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Archive for the ‘Engineering Jobs’ Category

25 Companies Hiring This Month August 2010 – No. of Posts and Locations are also given

If you’ve ever found yourself in a job search, you know the frustration that often accompanies it. You’ve prepared your résumé, pressed your suit, practiced your interview answers and are ready to go. All you need is that job offer.

The entire job search process can feel like a test of patience. You can only write and rewrite your résumé so many times before you want to pull out your hair. Although revising your cover letter and attending networking events are excellent ways to be a great job candidate, you can get burned out quickly. And if your job search lasts for several months, the burnout can linger.

In order to ease some of the anxiety of a job hunt, we’ve decided to bring the jobs to you. Across all industries throughout the country, these companies are ready to hire qualified workers in August. In other words, they want hard workers like you. You’ve spent a lot of your energy getting ready for the right job, so we have put together a list of 25 companies hiring right now:

Adventist Health System
Industry: Health care
Number of openings: 1,200
Sample job titles: Registered nurse, nursing, physical therapist, occupational therapist, pharmacist, speech language pathologist, physician, physician assistant, management, supply chain, nutrition services, human resources, information technology, accounting, marketing
Location: Florida, Texas, Illinois, Georgia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Kansas, Colorado, Kentucky, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Missouri

AT&T
Industry: Telecommunications
Number of openings: 2,000
Sample job titles: Retail sales consultants, retail store managers, call center customer service representatives, premises technicians
Location: Nationwide

Auto-Wares
Industry: Automotive parts/retail
Number of openings: 57
Sample job titles: Counter sales, parts delivery
Location: Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Ohio

CB Richard Ellis, Inc.
Industry: Corporate real estate
Number of openings: 187
Sample job titles: Service engineer, senior IT BSA, financial analyst
Location: New York, Los Angeles, Dallas, and more.

Comerica Bank
Industry: Banking/financial services
Number of openings: 50
Sample job titles: Customer service representatives, assistant banking center managers, banking center managers and commercial banking officers
Location: Texas, Arizona, California, Florida and Michigan

Enterprise Rent-A-Car
Industry: Travel/tourism
Number of openings: 500
Sample job titles: Sales/management trainee
Location: Nationwide

Freeport McMoRan
Industry: Mining
Number of openings: 450
Sample job titles: Architect, mechanical engineer, accountant, benefits analyst, truck driver, mechanic
Location: Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Texas, Connecticut

Gentex Corporation
Industry: Automotive electronics
Number of openings: 140
Sample job titles: Production team members, electrical design engineers, software development engineers, electrical project engineers, program managers, technical team leaders, manufacturing process technicians, software test engineers, product design engineers
Location: Zeeland, Mich.

Go Wireless
Industry: Retail
Number of openings: 75
Sample job titles: Store manager, sales associate
Location: New York, New Jersey, Florida

Guitar Center
Industry: Retail
Number of openings: 55
Sample job titles: CRM business architect, manager of user experience, senior marketing campaign analyst
Location: Westlake Village, Calif.

Harland Clarke
Industry: Marketing services and technology solutions
Number of openings: 50
Sample job titles: Senior programmer analyst, systems admin engineer, customer care specialists
Location: San Antonio, Glen Burnie, Md.

HealthPort
Industry: Electronic medical records
Number of openings: 60
Sample job titles: Medical record techs, IT
Location: Atlanta

Holland America
Industry: Leisure/entertainment
Number of openings: 65
Sample job titles: Reservation sales, oracle developer, maintenance engineer, marketing specialist
Location: Seattle

Intercontinental Capital Group
Industry: Mortgage
Number of openings: 100
Sample job titles: Loan consultants, team leaders
Location: New York, Phoenix, King of Prussia, Penn., Columbus, Boca Raton

LMS Intellibound
Industry: Industrial
Number of openings: 56
Sample job titles: Site manager, warehouse supervisor, unloader, administrative
Location: North Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, South Carolina, New York, Maryland, Mississippi, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana

Marcus and Millichap
Industry: Commercial real estate
Number of openings: 90
Sample job titles: Commercial real estate agent, commercial real estate investment broker, executive assistant, brokerage administrator
Location: California, Texas, Arizona, Nevada, Minnesota, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Florida, and more

MetLife Home Loans
Industry: Mortgage Banking
Number of openings: 250
Sample job titles: Mortgage loan specialist, closer, funder, underwriter, underwriting manager, operations manager
Location: Atlanta, Chicago, Dallas, Denver, Los Angeles, Hauppauge, N.Y.

Millennium Pharmacy Systems, Inc.
Industry: Health care (pharmacy services, long-term care)
Number of openings: 60
Sample job titles: Staff pharmacists, dispensing pharmacist, pharmacy techs, customer service representatives, customer service supervisors, customer advocate, staff accountant
Location: Rhode Island, North Carolina, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Florida, Maryland, Washington, D.C. and Illinois

National Agents Alliance
Industry: Insurance
Number of openings: 321
Sample job titles: Insurance sales representative (entry level and experienced), administrative assistant, recruiter
Location: Nationwide

Plymouth Auctioneering
Industry: Arts and entertainment/sales
Number of openings: 60
Sample job titles: Traveling art auction sales professional
Location: International travel (100 percent travel)

Saber Healthcare
Industry: Health care
Number of openings: 55
Sample job titles: Director of nursing, occupational therapist, physical therapist, administrators
Location: Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Florida and Missouri

Shared Technologies, Inc.
Industry: Telecommunications
Number of openings: 50
Sample job titles: Sales executive, sr. sales executive, technician
Location: California, Pennsylvania, Florida, Texas, New York, New Jersey, Nevada Arizona, Maryland

Shelter Development, LLC
Industry: Housing/health care
Number of openings: 50
Sample job titles: Property manager, dining services director, clinical, assistant controller, assistant property manager, service technician, senior living program director, staff accountant
Location: Baltimore

Sutter Health
Industry: Health care
Number of openings: 1,700
Sample job titles: RN, nurse managers, directors, physical therapist, occupational therapist, HIM, pharmacist, IT
Location: Northern California region, including Sacramento, Central Valley, Bay Area, Peninsula

Tetra Tech
Industry: Government contractor – engineering
Number of openings: 85
Sample job titles: UXO technicians, field technician, lead UNIX/Linux technician
Location: Nationwide
 

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By Anthony Balderrama, CareerBuilder.com writer

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

10 Tips for Successful Career Plannig

Career planning is not an activity that should be done once in high school or college and then left behind as we move forward in our jobs and careers. Rather, career planning is an activity that is best done on a regular basis especially given the data that the average worker will change careers (not jobs) multiple times over his or her lifetime. And it’s never too soon or too late to start your career planning.

Career planning is not a hard activity, not something to be dreaded or put off, but rather an activity that should be liberating and fulfilling, providing goals to achieve in your current career or plans for beginning a transition to a new career. Career planning should be a rewarding and positive experience.

Here, then, are 10 tips to help you achieve successful career planning.

1. Make Career Planning an Annual Event
Many of us have physicals, visit the eye doctor and dentist, and do a myriad of other things on an annual basis, so why not career planning? Find a day or weekend once a year more often if you feel the need or if you’re planning a major career change and schedule a retreat for yourself. Try to block out all distractions so that you have the time to truly focus on your career what you really want out of your career, out of your life.

By making career planning an annual event, you will feel more secure in your career choice and direction and you’ll be better prepared for the many uncertainties and difficulties that lie ahead in all of our jobs and career.

2. Map Your Path Since Last Career Planning
One of your first activities whenever you take on career planning is spending time mapping out your job and career path since the last time you did any sort of career planning. While you should not dwell on your past, taking the time to review and reflect on the path whether straight and narrow or one filled with any curves and dead-ends will help you plan for the future.

Once you’ve mapped your past, take the time to reflect on your course and note why it looks the way it does. Are you happy with your path? Could you have done things better? What might you have done differently? What can you do differently in the future?

3. Reflect on Your Likes and Dislikes, Needs and Wants
Change is a factor of life; everybody changes, as do our likes and dislikes. Something we loved doing two years ago may now give us displeasure. So always take time to reflect on the things in your life not just in your job that you feel most strongly about.

Make a two-column list of your major likes and dislikes. Then use this list to examine your current job and career path. If your job and career still fall mostly in the like column, then you know you are still on the right path; however, if your job activities fall mostly in the dislike column, now is the time to begin examining new jobs and new careers.

Finally, take the time to really think about what it is you want or need from your work, from your career. Are you looking to make a difference in the world? To be famous? To become financially independent? To effect change? Take the time to understand the motives that drive your sense of success and happiness.

4. Examine Your Pastimes and Hobbies
Career planning provides a great time to also examine the activities you like doing when you’re not working. It may sound a bit odd, to examine non-work activities when doing career planning, but it’s not. Many times your hobbies and leisurely pursuits can give you great insight into future career paths.

Think you can’t make a hobby into a career? People do it all the time. The great painter Paul Gauguin was a successful business person who painted on the side. It actually wasn’t until he was encouraged by an artist he admired to continue painting that he finally took a serious look at his hobby and decided he should change careers. He was good at business, but his love was painting.

5. Make Note of Your Past Accomplishments
Most people don’t keep a very good record of work accomplishments and then struggle with creating a powerful resume when it’s time to search for a new job. Making note of your past accomplishments keeping a record of them is not only useful for building your resume, it’s also useful for career planning.

Sometimes reviewing your past accomplishments will reveal forgotten successes, one or more which may trigger researching and planning a career shift so that you can be in a job that allows you to accomplish the types of things that make you most happy and proud.

6. Look Beyond Your Current Job for Transferable Skills
Some workers get so wrapped up in their job titles that they don’t see any other career possibilities for themselves. Every job requires a certain set of skills, and it’s much better to categorize yourself in terms of these skill sets than be so myopic as to focus just on job titles.

For example, one job-seeker who was trying to accomplish career planning found herself stuck because she identified herself as a reporter. But once she looked beyond her job title, she could see that she had this strong collection of transferable skills such as writing, editing, researching, investigating, interviewing, juggling multiple tasks, meeting goals and deadlines, and managing time and information skills that could easily be applied to a wide variety of jobs in many different careers.

7. Review Career and Job Trends
Everyone makes his or her own job and career opportunities, so that even if your career is shrinking, if you have excellent skills and know how to market yourself, you should be able to find a new job. However, having information about career trends is vital to long-term career planning success.

A career path that is expanding today could easily shrink tomorrow or next year. It’s important to see where job growth is expected, especially in the career fields that most interest you. Besides knowledge of these trends, the other advantage of conducting this research is the power it gives you to adjust and strengthen your position, your unique selling proposition. One of the keys to job and career success is having a unique set of accomplishments, skills, and education that make you better than all others in your career.

8. Set Career and Job Goals
Develop a roadmap for your job and career success. Can you be successful in your career without setting goals? Of course. Can you be even more successful through goal-setting? Most research says yes.

A major component of career planning is setting short-term (in the coming year) and long-term (beyond a year) career and job goals. Once you initiate this process, another component of career planning becomes reviewing and adjusting those goals as your career plans progress or change – and developing new goals once you accomplish your previous goals.

9. Explore New Education/Training Opportunities
It’s somewhat of a cliche, but information really does lead to power and success. Never pass up chances to learn and grow more as a person and as a worker; part of career planning is going beyond passive acceptance of training opportunities to finding new ones that will help enhance or further your career.

Take the time to contemplate what types of educational experiences will help you achieve your career goals. Look within your company, your professional association, your local universities and community colleges, as well as online distance learning programs, to find potential career-enhancing opportunities and then find a way achieve them.

10. Research Further Career/Job Advancement Opportunities
One of the really fun outcomes of career planning is picturing yourself in the future. Where will you be in a year? In five years? A key component to developing multiple scenarios of that future is researching career paths.

Of course, if you’re in what you consider a dead-end job, this activity becomes even more essential to you, but all job-seekers should take the time to research various career paths and then develop scenarios for seeing one or more of these visions become reality. Look within your current employer and current career field, but again, as with all aspects of career planning, do not be afraid to look beyond to other possible careers.

Final Thoughts on Career Planning
Don’t wait too long between career planning sessions. Career planning can have multiple benefits, from goal-setting to career change, to a more successful life. Once you begin regularly reviewing and planning your career using the tips provided in this article, you’ll find yourself better prepared for whatever lies ahead in your career and in your life.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

10 Tips for Successful Career Plannig

Career planning is not an activity that should be done once in high school or college and then left behind as we move forward in our jobs and careers. Rather, career planning is an activity that is best done on a regular basis especially given the data that the average worker will change careers (not jobs) multiple times over his or her lifetime. And it’s never too soon or too late to start your career planning.

Career planning is not a hard activity, not something to be dreaded or put off, but rather an activity that should be liberating and fulfilling, providing goals to achieve in your current career or plans for beginning a transition to a new career. Career planning should be a rewarding and positive experience.

Here, then, are 10 tips to help you achieve successful career planning.

1. Make Career Planning an Annual Event
Many of us have physicals, visit the eye doctor and dentist, and do a myriad of other things on an annual basis, so why not career planning? Find a day or weekend once a year more often if you feel the need or if you’re planning a major career change and schedule a retreat for yourself. Try to block out all distractions so that you have the time to truly focus on your career what you really want out of your career, out of your life.

By making career planning an annual event, you will feel more secure in your career choice and direction and you’ll be better prepared for the many uncertainties and difficulties that lie ahead in all of our jobs and career.

2. Map Your Path Since Last Career Planning
One of your first activities whenever you take on career planning is spending time mapping out your job and career path since the last time you did any sort of career planning. While you should not dwell on your past, taking the time to review and reflect on the path whether straight and narrow or one filled with any curves and dead-ends will help you plan for the future.

Once you’ve mapped your past, take the time to reflect on your course and note why it looks the way it does. Are you happy with your path? Could you have done things better? What might you have done differently? What can you do differently in the future?

3. Reflect on Your Likes and Dislikes, Needs and Wants
Change is a factor of life; everybody changes, as do our likes and dislikes. Something we loved doing two years ago may now give us displeasure. So always take time to reflect on the things in your life not just in your job that you feel most strongly about.

Make a two-column list of your major likes and dislikes. Then use this list to examine your current job and career path. If your job and career still fall mostly in the like column, then you know you are still on the right path; however, if your job activities fall mostly in the dislike column, now is the time to begin examining new jobs and new careers.

Finally, take the time to really think about what it is you want or need from your work, from your career. Are you looking to make a difference in the world? To be famous? To become financially independent? To effect change? Take the time to understand the motives that drive your sense of success and happiness.

4. Examine Your Pastimes and Hobbies
Career planning provides a great time to also examine the activities you like doing when you’re not working. It may sound a bit odd, to examine non-work activities when doing career planning, but it’s not. Many times your hobbies and leisurely pursuits can give you great insight into future career paths.

Think you can’t make a hobby into a career? People do it all the time. The great painter Paul Gauguin was a successful business person who painted on the side. It actually wasn’t until he was encouraged by an artist he admired to continue painting that he finally took a serious look at his hobby and decided he should change careers. He was good at business, but his love was painting.

5. Make Note of Your Past Accomplishments
Most people don’t keep a very good record of work accomplishments and then struggle with creating a powerful resume when it’s time to search for a new job. Making note of your past accomplishments keeping a record of them is not only useful for building your resume, it’s also useful for career planning.

Sometimes reviewing your past accomplishments will reveal forgotten successes, one or more which may trigger researching and planning a career shift so that you can be in a job that allows you to accomplish the types of things that make you most happy and proud.

6. Look Beyond Your Current Job for Transferable Skills
Some workers get so wrapped up in their job titles that they don’t see any other career possibilities for themselves. Every job requires a certain set of skills, and it’s much better to categorize yourself in terms of these skill sets than be so myopic as to focus just on job titles.

For example, one job-seeker who was trying to accomplish career planning found herself stuck because she identified herself as a reporter. But once she looked beyond her job title, she could see that she had this strong collection of transferable skills such as writing, editing, researching, investigating, interviewing, juggling multiple tasks, meeting goals and deadlines, and managing time and information skills that could easily be applied to a wide variety of jobs in many different careers.

7. Review Career and Job Trends
Everyone makes his or her own job and career opportunities, so that even if your career is shrinking, if you have excellent skills and know how to market yourself, you should be able to find a new job. However, having information about career trends is vital to long-term career planning success.

A career path that is expanding today could easily shrink tomorrow or next year. It’s important to see where job growth is expected, especially in the career fields that most interest you. Besides knowledge of these trends, the other advantage of conducting this research is the power it gives you to adjust and strengthen your position, your unique selling proposition. One of the keys to job and career success is having a unique set of accomplishments, skills, and education that make you better than all others in your career.

8. Set Career and Job Goals
Develop a roadmap for your job and career success. Can you be successful in your career without setting goals? Of course. Can you be even more successful through goal-setting? Most research says yes.

A major component of career planning is setting short-term (in the coming year) and long-term (beyond a year) career and job goals. Once you initiate this process, another component of career planning becomes reviewing and adjusting those goals as your career plans progress or change – and developing new goals once you accomplish your previous goals.

9. Explore New Education/Training Opportunities
It’s somewhat of a cliche, but information really does lead to power and success. Never pass up chances to learn and grow more as a person and as a worker; part of career planning is going beyond passive acceptance of training opportunities to finding new ones that will help enhance or further your career.

Take the time to contemplate what types of educational experiences will help you achieve your career goals. Look within your company, your professional association, your local universities and community colleges, as well as online distance learning programs, to find potential career-enhancing opportunities and then find a way achieve them.

10. Research Further Career/Job Advancement Opportunities
One of the really fun outcomes of career planning is picturing yourself in the future. Where will you be in a year? In five years? A key component to developing multiple scenarios of that future is researching career paths.

Of course, if you’re in what you consider a dead-end job, this activity becomes even more essential to you, but all job-seekers should take the time to research various career paths and then develop scenarios for seeing one or more of these visions become reality. Look within your current employer and current career field, but again, as with all aspects of career planning, do not be afraid to look beyond to other possible careers.

Final Thoughts on Career Planning
Don’t wait too long between career planning sessions. Career planning can have multiple benefits, from goal-setting to career change, to a more successful life. Once you begin regularly reviewing and planning your career using the tips provided in this article, you’ll find yourself better prepared for whatever lies ahead in your career and in your life.

by Randall S. Hansen, Ph.D.

You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

The Most Quality and Real Engineering Jobs – Anywhere in the world (Specially in USA)

Engineering Crossing has vastly more engineering job openings than any other job board because they actually go out and research jobs instead of just posting jobs employers pay them to post. New Engineering Jobs This Week = 41,428.
Only Engineering Crossing researches and consolidates every engineering job opening it can find and puts all of the job openings it locates in one place.
The engineer jobs are found in many fields. The engineer jobs are found in fields like the construction, chemical, structural, electrical, computer, IT and many more. The engineering careers are very rewarding. There is lucrative growth and earning in the engineering careers.
For detail of all New Engineering Jobs visit Engineering Crossing
 
Want to become an Computer Hardware Expert then visit http://www.computertipsntricks.com/hardware.htm or visit <http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/>

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