despite a current unemployment rate of 10.4 percent, it’s listed among the top cities for net percentage of companies planning to add employees in 2011 (11 percent) and annual open job listings (149,513), which is a winning combination.



5. Baltimore, Md.
Why it’s so great: It’s among the 2011 top cities nationally for annual open job listings (236,672) and wage growth (1.6 percent), and also enjoys a current below-average unemployment rate of 7.8 percent.



6. Baton Rouge, La.
Why it’s so great: The net percentage of companies planning to add employees is a whopping 18 percent (the highest in the nation) and the unemployment rate is only 7.7 percent.



7. Milwaukee, Wis.
Why it’s so great: It ranks third nationally for net percentage of companies planning to add employees (14 percent) and has a very respectable 7.5 percent unemployment rate.



8. New York, N.Y.
Why it’s so great: Topping the nation in terms of annual open job listings (779,778), it’s also among the top five for wage growth (0.4 percent) and has an unemployment rate of 8.5 percent.

—————————–
By Rigel Celeste for AOLJobs

  ————————————————————–

If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

When the New Boss Ruins Your Work Life … What to Do?

For the past few years, his working life has been fantastic. If you like your job, co-workers and wages, and the company has generous health, vacation and 401k benefits. If he had written his own ideal job description would be this.

Until recently, when his former – not to mention beautiful – head of the left. His replacement is hell on wheels. Not only always find mistakes in their work, but also makes cutting comments about their appearance.

Lately, you’ve been thinking about leaving, but do not want to give up so easily. No – at least not until you have tried to improve the situation.

Much about the happiness of work has to do with your boss. And if a manager wanted to leave, not everyone survives the change. New leaders will inevitably want to put their mark on the department. If you get off on the wrong foot, however, does not mean you have to leave. There are ways to ease a difficult transition.

Meet the new boss

Tell him you want to be the best job I can, and want to learn his style. What are the five top priorities of the chief has for the department? These may be different to the priorities of his former boss, so be prepared to shift gears.

Comment on criticism

Talk to your boss about his criticisms, but not defensive. Try a simple, “Sometimes I feel that I am not communicating well with you, or I’m doing something I disapprove.’d Appreciate some guidance on how I can offer you the support you need so you can do the job.” If your boss has serious problems with you, you will most likely leave now.

Put the head of Facility

If your new boss is filling big shoes, chances are you’re nervous about it. Criticism can be used to mask insecurity. So think of ways to put the new boss at ease. Are you working on a project that has to catch up? Write a note and summary of the information you think might help. Think about ways you could help her, not vice versa.

Meet your new boss

If possible, ask to lunch to learn more about it. Think of it as a job interview, because that’s basically what it is. Ask questions about your last job. Be careful not to get too personal, however. Getting too comfortable too quickly can lead to problems. Not to mention that many managers like to keep a veil between them and their professional employees. Listen more than talk. If you ask questions, answer them honestly but carefully. His new boss is sized up as well.

Check your attitude

When his new boss came on board, was to act on the defensive? Did you ever say: “I always do it this way,” when she asks you to do something different? Take the words “can not”, “no”, “impossible” together with other negative, of their vocabulary when asked to do something not done in his department before. Unless, of course, the suggestions that you can not really do or are illegal.

Leaving your job is a big decision. On the other hand, life is too short to be miserable 40 hours a week. And you will be unhappy if you and your new boss is very different working styles and really do not get along at work. Just be sure to consider carefully the options to make this relationship work for both.

Before leaving the company as a whole, make a personal visit and find out if there are other positions available on the company. Remember: You’re the one with the history, and would be hard pressed to lose.

When the New Boss Ruins Your Work Life … What to Do?

For the past few years, his working life has been fantastic. If you like your job, co-workers and wages, and the company has generous health, vacation and 401k benefits. If he had written his own ideal job description would be this.

Until recently, when his former – not to mention beautiful – head of the left. His replacement is hell on wheels. Not only always find mistakes in their work, but also makes cutting comments about their appearance.

Lately, you’ve been thinking about leaving, but do not want to give up so easily. No – at least not until you have tried to improve the situation.

Much about the happiness of work has to do with your boss. And if a manager wanted to leave, not everyone survives the change. New leaders will inevitably want to put their mark on the department. If you get off on the wrong foot, however, does not mean you have to leave. There are ways to ease a difficult transition.

Meet the new boss

Tell him you want to be the best job I can, and want to learn his style. What are the five top priorities of the chief has for the department? These may be different to the priorities of his former boss, so be prepared to shift gears.

Comment on criticism

Talk to your boss about his criticisms, but not defensive. Try a simple, “Sometimes I feel that I am not communicating well with you, or I’m doing something I disapprove.’d Appreciate some guidance on how I can offer you the support you need so you can do the job.” If your boss has serious problems with you, you will most likely leave now.

Put the head of Facility

If your new boss is filling big shoes, chances are you’re nervous about it. Criticism can be used to mask insecurity. So think of ways to put the new boss at ease. Are you working on a project that has to catch up? Write a note and summary of the information you think might help. Think about ways you could help her, not vice versa.

Meet your new boss

If possible, ask to lunch to learn more about it. Think of it as a job interview, because that’s basically what it is. Ask questions about your last job. Be careful not to get too personal, however. Getting too comfortable too quickly can lead to problems. Not to mention that many managers like to keep a veil between them and their professional employees. Listen more than talk. If you ask questions, answer them honestly but carefully. His new boss is sized up as well.

Check your attitude

When his new boss came on board, was to act on the defensive? Did you ever say: “I always do it this way,” when she asks you to do something different? Take the words “can not”, “no”, “impossible” together with other negative, of their vocabulary when asked to do something not done in his department before. Unless, of course, the suggestions that you can not really do or are illegal.

Leaving your job is a big decision. On the other hand, life is too short to be miserable 40 hours a week. And you will be unhappy if you and your new boss is very different working styles and really do not get along at work. Just be sure to consider carefully the options to make this relationship work for both.

Before leaving the company as a whole, make a personal visit and find out if there are other positions available on the company. Remember: You’re the one with the history, and would be hard pressed to lose.

Ten Most Flexible Jobs and What They Pay (salary mentioned)

Does the thought of working hours from 9 to 5 you afraid of? Do you want the time to go to the gym in the middle of the day or spend time with their children after school?

Flexible work is needed. Flexibility is becoming more and more essential than busy people, parents, in particular, need space in your schedule to do her life without problems.

Baseline data salary and career PayScale.com work recently surveyed Americans to find out how they rated their level of flexibility work. People in the survey described their work as highly flexible, ticking the “On any given day, I can change my schedule and free time.”

The following are jobs that took first place for flexibility in the survey of PayScale. You will know what percentage of respondents in a particular job, described him as a great flexibility and what is their total annual compensation for the job, according to the PayScale database. Will also describe some of the requirements to get started, if you are ready for a career change.

1. Web design and development

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 82%

Median annual salary: $ 52,000

All successful businesses want an easy to use, attractive website. Web developers have the software, tools and knowledge necessary to design and develop websites from scratch. A four-year degree in computer related field preferred, but many web development skills can be self taught. Further study is always necessary to keep up with technology.

2. Software Developer

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 81%

Annual salary: $ 73,000

Here is another job that is not only flexible, but it is true that demand now and in the future. Software design software for computer game developers, operating systems and other products using coding languages and principles of computing. Skills can be learned through books and online courses, while employers are looking for the first time candidates with four-year degrees, computer science.

3. Assistant Accountant

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 78%

Median annual salary: $ 39,000

Detail-oriented? Happy in the midst of numbers, graphs and tables? Helping a full timer can be a very flexible, with growth potential. The job does not require an advanced degree, and many of the skills can be learned on the job. You will succeed or fail depending on how many errors you catch and the number of columns add up right.

4. Human Resource Generalist

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 75%

Annual salary: $ 49,000

This is a job for a people person with a strong work ethic. You can help companies attract the best talent, we will go bad performance, design of benefit plans and parts of the plan of the company. Educational requirements vary, but people with degrees in four years will have the best job prospects.

5. News reporter

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 75%

Annual salary: $ 35.000

Although there are fewer of them, jobs are not written daily. The competition is highest in major publications, but you may be able to set foot in the door with a small role, local. If you have a way with the written word, this is a job you can do whenever it’s convenient for you. Just meet your deadlines. A journalism degree four years of English is preferred, although some solid writing samples can start with less.

6. Financial Analyst

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 74%

Median annual salary: $ 59,000

Financial analysts have the important job of research and recommend places for individuals, companies and governments to invest their money. You may be meeting with a client in town for the morning and spend their evenings at his desk a report. As an expert, has great flexibility. Most financial analysts have a college degree in business, accounting, statistics, or finance, and an MBA will increase employment prospects.

7. Film / Video Editor

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 72%

Annual salary: $ 46,000

Here’s a great job for the movie fans out there who appreciate how the transition scenes, music comes and goes, and build stories. If you want to be part of deciding how films, commercials and web videos are put together, training in a community or technical college can begin. Getting a gig can be competitive, though, so a four-year degree help your chances.

8. Employment, Recruitment, or Placement Specialist

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 71%

Annual salary: $ 50.000

Here is another job where interpersonal skills are key. A recruiter helps employers find the right candidate for a job. To do the job, you need to maintain relationships with its clients, employers and working many possible candidates might be the perfect choice. Opportunities in this field tend to grow. A four-year degree is typical, although no specific major recruiters, as well as business-related classes in school is a good idea.

9. Dietary

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 71%

Annual salary: $ 49,000

Dietitians can help people eat well enough so they can maintain a healthy weight, prevent disease or recover from being sick. Many work in hospitals, but you can also find jobs in nursing care facilities and doctors. As experts in their field, dietitians have more opportunities for your schedule. At least a bachelor’s degree in a related field is required, as well as licensing and certification, which varies slightly by state. Specialty education and further enhance employment opportunities.



10. Data Analyst

People in this study reporting high flexibility: 70%

Median annual salary: $ 52,000

This is a flexible job that also has huge growth potential. As technology continues to grow, so do the piles of data that businesses, governments and organizations want to classify and learn. A data analyst can determine which clients are most often on the weekend or that doctors use the least amount of medication in treating their patients. The job requires a four-year degree and training in the workplace.

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You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm


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