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When the New Boss Ruins Your Work Life … What to Do?

For the past few years, his working life has been fantastic. If you like your job, co-workers and wages, and the company has generous health, vacation and 401k benefits. If he had written his own ideal job description would be this.

Until recently, when his former – not to mention beautiful – head of the left. His replacement is hell on wheels. Not only always find mistakes in their work, but also makes cutting comments about their appearance.

Lately, you’ve been thinking about leaving, but do not want to give up so easily. No – at least not until you have tried to improve the situation.

Much about the happiness of work has to do with your boss. And if a manager wanted to leave, not everyone survives the change. New leaders will inevitably want to put their mark on the department. If you get off on the wrong foot, however, does not mean you have to leave. There are ways to ease a difficult transition.

Meet the new boss

Tell him you want to be the best job I can, and want to learn his style. What are the five top priorities of the chief has for the department? These may be different to the priorities of his former boss, so be prepared to shift gears.

Comment on criticism

Talk to your boss about his criticisms, but not defensive. Try a simple, “Sometimes I feel that I am not communicating well with you, or I’m doing something I disapprove.’d Appreciate some guidance on how I can offer you the support you need so you can do the job.” If your boss has serious problems with you, you will most likely leave now.

Put the head of Facility

If your new boss is filling big shoes, chances are you’re nervous about it. Criticism can be used to mask insecurity. So think of ways to put the new boss at ease. Are you working on a project that has to catch up? Write a note and summary of the information you think might help. Think about ways you could help her, not vice versa.

Meet your new boss

If possible, ask to lunch to learn more about it. Think of it as a job interview, because that’s basically what it is. Ask questions about your last job. Be careful not to get too personal, however. Getting too comfortable too quickly can lead to problems. Not to mention that many managers like to keep a veil between them and their professional employees. Listen more than talk. If you ask questions, answer them honestly but carefully. His new boss is sized up as well.

Check your attitude

When his new boss came on board, was to act on the defensive? Did you ever say: “I always do it this way,” when she asks you to do something different? Take the words “can not”, “no”, “impossible” together with other negative, of their vocabulary when asked to do something not done in his department before. Unless, of course, the suggestions that you can not really do or are illegal.

Leaving your job is a big decision. On the other hand, life is too short to be miserable 40 hours a week. And you will be unhappy if you and your new boss is very different working styles and really do not get along at work. Just be sure to consider carefully the options to make this relationship work for both.

Before leaving the company as a whole, make a personal visit and find out if there are other positions available on the company. Remember: You’re the one with the history, and would be hard pressed to lose.

12 Traits of a great boss .. (MSN popular opinion)

For many people, a cardinal sin is thinking they’re perfect. Job seekers think they’re not making any job-search mistakes. Employees “always” do the best they can. And bosses are always great.

Right.

Unfortunately, in real life, nobody’s perfect — not even you, Mr. Boss Man. In fact, many bosses assume they’re doing a good job at managing their employees when the opposite is the reality.

“Such situations occur frequently, quite simply because the boss does not have accurate feedback,” says Sandra Naiman, author of “The High Achiever’s Secret Codebook: The Unwritten Rules for Success at Work.” “Often, employees don’t tell him or her what they really think.”


In reality, being a good boss isn’t as easy as it sounds. Just because you’re the boss doesn’t mean that you can tell people what to do and they’ll do it, Naiman  says. And even if they do, that doesn’t make you a good boss.

“The role is really one of supporting and motivating people to do a good job. This means you have to understand what motivates people, be constantly available to them, be a role model and adjust your style to suit each individual direct report,” she says.

Here are 12 things that good bosses do, according to Naiman and Vicki Salemi, author of “Big Career in the Big City.

1. Ask employees how you can best support them in doing their job. “This ensures that you are doing your best job to help your employees do theirs,” Naiman says.

2. Make sure that employees have all the information, resources and support they need to do their job. “It also demonstrates that you see yourself as [being] there to support them,” Naiman adds.

3. Give continuous feedback, both positive and constructive. “This helps the employee develop [professionally] and avoids surprises during performance reviews,” Naiman says.

4. Provide opportunities for professional growth. “This lets employees know that you are in their corner,” Naiman says.

5. Don’t let employees know of your own job concerns or challenges or problems in your personal life. “This prevents employees from feeling that they have to take care of their boss,” Naiman says. “A good boss is perceived as competent and there to support his or her employees.”

6. Create trust. “A good boss is a trusted boss. So, keep promises, follow through on commitments [and] never betray a confidence or talk about others in the organization, except in a favorable way,” Naiman says.

7. Show compassion. “Treat employees like they’re people. Not employees, but people. If one of your direct reports had a death in the family or even a bad day, be human and compassionate,” Salemi says.

8. Listen. “One of the best traits of a boss is someone who not only goes to the wall for their employees but who also listens to them,” Salemi says. “Sometimes team members just need to vent and get things off their chest. A good boss will listen.”

9. Give frequent feedback. “Instead of waiting until an annual performance review to give feedback — good or bad a sign of an excellent boss is proactive behavior,” Salemi says. “A fantastic boss will get the most out of his or her employees. Giving positive feedback and acknowledging a job well-done often results in more good work.”

10. Understand your employees’ jobs. When you don’t completely understand what your employees do or how they do it, it’s more difficult to help them navigate their job if they need more resources, Salemi says. “Plus, a good boss should go to bat for his or her employees. If they don’t understand the magnitude of their direct reports’ job responsibilities, this may be harder to do or convince the higher-ups of their worth.”

11. Live and breathe by the company rules. If you show up late, take long lunches or are not available at certain periods throughout the day, people notice, Salemi  says. “Rules aren’t just for direct reports to abide by. A good boss will know that their behavior is to be emulated,” she says. “If the rules don’t apply to them, who should they apply to? A true leader takes this very seriously.”

12. Acknowledge your employees’ work. “Recognize their performance. Even as employees go through a busy season or may be inundated with job sharing in this economy, a good manager will keep them motivated by putting wind in their sails and, more importantly, keep turnover low,” Salemi says. “If you have a good boss, you’re golden, you won’t want to leave. When you know your boss is on your side, it makes a difference in your productivity, morale and overall workplace happiness.”

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By Rachel Farrell, Special to CareerBuilder


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Ten Secrets to Getting Promoted (Guaranteed)

You have a spotless attendance record, a blemish-free work record, you have even attended those office weekend outings and gamely did the “trust” exercises, and still, when promotion time rolls around, you find yourself shut out again. What went wrong?
“I’ve seen too many people make basic, avoidable, mistakes that are held against them and affect their promotability for years,” says author Carolyn Thompson whose new book, ‘Ten Secrets to Getting Promoted,’ tackles that touchy subject.
With over 20 years experience in executive recruiting and coaching, Thompson engaged the help of many executives who had both promoted people, and been promoted themselves, to share their insights into what makes someone promotable.
Q. What are some examples of mistakes people make when trying to get promoted?
A. The majority of mistakes fall under communications:
  • Something they said (or typed), with the best intentions, was misinterpreted.
  • Openly finding fault with or questioning management’s motives in the workplace. While they may think that no one is listening, they are really setting themselves up for failure.
  • Offering opinions on things without being asked rather than sticking to the facts, and when upset or angry they voice those opinions in the workplace, which creates a reputation of being a complainer.
Q. Without giving away your entire book, what are some of the secrets to getting promoted?
A. It sounds simple, but dress for success, surround yourself with others that are getting promoted, and be professional and courteous to everyone even if they’ve made a mistake on your payroll. Kindness goes a long way and is noticed and rewarded by others.
Q. One point in your book I found interesting is keeping the contents of an inter-office e-mail to three sentences. Why? And why three and not four or two?
A. Four sentences runs into what could probably be better and more efficiently expressed in a conversation, particularly if a response is required. Improving interpersonal communications is high on executives’ lists of areas for improvement in the work force. One or two sentences could be interpreted as being short and, again, people read between the lines for the subtext and tone of your note, which can be easily misinterpreted by the reader.
Q. How do you tread the fine line between “brown-nosing” and trying to get ahead?
A. Being genuine in your interaction and focusing on what’s in it for them and not what’s in it for you will ensure you’re not over the top.
Q. What happens if someone has followed all these “secrets,” but finds him- or herself being passed over? Should they stay or go?
A. Sometimes it’s time to go; but you shouldn’t immediately exit unless you’ve truly applied yourself to solving any issues that have arisen. The root of all conflict is unmet expectations. If you find yourself frustrated with your boss or coworker, ask yourself, “What is the expectation I have of them that they aren’t meeting?” Similarly, if your supervisor is not appearing pleased with your performance, try to identify what expectation they have of you that you’re missing. Asking them professionally and privately is a great way to find out, but you have to be ready to receive the information constructively and not take a defensive posture.
Q. Right, the “blame game” — blaming others for getting passed up.
A. I hear a lot of people complaining that their career path is being controlled by someone else, and that’s just not true. We are all in control of our own futures. If someone finds themselves blaming others for everything that’s gone wrong in their career, it might be worth it to look inward to see what behaviors they may have displayed that caused them to be so disgruntled in the first place.
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Negotiate a higher salary in 2011? It’s possible.

If you’re currently employed and are wondering about next year’s salary, brace yourself. We’re about to say something you don’t usually hear: The economy is working in your favor.
According to a recent CareerBuilder survey, 31 percent of employers are willing to negotiate salary increases with their current employees next year. Could this be tied to the fact that 43 percent of employers are concerned that their best workers are going to pick up and bolt as soon as the economy improves and more businesses are hiring?
The fear of losing in-demand workers does seem to factor in to how much negotiating your boss is willing to do. At least, the industries with high demands are the ones with the most wiggle room. When it comes to negotiating with current employers in 2011, who’s willing to talk it out?
  • 45 percent of IT employers
  • 41 percent of professional and business services employers
  • 39 percent of retail employers
  • 38 percent of sales employers
If you’re looking for a new job, don’t think your salary has been left out in the cold. Half of employers will leave some room for negotiation when they make a job offer to a new employee. And 21 percent of employers are willing to extend multiple offers to the same candidate, so some job seekers have more room to play hardball.
What should you expect?
Just because employers are willing to negotiate salaries, don’t assume you’re going to get a raise just by saying, “More money, please!” Before your boss can consider giving you a raise, you need to give him or her a reason to do so. When asked what you can do to improve your chances of getting a fatter paycheck, employers cited these methods as the most effective:
  • Cite specific accomplishments
  • Present the salary range you want and be able to justify it
  • Display an understanding of what’s important to the company
  • Bring your past performance reviews with you
If you walk into the meeting with enough preparation, you’ll hopefully walk out of it with a higher salary. However, not all bosses are in the position to offer higher salaries. Your boss might be on your side and think you’re worth the extra money, but the higher ups won’t put any extra dollars in the budget. That’s when you and your boss can shift your focus to other perks. Remember, compensation includes more than just a dollar amount, although everyone loves a hefty paycheck.
If they can’t offer you more money, surveyed bosses are willing to extend other offers to you in hopes of keeping you satisfied. These perks are the most popular you’re likely to receive in lieu of a higher salary:
  • More flexible hours
  • Bonuses
  • Training
  • Vacation
  • Most casual dress code
Although salaries probably won’t skyrocket in 2011 and employers continue to be cautiously optimistic about the economy, take heart that bosses are willing to have these conversations at all. In worse climates, think 2008, bosses had layoffs on their minds, not salary negotiations. So let’s hope this is the beginning of a trend to higher paychecks in the future.
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Ten Jobs That Pay $80,000 Per Year …

What do Lauren Bush’s engagement ring, and the Icon CJ3B Army Jeep have in common? They’re two of the things you can buy with $80,000. And while most working stiffs can only dream of plunking down that kind of cash, the median family income in the U.S. brings in only around $50,000 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) there are some career tracks that can bring those luxury visions a little closer to reality.

Here are ten jobs that earn at least $80,000, according to online salary database PayScale.com, all in industries that are expected to grow through 2018.


01. Commercial Jet Pilot
Median Income: $89,600

The sky’s literally the limit if you’ve always dreamed of flying for a living. According the International Airline Pilots Association, there are many paths to the cockpit but you must have a combination of pilot certificates and ratings, as well as flight experience, and a great attitude. Veterans of the armed services are particularly in demand due to the military’s excellent training and the well-rounded education such a background provides. Bonus: the military route won’t cost a thing.
Commercial Jet Pilot Jobs

 
 

02. Clinical Trial Manager
Median Income: $88,800

From doctors and nurses, to teachers and statisticians, clinical research professionals can come from a wide variety of careers. Training often happens on the job – including everything from testing drugs, to medical equipment, or other biological products. While breaking into the lucrative field of clinical research does require a Bachelor’s degree, pursuing a clinical research curriculum can be done online or through a community college with flexible hours, according to the Society of Clinical Research Associates (SoCra).
Clinical Trial Manager Jobs

 
03. Chief Lobbyist
Median Income: $88,700

Public relations professionals take note: if you’re passionate about a cause or special interest your skills are perfectly suited to a lobbying firm. Lobbyists can be found on the staffs of corporations, industry trade-organizations, unions, or public interest groups. Lobbyists are employed to help influence legislators in favor of the industries they represent.
Chief Lobbyist Jobs

 
04. Security Architect, IT
Median Income: $88,100

Keeping hackers at bay is just one of the daily challenges IT security architects face on the job. Those who set up, test, and enforce corporate security policies don’t have time to get bored. Security needs are ever-changing and an architect needs to be adaptable and keep up with the latest technology. Earning certification via a professional organization such as the SANS (SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security) Institute will help boost both job and salary prospects.

 
 

05. Pharmaceutical Sales Representative
Median Income: $87,900

There are literally thousands of medications available to help diagnose, prevent, and treat disease. It takes a legion of talented sales people to put those drugs into the hands of health care professionals. However, this high-growth field is competitive, and membership in a professional organization such as the National Association of Pharmaceutical Representatives (NAPRx) will help entry-level reps network and learn how to get a leg up in the field.
Pharmaceutical Sales Representative Jobs

 
06. Oil Well Driller
Median Income: $85,100

The global demand for oil and gas continues unabated. It is possible to enter the field with only a high school diploma as a roughneck or roustabout, and train on-the-job, or for college students to secure an internship or part-time employment as an assistant drillers. Either way, the opportunity for promotions is great for self-motivated, diligent workers.
Oil Well Driller Jobs

 
07. Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager
Median Income: $84,000

You won’t have to master the martial arts, but you will have to pass a number of exams on your way to obtaining a Six Sigma Black Belt. This business management strategy is used in a variety of industries from education and government, to healthcare and manufacturing, as a standard of quality to improve processes. The American Society for Quality (ASQ) offers an internationally-recognized certification track that can help you stand out from the competition, not to mention improve your project management skills.
Six Sigma Black Belt Project Manager Jobs

 
08. Certified Nurse Midwife
Median Income: $82,700

With increasing demand for natural and home-based childbirth, certified nurse midwives provide a holistic approach to delivering babies, working both with obstetricians as well as on their own. But their work doesn’t stop with childbirth. Midwives can provide continuing care and counseling to women of all ages, according to the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM). Most are registered nurses who have graduated from a nurse-midwifery education program, and are certified by the ACNM.
Certified Nurse Midwife Jobs

 
09. Auditing Manager
Median Income: $81,400

There are many types of auditing managers but for most thier responsabilites include evaluating and manageing their organizations’s risk, as well as the ethics and values within their organization, according to the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA). Financial auditors analyze and communicate financial information and can be found working for various entities such as companies or individual clients, as well as federal, state, and local governments.
Auditing Manager Jobs

 
10. Supply Chain Manager
Median Income: $80,000

Helping businesses save money by streamlining processes for manufacturing and delivering goods has become increasingly important during the recession. In addition to a bachelor’s degree, candidates who earn certification in production and inventory management, offered by such organizations as the Association for Operations Management (APICS), will stack the hiring odds in their favor by mastering resource and strategic planning, scheduling, and production operations.
Supply Chain Manager Jobs
 

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6 Ways to Score a Job Through Twitter

Twitter has become a great resource for just about anything, including jobs. From industry chats to Twitter accounts dedicated to posting vacancies, there are a ton of resources for landing a gig.
We’ve already chronicled how to get a job through Facebook (Facebook) and YouTube (YouTube), and now we’re taking a look at the job hunting process on Twitter.
We spoke with nine Tweeters who have landed jobs through Twitter (Twitter) to get their top tips for success on the platform. Below you’ll find a guide to their job hunt strategies on the microblogging service.
If you’ve also been successful in finding a position via Twitter, let us know about your experience in the comments below.

1. Tweet Like an Industry Expert


Words to tweet by: You are what you tweet. Keep in mind that everything you tweet lends to or takes away from your online persona. Whether or not you’re searching for a job, make sure your Twitter stream represents you as a professional individual that has important and unique thoughts to contribute. Your goal should be to become an industry expert or at least tweet like one.
Share links that are relevant to your followers, adding commentary to the latest industry news. This shows that you’re keeping up with industry trends and gives potential employers a look into what you read and care about, which will help them to envision how you may fit into their company’s work environment.
If your commentary on Twitter is interesting enough, you may have employers knocking on your door. Christa Keizer, a recent intern at Cone, a strategy and communications firm, used Twitter during her job search to “[post] relevant, industry-related tweets on a daily basis to establish credibility.” After commenting on one of Cone’s blogs, Marcus Andrews, the New Media Associate at Cone, tweeted to Keizer, thanking her for her comment and asking her about her summer work plans. A few tweets and an interview later, Keizer was hired.
Kate Ottavio, an account executive at PR agency Quinn & Co., had a similar experience. Prior to working at Quinn, she worked at a small PR agency in Connecticut. One day, Allyns Melendez, HR Director at Quinn, started following Ottavio on Twitter she waited for Ottavio to follow back, and then asked her if she’d like to move to New York, where Quinn is headquartered. Little did she know, Melendez was looking for a new hire for the real estate division of the firm. Melendez had first searched for “PR” and “real estate” on LinkedIn (LinkedIn), where Ottavio’s profile popped up.
Although Ottavio wasn’t looking for a job at the time, her Twitter strategy had always been to “represent myself as a knowledgeable and reputable PR professional. I tweet about 10-20 times a day about anything from personal experiences to Mashable (Mashable) articles to PR blog posts.” Loving the opportunity that Quinn presented her, she promptly accepted.

2. Use Twitter Hashtags


There are lots of ways to use Twitter hashtags to get a job. Here are a few types of hashtags to get you started:
  • Job Listings: You can find general job advice and lots of listings through hashtags like #jobs, #recruiting, #jobadvice, #jobposting, #jobhunt and #jobsearch. To narrow it down, though, seek out more specific hashtags, such as or #prjobs or #salesjobs.
  • Industry Conferences: Most conferences these days have their own hashtags when a relevant industry conference is approaching, get active with attendees using the hashtag. Whether you’re attending the conference or not, you can contribute to the conversation. Many conferences also have live streams, so it’s as if you’re attending anyway! Live tweet panels and speeches that you’re interested in and connect with other tweeters along the way. By using Twitter for networking within your industry, you’ll increase your chances of getting hired down the road.
  • Job-Related and Industry Chats: Getting involved with industry chats is a way to show your industry in a particular field and represent yourself as a knowledgeable person. Check out this Twitter chat schedule to get a head start. Also, if your search isn’t going so well, get involved in job-related chats, such as #jobhuntchat, #careerchat, #internchat and #hirefriday for friendly advice.
  • Liz (Pope) Schmidt, now the media and research manager at Sevans Strategy, attested to the power of industry Twitter chats: “I began participating in #Journchat, created and hosted by Sarah Evans [owner of Sevans Strategy, a public relations and new media consultancy]. Although I had known Sarah from a past virtual work experience, I was able to reconnect with her through Twitter. I mentioned her in several tweets and participated in her online discussions. Soon after, based on a direct message conversation with Sarah on Twitter, I came on board at Sevans Strategy.”Besides scouring job search hashtags, job seekers can also follow Twitter accounts dedicated to posting job openings, use Twitter search to find postings or keep an eye out on the Twitter streams of companies they might want to work for.


    3. Connect with Recruiters and Current Employees


    Don’t be afraid to research the companies that you want to work for to find out who currently works there and who is involved with recruiting. After all, while you’re searching for a job, recruiters are scouring the web at the same time looking for pertinent information about job candidates. Interacting with current employees and active recruiters is an easy way to learn more about a company and its job opportunities.Take Connie Zheng’s word she’s already been hired for two jobs through Twitter. “I got my PR internship at Text 100 using Twitter, as well as my entry-level position at Burson-Marsteller using Twitter,” she explained. She advises job seekers, “Use Twitter as a research tool to identify who the appropriate HR person or recruiter is at the desired company.”Shankar Ganesh, a student at the Shanmugha Arts, Science, Technology and Research Academy in India, recently landed a marketing consulting internship at business apps provider Zoho Corporation by connecting with a technologist employed by the company. “I wanted to spend my summer as an intern at Zoho (zoho), so I approached employees using Twitter,” he recounted. “I showed them what I had done previously and my website for credibility. My interest was forwarded to Zoho’s HR team, and we got in touch.” Soon after, he was offered the internship.Even if a company isn’t hiring, it’s a good idea to stay in contact with recruiters and employees. When a position opens up, it’s likely that you’ll be one of the first to be contacted, said Alison Morris, an account coordinator at The CHT Group, a strategic communications firm based in Boston. Morris told us how she landed her current position on Twitter:

    “In April 2010, Ben Hendricks, Senior VP at The CHT Group, and I began corresponding about corporate communications and social media’s role in the corporate environment. Much to my dismay, CHT was not yet hiring. In June, after a few months distance, Ben sent me an email to let me know the agency was hiring and that he wanted me to apply. Still looking for a job, I sent over my resume, and about a week later, I was employed.”

    Keep an eye out for socially savvy companies like CHT it also recently hired Marissa Green as an account coordinator through Twitter and is now looking for a spring intern, with Twitter being one of its main recruiting outlets.


    4. Build a Relevant Network


    A lot of successful Twitter job stories actually end with the punchline, “I wasn’t even looking for a job.” In many cases, these lucky new hires just found interesting opportunities serendipitously, which makes sense given that it’s Twitter we’re talking about.Twitter is all about networking, so build a network that makes sense for you. You’ll find that a lot of the opportunities that are presented to you are simply organic. Here’s an anecdote along those lines from Marketing & Communications Manager for digital agency ChaiONE, Meghan Stephens:

    “Through Twitter, I am connected to other marketing professionals, digital creatives, community stewards, and new media experts — simply because those are the types of people that I enjoy interacting with and learning from… When it came time to look for a job in the technology sector, all I did was turn to those who I already gained inspiration from. When glancing through my stream, I saw a job link posted by my now-boss that sounded immediately like what I was looking for. I read through the description, realized I already knew the company through another connection made on Twitter, and sent in my resume.”


    5. Start a “Hire Me” Campaign


    After seeing a job posting for HeadBlade, a men’s grooming company that makes products specifically for guys that shave their heads, Eric Romer immediately set up a website, Twitter page, Facebook Page and YouTube account all in the name of nabbing the job.‘The posting for ‘Interactive and Social Media Marketing Manager’ was tweeted from the HeadBlade Twitter account, which I had been following for several months,” explained Romer. “I have been a die-hard ‘HeadBlader’ using their products religiously since 2005, so this was literally a dream job.”“While there were several channels used, Twitter was by far the most effective getting on HeadBlade’s radar,” said Romer. “I received a call from a company rep within 48 hours of my initial blog posting, and flew from Indianapolis to L.A. within 10 days for an interview.”While a full-out campaign of this nature may not be the best strategy for every job opportunity that comes along, this type of passion is what really stands out in the job recruiting process. If you encounter your dream job, go all out.


    6. Take It Offline


    Three simple words: “Let’s get coffee.”Once you’ve gained a certain level of dialogue with a potential employer, an in-person meeting can really boost the relationship.DJ Waldow, director of community at Blue Sky Factory, said that he landed his job at the company through connecting with Blue Sky Factory’s CEO Greg Cangialosi on Twitter. After initially “stalking” Cangialosi on Twitter, Waldow began engaging with him. Eventually, all of the tweets lead to an in-person meeting, which Waldow feels really sealed the deal. He wrote of the experience:

    “The transition from online to in real life is critical… All of the loose connections you’ve made with that person are suddenly solidified when you put the name/avatar/tweets together with a face. Nothing can replace this. Nothing.”


    Your Tips


    With the increasing popularity of Twitter, more and more job seekers and recruiters are turning to the social network to find leads. We suspect that a sizable number of Mashable readers have used Twitter in some way to find a job. If so, let us know about your experiences in the comments below.

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The 10 Hottest Private Companies in Tech

SecondMarket, a firm that facilitates alternative investments, has shared with Mashable (Mashable) a list of private companies its buyers and potential buyers were most interested in this year. The list is based on the percentage who indicated they were interested in each company.
  • 1. Facebook (Facebook): More than 25% of the firm’s buyers and potential buyers indicated that they were interested in Facebook. With the company reportedly on track to bring in $2 billion in revenue this year and attracting 81% of Gen Yers daily, it’s easy to see why.
  • 2. LinkedIn (LinkedIn): Last month, the professional social networking platform announced that it was adding a member every second to its 85 million-person community. Earlier this year, estimates placed LinkedIn’s valuation at $2 billion.
  • 3. Twitter (Twitter): Twitter finally tried to make money this year with promoted tweets, and it bodes well that beta testers are finding the new marketing channel valuable. The company just raised another $200 million that values it at a reported $3.7 billion.
  • 4. Zynga: The New York Times pondered whether Zynga might be the “Google (Google) of Games” this year. The company has more than 45 million active users on its social games like FarmVille and Mafia Wars.
  • 5. Craigslist (Craigslist): Craigslist makes money on recruitment listings, and it used to make money on adult services listings. Alas (for Craigslist, at least), the questionably legal section that expected to comprise about 30% of its revenue was shut down yesterday.
  • 6. Groupon: Google was willing to pay $5.3 billion for the group-buying company, which has about an $800 million annual gross revenue run rate.
  • 7. Yelp (Yelp): This year Yelp took new funding and challenged Foursquare (foursquare) and Groupon with new features.
  • 8. SecondMarket: Given that the investors who indicated SecondMarket was an interest were signing up to buy through SecondMarket, this one isn’t a surprise.
  • 9. Pandora (Pandora): Pandora reported its first profitable quarter — and $50 million in revenue — at the end of 2009. Earlier this year, a Wall Street analyst predicted the company’s 2010 revenue would reach $100 million.
  • 10. Bloom Energy: Building a refrigerator-sized box that can power a whole house with sand-based fuel cells will inevitably attract some attention from investors. Before the Bloom Box launch, it’s rumored that the company had already won more than $400 million in funding.
Do you agree with SecondMarket’s users? What companies would you add to this list? Tell us in the comments below.
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