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Archive for the ‘Women’s Career’ Category

10 Surprising Jobs Where Women Are Taking Over

Forbes recently published their list of 20 Surprising Jobs Women Are Taking Over. As they point out, while women have historically been most concentrated in service jobs such as those in the fields of education, social work, and customer service, more women these days are going into professional occupations and management positions.

These positions usually require at least a college degree, and as women in the United States continue to make greater educational strides, the gender-pay gap continues to shrink. In fact, according to the U.S. Department of Education, women are currently outpacing men when it comes to earning bachelor’s degrees at a rate of 3 to 2.
Additionally, as large corporations continue to develop innovative policies geared toward working parents, more women will continue to apply for, and eventually work for these organizations.
All these trends seem to be converging to reshape the country’s work landscape. The Forbes article points out 20 occupations, which have been traditionally dominated by men, where women now make up more than 50 percent of the work force.
Here are the top 10 jobs where women are taking over:

10. Budget Analysts
What they make: $56,890*
What they do: Budget analysts help organizations allocate their financial resources. They develop, analyze, and execute budgets, as well as estimate future financial needs for private businesses, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies.
Job outlook: Budget analyst jobs are expected to increase faster than average. Candidates with a master’s degree are expected to have the best opportunities. **


9. Human Resources Managers
What they make: $59,369*
What they do: Every organization wants to attract, motivate, and retain the most qualified employees and match them to jobs for which they are best suited. Human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists provide this connection.
Job outlook: Employment is expected to grow much faster than the average for all human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists occupations. College graduates and those who have earned certification should have the best job opportunities. **


8. Veterinarians
What they make: $72,234*
What they do: Veterinarians diagnose and treat diseases and dysfunctions of animals. Specifically, they care for the health of pets, livestock, and animals in zoos, racetracks, and laboratories. Some veterinarians use their skills to protect humans against diseases carried by animals and conduct clinical research on human and animal health problems.
Job outlook: Employment is expected to grow much faster than the average for all human resources, training, and labor relations managers and specialists occupations. College graduates and those who have earned certification should have the best job opportunities. **


7. Tax Examiners, Collectors and Revenue Agents
What they make: $44,996*
What they do: Taxes are one of the certainties of life, and as long as governments collect taxes, there will be jobs for tax examiners, collectors, and revenue agents. By reviewing tax returns, conducting audits, identifying taxes payable, and collecting overdue tax dollars, these workers ensure that governments obtain revenues from businesses and citizens.
Job outlook: Employment is expected to grow as fast as the average, while retirements over the next 10 years should create additional job openings at all levels of government. **


6. Educational Administrators
What they make: $41,894*
What they do: Successful operation of an educational institution requires competent administrators. Education administrators provide instructional leadership and manage the day-to-day activities in schools, preschools, day care centers, and colleges and universities.
Job outlook: Employment is projected to grow about as fast as the average for all occupations. Job opportunities should be excellent due to a large number of expected retirements and fewer applicants for some positions.**


5. Medical Scientists
What they make: $84,937*
What they do: Biological scientists study living organisms and their relationship to the environment. They perform research to gain a better understanding of fundamental life processes and apply that understanding to developing new products or processes.
Job outlook: Employment of biological scientists is expected to increase much faster than the average for all occupations although there will continue to be competition for some basic research positions.**


4. Insurance Underwriters
What they make: $49,430*
What they do: Underwriters decide whether insurance is provided and, if so, under what terms. They identify and calculate the risk of loss from policyholders, establish who receives a policy, determine the appropriate premium, and write policies that cover this risk.
Job outlook: Although employment is expected to decline slowly, job prospects will remain good because of high turnover. **


3. Financial Managers
What they make: $65,521*
What they do: Financial managers oversee the preparation of financial reports, direct investment activities, and implement cash management strategies. Managers also develop strategies and implement the long-term goals of their organization.
Job outlook: Employment growth for financial managers is expected is to be as fast as the average for all occupations. However, applicants will likely face keen competition for jobs. Those with a master’s degree and certification will have the best opportunities.**


2. Meeting and Convention Planners
What they make: $47,964*
What they do: Meetings and conventions bring people together for a common purpose, and meeting and convention planners work to ensure that this purpose is achieved seamlessly.
Job outlook: Employment of meeting and convention planners is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations. Opportunities will be best for individuals with a bachelor’s degree and some meeting planning experience.**


1. Accountants and Auditors
What they make: $89,706*
What they do: Accountants and auditors help to ensure that firms are run efficiently, public records kept accurately, and taxes paid properly and on time.
Job outlook: Accountants and auditors are expected to experience much faster than average employment growth from 2008-18. Job opportunities should be favorable; accountants and auditors who have a professional certification, especially CPAs, should have the best prospects.**

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By AOL Jobs Contributor 

"100 Best" companies for women

Five D.C. companies were among 100 who are being highlighted by Working Mother magazine for maintaining workplaces that allow women to keep balance between their work and home lives. For the 25th year, the list of “Working Mother Best 100” companies spotlights companies that “set a new standard for family-friendly policies.” The local companies include:
  • Arnold & Porter
  • Covington & Burling
  • Fannie Mae
  • FINRA
  • National Education Association
Congratulations to them and to their very fortunate employees. The news release below, e-mailed to me by Ila Tyagi of The Rosen Group, a publicist for the magazine, explains the list and why the magazine chose to celebrate such companies.
Print out and show this post to your boss, give or her a hard look and then say something like, “How nice it must be to work for a company with such progressive, enlightened leadership. How wonderful that must be for the employees and the bottom line!”

New York, NY (September 14, 2010) — Celebrating its silver anniversary this year, the Working Mother 100 Best Companies initiative has set the bar for forward-thinking, family-friendly workplace policies for a quarter-century. Today, the Working Mother 100 Best Companies offer better benefits than ever before, eclipsing their counterparts nationwide. With 70 percent of mothers working and women outnumbering men in the workplace for the first time in U.S. history working moms have come a long way.

“Twenty-five years ago, we made a bold decision to launch our Best Companies initiative and challenge businesses to address the unique needs of working mothers,” said Carol Evans, President, Working Mother Media. “The immense influx of women into the workforce demanded changes in workplace culture as companies strove to keep working moms’ talent and loyalty. Today, we celebrate our winners’ untiring commitment to their employees through an impressive array of programs.”

While the Working Mother 100 Best Companies continue expanding their benefits, those at companies nationwide° lag. Just 44 percent of American companies offer telecommuting (vs. 100 percent of the 100 Best), 17 percent offer formal mentoring (vs. 95 percent), and 37 percent offer health insurance for part-timers (vs. 100 percent). 49 percent of employers offered flextime last year, down from 54 percent the prior year. In contrast, all of the 100 Best Companies offer paid maternity leave, lactation rooms, flextime, mental health consultations and elder-care resources; and 98 percent offer health screening and wellness programs–particularly significant in a stress-inducing, poor economy.

Improvements in these companies’ offerings to working-family employees include:
THEN: Six weeks of partially-paid maternity leave
NOW: Six to 14 weeks at full pay, with pre-maternity leaves and new-mom phase-back
THEN: Four percent of Best Companies offered paternity leave
NOW: 75 percent of Best Companies offer paternity leave
THEN: Seven Best Companies offered on-site childcare
NOW: 99 Best Companies offer a range of services including backup child-care, sick childcare, before- and after-school care and summer camps for kids
THEN: Stress reduction programs
NOW: Fully-staffed medical centers at 63 percent, fitness centers at 78 percent and exercise classes at 80 percent of Best Companies
“There’s been a dramatic change in America’s mindset,” said Suzanne Riss, Editor in Chief, Working Mother. “In 1986, women didn’t acknowledge the fact that they were a mom at work for fear of being ‘mommy tracked.’ Today, moms have photos of their kids on their desks because companies recognize that moms make high-achieving, loyal and ambitious employees. What’s more, other employee groups – including dads and people with aging parents – have benefited from the policies promoted by the 100 Best.”
The Working Mother 100 Best Companies employ dynamic programs that adeptly help employees in all areas of their lives. Employees who want to learn how to build a nest egg in a cracked economy can benefit from Prudential Financial’s one-on-one budget coaching. Intel supplies employees and their children and grandchildren with homework help via a tutoring hotline. And employees at Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey work with a former stand-up comedian to learn how humor can reduce stress, as part of a five-year program focused on education, exercise and overall well-being.
Profiles of the 100 Best Companies, as well as national comparisons, are in the October issue of 
Working Mother and at workingmother.com/bestcompanies.
THE 2010 WORKING MOTHER 100 BEST COMPANIES
*Indicates a Top 10 winning company
־ Indicates a company on the list for all 25 years
  • Abbott
  • Accenture
  • Allstate Insurance Company
  • American Electric Power
  • American Express Company
  • AOL
  • Arnold & Porter LLP
  • AstraZeneca
  • Automatic Data Processing, Inc.
  • Bain & Company, Inc.
  • Bank of America*
  • Baptist Health South Florida
  • Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina
  • Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceutical USA
  • Bon Secours Richmond Health System
  • Booz Allen Hamilton
  • The Boston Consulting Group, Inc.
  • Bristol-Myers Squibb
  • Bronson Healthcare Group, Inc.
  • Capital One Financial Corporation
  • Carlson Companies
  • Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
  • Cisco
  • Citi
  • Colgate-Palmolive Company
  • Covington & Burling LLP
  • Credit Suisse
  • Dell Inc.
  • Deloitte*
  • Deutsche Bank
  • Diageo North America
  • Discovery Communications*
  • Dow Corning Corporation
  • DuPont
  • Eli Lilly and Company
  • Ernst & Young*
  • Fannie Mae
  • FINRA
  • First Horizon National Corporation
  • First National Bank
  • Freddie Mac
  • Genentech
  • General Electric Company
  • General Mills*
  • Goldman, Sachs & Co.
  • Grant Thornton LLP
  • Hallmark Cards, Inc.
  • HCA Virginia Health System – Richmond Market
  • Hewitt Associates LLC
  • Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey
  • HP
  • IBM Corporation* ־
  • Intel
  • Johnson & Johnson ־
  • Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP
  • Kellogg Company
  • KPMG LLP*
  • Kraft Foods, Inc.
  • LEGO Systems, Inc.
  • March of Dimes Foundation
  • Marriott International, Inc.
  • MasterCard Worldwide
  • McGladrey
  • The McGraw-Hill Companies
  • McKinsey & Company
  • Merck & Co., Inc.
  • Mercy Health System
  • MetLife, Inc.
  • Microsoft Corporation
  • Moffitt Cancer Center
  • Monsanto Company
  • Morgan Stanley
  • National Education Association
  • New York Life Insurance Company
  • Northern Trust Corporation
  • Northwestern Memorial HealthCare
  • Novo Nordisk Inc.
  • Patagonia, Inc.
  • Pearson Inc.
  • Pfizer Inc.
  • Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP
  • The PNC Financial Services Group
  • PricewaterhouseCoopers*
  • The Principal Financial Group
  • Procter & Gamble
  • Prudential Financial, Inc.
  • sanofi-aventis U.S.
  • SC Johnson
  • Scripps Health
  • Texas Instruments Incorporated
  • TriHealth, A Partnership of Bethesda and Good Samaritan
  • Turner Broadcasting System, Inc.
  • University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics*
  • VCU Health System
  • Verizon Communications Inc.
  • WellPoint, Inc.
  • WellStar Health System*
  • Wyndham Worldwide
  • Yale University
  • Yale-New Haven Hospital
_______________________
By Avis Thomas-Lester  for the Washington Post
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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Working moms redefining success

The traditional model of professional success in corporate America has been based on a “Company Man” archetype popularized in the 1950s, which mainly referred to a white, male, corporate climber with a wife at home.

Fast forward to 2010. Women now make up 51 percent of the total U.S. workforce. Last year, the number of working moms as sole family breadwinners hit a record high. As a result, many working moms are starting to think this outdated career template needs an overhaul.

Lisa Depew, 34, was an application engineer for Intel Corp. when her first son arrived in 2005. She took five months off to be with her son, thanks to family leave and an earned sabbatical, and then proposed working a part-time schedule. She later had another child, and as her kids got older, she requested a three-and-a-half-day schedule and eventually moved to a 40-hour week with Mondays working at home. She is now the technical lead for tools and technologies services in the sales and marketing group at Intel, based in Santa Clara, Calif.

“Could my career have advanced faster? Probably,” said Depew. “But would I have changed anything? No.”
A growing number of working women are defining success on their own terms. While their career trajectories seem atypical, and they’ve made job decisions based on their family something which would have doomed most corporate climbers in the past it works for them.

Tricia Kagerer, 45, negotiated with a Dallas-based construction company to work flexible hours so she could pick up and drop off her kids at day care and school. She is now the vice president of risk management for the firm, C.F. Jordan Construction.

“When they offered me the job, I was clear that my kids come first,” said Kagerer, whose kids are 11 and 14.

Beyond ‘Leave It to Beaver’
Not all working moms are as lucky.

“There’s still a whole class of women that don’t have the luxury of thinking about redefining success. They are working to put food on table,” said Rosalind Hudnell, Intel’s director of Global Diversity & Inclusion.

But, she added, the structure of work is slowly changing because of the influx of women into the workforce and will eventually impact women and men from all socioeconomic levels.

“People are realizing that ‘Leave It to Beaver’ isn’t how everyone is going to live their lives,” she said.

Many new mothers are better educated than they were two decades ago and are increasingly having children at a later age. Today, one in seven babies is born to a mother at least 35 years old.  

Marianne DelPo Kulow, a mother of two, said she had her first child at 40 and a second at 42. She decided to leave a career as a high-powered attorney for something more conducive to raising a family, so she went into academia. She is now a law professor and director of the Women’s Leadership Institute at Bentley University in Waltham, Mass.

“How do you define success?” asked Kulow, 49. “Within the profession I’ve chosen, I made it. I’m respected by my peers, at the top of my salary scale and I’m able to pick my kids up at 3.”

New research suggests that the majority of women in the U.S. are satisfied with both their professional and personal accomplishments. A survey by Kenexa Research Institute looked at whether women thought their futures looked promising, and 62 percent said: “I can meet my career goals and still devote sufficient attention to my family/personal life.” That compares to 59 percent among men who feel that way.

For women in the U.S., “having a fulfilled or satisfied personal life is an aspect of achieving a promising future at an organization,” said Brenda Kowske, research manager and at Kenexa

Today, women are in a keen position to reshape the linear career ladder upward. But one big question remains:

“Are we being pioneers or simply giving in?” asked Pamela Stone, associate professor of sociology at Hunter College and author of “Opting Out: Why Women Really Quit Careers and Head Home.”

If women are just changing their idea of success because they’ve given up fighting a society that deprives working moms of opportunities to advance, then it’s not a good thing, said Stone. However, if working moms are essentially transforming the work dynamic to meet their needs, she said, then that’s progress.

Clearly women have a long way to go when it comes to getting the top seats at U.S. corporations, with women holding only 13.5 percent of the executive officer positions, according to Catalyst. And women still make 77 cents on the dollar to men.

It’s been hotly debated whether this is about bias against women, or their decisions to cut back hours or opt out, or about a system that just hasn’t adapted to the needs of working parents. The U.S. is one of the only industrialized nations without mandatory paid family leave, and good child care options are few and far between.

Changes in the workplace
But the growing power of working moms may alter the landscape once and for all.

“When you get a critical mass of women in any professions, you do get changes,” said William Doherty, professor and director of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program in the department of family social science at the University of Minnesota.

“Women are reshaping the workforce, and I think a cultural change is underway,” he added, pointing to the health care industry. “You have 50 percent or more of the young doctors today are women, and as a result there is much more part-time work available. You don’t have the expectation of 90-hour weeks anymore.”

Rewriting the rules, however, has not been easy.

“We have no clue what it’s going to be like when we become a working mother,” said Susan Wenner Jackson, one of the founders of the website Working Moms Against Guilt, because few women do any pre-planning. “It completely blows your mind and you have to put the pieces back together.”

Many working moms suddenly find themselves making sacrifices, whether at home or in their jobs. But such sacrifices don’t equate to career failures in their eyes.

Kelly McCarthy, an attorney with Sideman & Bancroft in San Francisco and mother to a 1-year old son named Finn, believes she has a successful and fulfilling career.

“I have made it work with a perfect storm of luck, circumstance and planning,” she said.

McCarthy and her husband approach parenting as a partnership, sharing child care and household duties. She chose to work for a smaller law firm that’s more accommodating to her needs instead of a big firm. 
McCarthy and her husband also live in a town near family that can help out.

And take Julie Rocco, 38, and Julie Levine, 40. They were both established engineers and managers at Ford Motor Company before they became moms. Together, they broached the idea of doing a job-share arrangement even though it wasn’t common at their level.

The Julies, as they’re known at Ford, share all job tasks and share all information about their job, which is overseeing the Ford Explorer product program. They have conference calls every night to keep up to date, and both work in the office on Wednesdays so they can connect with each other and their team.

“This is not a free ride. We work very hard,” said Rocco. And Levine added, “We’re both aspiring women who want to keep moving up.”

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By Eve Tahmincioglu for msnbc.com

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

The Best Part-Time Jobs for Full-Time Moms

You need to start bringing home a little extra bacon for your family, but you also need to be available when your kids wake from their nap or get home from school. Not to worry. You don’t have to sign up for the overnight night shift to work around your kids’ schedule. Herewith, eight part-time jobs that pay well and offer a flexible schedule.
1. Call center representative
“These jobs can be ideal for moms,” says Christine Durst, co-author with Michael Haaren of “Work at Home Now: The No-Nonsense Guide to Finding Your Perfect Home-Based Job, Avoiding Scams, and Making a Great Living.” Many customer service positions can be done from home, during the shift of your choosing, Durst says. These jobs often require your own computer, a quiet workspace, and a background check, she adds. For a list of 86 legitimate companies that use home-based call center workers, see Durst and Haaren’s site RatRaceRebellion.com. Some jobs may require a getting a business license or other preparations so do your research carefully.
Median hourly wage: $12.89 plus bonus.
2. Interpreter or translator
Bilingual? Why not get paid for your language skills? “For medical and legal interpreting, you’d get a certification,” says Dr. Laurence Shatkin, author of more than 20 books for job hunters, including “300 Best Jobs Without a Four-Year Degree.” While interpreters work verbally in a place of business, translators work with written documents, often from home, on their own time, and against a deadline, says Shatkin.
Median hourly wage: $18.21 plus bonus.
3. Retail sales associate
“Most salespeople have flexible schedules,” though evening and weekend work is often part of the package, Durst says. “The mom who’s already doing Pampered Chef or Mary Kay can parlay those marketing skills into a more traditional job like this.” Despite the hits that retailers have taken during the recession, “There’s always a lot of turnover, which means there are still a lot of job openings,” Shatkin adds.
Median hourly wage: $9.45 plus bonus.
4. Fitness instructor
Are you an aerobics buff? Then why not move to the head of the exercise class? Many YMCA and health club fitness instructors are self-taught, says Shatkin. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), an audition is often all that’s required to apply, though employers may request certification once you’re on the job. Job prospects are plentiful and the hours are flexible — to a point, says Shatkin. “You’re needed evenings and weekends when people are available to take the classes,” he explains.
Median hourly wage: $17.39 plus bonus.
5. Medical transcriptionist
“With the wave of aging baby boomers, there’s a huge medical need coming up,” says Durst, who recommends visiting the site mtjobs.com for industry job listings. According to the BLS, about 70 percent of medical transcriptionists work for hospitals or physicians’ offices, with many telecommuting from home. To learn the necessary terminology, software, and hardware, a certification program is a must, says Shatkin.
Median hourly wage: $14.35 plus bonus.
6. Cosmetologist
As the BLS reports, many hair, makeup, and beauty professionals have flexible hours. What’s more, “About half of them are self-employed,” says Shatkin. You’ll need a license to work in cosmetology, with requirements varying by state, Shatkin advises. The website Beauty Schools Directory says that on average, a full cosmetology program involves 1,400 to 1,600 hours of training. (For details, see this list of state board licensing agencies.)
Median hourly wage: $9.55 plus tips and bonus.
7. Tutor
If you excel in math, science, or a second language and like working with kids, tutoring may be for you. “The formal requirements are just about nil,” Shatkin says. What’s more, he says, most tutors are self-employed and enjoy flexible schedules. Companies like Kaplan often hire tutors to help teens prepare for their SATs, Shatkin suggests. In addition, Durst says, companies like Idapted hire those with teaching experience to teach English to overseas students — simply by conversing with them online.
Median hourly wage: $16.05 plus bonus.
8. Bus driver
About a third of public transit and school bus drivers work part time, Shatkin says. And according to the BLS, split shifts are common. Job requirements include a clean driving record, a commercial driver’s license, and several weeks of on-the-job training, Shatkin cautions. On the plus side, he says, “It’s more recession proof than a lot of jobs. Even if the teachers get laid off, the kids still have to ride to school.”
Median hourly wage: $13.74 plus bonus (school bus driver); $15.77 plus bonus (transit and intercity bus driver).

By PayScale for AOL.com

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If you are serious about your professional career and want to pass your IT Certification exam in first attempt and don’t want to waste your precious time and money then visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

Six Subtle Moves That Hold Women Back From Success

Hello Friends,
It’s not that women are supposed to act, dress and sound like men to get ahead in the workplace, but there are a number of gestures women commonly use that denote vulnerability and fragility, rather than power and authority. In a blog called “7 Behaviors that Keep Women from Getting Ahead,” Dan Erwin cites an article by Mary Ellen Drummond many years ago, which still applies to many women today.
I know I’m guilty of several, and have been advised by managers and producers to “cut that out if you ever want to go anywhere.” Check out these half-dozen behaviors that prevent you from “looking like you mean it.”
1. Nodding your head a lot when listening. Women often nod their heads to encourage the speaker to go on, but this connotes approval and agreement when often none is intended or required, and you can end up looking like a bobble-head doll. Men usually nod their heads only to show agreement, or to indicate that they are about to make a point. Constant head nodding can express encouragement, but not authority.
2. Not taking up enough physical space. By this we mean stand firm and tall, shoulders out, head up. When sitting at a table or desk, spread out your papers, you laptop, your pad and pens. Let everyone know you’re there don’t try to blend in. By receding or folding in, it looks as if you’re trying not to inconvenience anyone. Take ownership of as much space as possible; that sends a powerful message.
3. “Uptalking.” Women’s voices often rise at the ends of sentences as if they’re asking a question even when making a statement. For example: “On that report I completed? It says that viral marketing is more effective?” It implies you’re asking for approval, rather than stating a fact. Most women are not aware that they do this, and it’s a particular habit with the young students and the freshly graduated. Speak with authority and periods, not with tentativeness and question marks.
4. Fidgeting. Are you constantly adjusting your clothing, hair, jewelry, purse, cell phone, etc.? Although the study was done several years ago, Drummond cites that when women enter a room, they make 27 movements. Men make 12. When you appear calm and contained, you appear powerful. Fidgeting implies nervousness.
5. Tilting your head. Women often tilt their heads when they talk. They think that directing an ear toward someone says that they are listening. Instead, it appears as if you’re distracted or trying to deflect the message. If looking directly into someone’s eyes is disconcerting, look just below their eyes at their cheeks or nose. But look directly at them and don’t tilt your head. This, again, is something most women don’t even realize they’re doing; but if they watch videos of themselves, they’ll note it happening.
6. Introducing yourself too quickly. It’s common for a woman to say, “Hi, I’m Jane Smith,” right off the bat. But studies have shown that people seldom remember anything that’s said in the first 5-7 seconds because they’re too busy checking each other out, and visually processing whoever is in front of them. When meeting someone new, wait a few seconds before introducing yourself. Instead make a comment about the environment, event, etc. first, then introduce yourself.

The good news is that most of these bad behaviors are learned, so they can also be unlearned. You might want to ask a family member, friend or co-worker to bring it to your attention when some of these negative nuances creep in. They might drive you nuts at first but you’ll thank them for it later, when colleagues start showing a renewed respect.
By Lisa Johnson Mandell for AOL.com
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You should be well equipped with these most in-demand I.T Certifications/Exams, Before searching any job, Visit http://www.ComputerTipsnTricks.com/ITcert.htm for Free Practice Exams, Free Study Material / Books etc.

25 best-paying jobs for women

When you look at Forbes magazine’s most recent list of highest-paid CEO’s (chief executives of the 500 biggest companies in the United States), you won’t see a woman until No. 48: Irene B Rosenfeld, CEO of Kraft Foods. In a country where women make up 47 percent of the workforce, 3 percent of Fortune 500 CEO’s are female. In addition, women who worked full time earned an average of just 80 percent of what men earned in the same positions in 2008, according to the BLS.
But is salary disparity between genders the issue or is it something else?
In the Harvard Business Review blog, Avivah Wittenberg-Cox wrote: “Women represent one of the world’s biggest and most under-reported opportunities. The business world has been so focused on stories like the rise of China that it has not been invited to see that, much closer to home, business could be reaping the benefits of the rise of women. Companies and their business school feeders have been slow in adapting and profiting from this shift, and part of the reason is that media too often focus on small, sensational and misleading parts of the story, including aspects like the wage gap.”
Catalyst’s February 2010 Pipeline’s Broken Promise report examining high potential graduates from top business schools around the world found that, even after taking into account experience, industry and region, women start at lower levels than men, make on average $4,600 less in their initial jobs, and continue to be outpaced by men in rank and salary growth. Only when women begin their post-MBA career at mid-management or above do they achieve parity in position with men – a situation that accounted for only 10 percent of the women and 19 percent of the men surveyed.
Whatever the cause, the BLS reports there are only a handful of occupations where women’s earnings are equal to or exceed men’s including construction and extraction occupations; special education teachers; installation, maintenance and repair occupations; life, physical and social science technicians; and counselors.
We wanted to know, what jobs pay women the most money? Here are 25 jobs where women earn $1000 a week or more, according to the BLS, and how those wages compare to their male counterparts’.

Pharmacists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,647
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,914
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.1%
Chief executives
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,603
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,999
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 80.2%
Lawyers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,509
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,875
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 80.5%
Computer software engineers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,351
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,555
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.9%
Computer and information systems managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,260
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,641
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 76.8%
Physicians and surgeons
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,230
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,911
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 64.4%
Management analysts
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,139
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,391
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 81.9%
Human resources managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,137
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,433
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 79.3%

Speech-language pathologists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,124
Men – Median weekly earnings: *
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **
Computer and mathematical occupations
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,088
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,320
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 82.4%
Computer scientists and systems analysts
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,082
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,240
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 87.3%
Physician assistants
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,077
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **
Medical and health services managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,066
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,504
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 70.9%
Physical scientists, all other
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,061
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,535
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 69.1%
Postsecondary teachers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,056
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,245
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 84.8%
Marketing and sales managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,024
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,601
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 64%
Physical therapists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,019
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,329
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 76.7%
Occupational therapists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,016
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **
Registered nurses
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,011
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,168
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 86.6%
Managers, all other
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,010
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,359
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 74.3%
Psychologists
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,004
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **
Computer programmers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,003
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,261
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 79.5%
Architecture and engineering occupations
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,001
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,286
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 77.8%
Advertising and promotions managers
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,000
Men – Median weekly earnings: **
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: **
Education administrators
Women – Median weekly earnings: $1,000
Men – Median weekly earnings: $1,398
Women’s earnings as percent of men’s in same occupation: 71.5%
What do you think? Do you agree or disagree? Are males and females paid the same at your organization?
*No data or data that do not meet publication criteria.
** Data not shown where the male employment base is less than 50,000.
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A Collection of the Best Career Networking and Professional Organizations / Associations for WOMEN.

Women’s Career Networking and Professional Associations with all details like mailing addresses, phone nos. emails and direct links to their web sites. This is a special gift working women. Detail is given below:

Networking organizations:
Advancing Women — This International Network for Women in the Workplace highlights issues for the working woman. Includes an online career center, Today’s Women’s News feature, forums for discussion, links for networking with international women, personal services resources and links to similar sites. E-mail:
publisher@advancingwomen.com

BellaOnline — Online resource for women that has career and networking advice, as well as chat areas and discussion forums for online networking.

DinnerGrrls.org — a great networking and mentoring site for women, from all over the world. Includes both online resources and network, as well as local chapters in some U.S. cities. For all women, from college student to CEO. Free to job-seekers.

iVillage.com — Another online women’s resource with career and networking advice, and chat areas and message boards for online networking.

Business Women’s Network (BWN) — Is dedicated to the promotion of business and professional women by providing assistance to corporations, businesswomen’s organizations and state and federal agencies. BWN strives to be the authority on issues affecting businesswomen and the growth of women-owned businesses. Offers searchable online business women’s network directory.

Women’s Professional Organizations:
Selected women’s professional organizations are provided here. To locate professional organizations specifically for women, use the Gateway to Associations Online search engine. This search engine has a pull-down menu that enables you to select “women” as one of the search criteria.

American Association of University Women (AAUW)
1111 16th St., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-7700
E-mail: info@aauw.org
A national organization that promotes education and equity for all women and girls.

American Business Women’s Association (ABWA)
9100 Ward Pkwy.
Kansas City, MO 64114-0728
Phone: 816-361-6621
E-mail: abwa@abwa.org
Call the ABWA’s national headquarters for local contacts.

American Medical Women’s Association
Suite 400, 801 N. Fairfax St.
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-838-0500
E-mail: info@amwa-doc.org
Serves female health professionals.

American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants (AWSCPA)
401 N. Michigan Avenue
Chicago, Illinois 60611
Phone: 312-664-6610, 800-AWSCPA-1
FAX: 312-527-6783
E-mail: admin@awscpa.org
The American Woman’s Society of Certified Public Accountants is the devoted exclusively to the support and professional development of women CPAs. The society also addresses gender equity, the glass ceiling, work and family issues. To accomplish its mission, AWSCPA offers in-depth support in six important areas, including networking. AWSCPAís Web site has information about meetings and conferences as well as current job opportunities. Some areas of the site are open to members only.

Association for Women in Communications
3337 Duke Street
Alexandria, VA 22314
Phone: 703-370-7436
Fax: 703-370-7437
E-mail: info@womcom.org
Offers a mentor program and an annual career day.

Association for Women in Computing
Suite 1006, 41 Sutter St.
San Francisco, CA, 94104
Phone: 415-905-4663
E-mail: info@awc-hq.org
Serves programmers, analysts, technical writers, and entrepreneurs. Contact the national headquarters for local information.

Association for Women in Development (AWID)
Suite 825, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-628-0440
E-mail: awid@awid.org
Serves women working on international-development issues.

American Women in Radio and Television (AWRT)
Suite 200, 1650 Tysons Blvd.
McLean, VA 22102
Phone: 703-506-3290
E-mail: info@awrt.org
Serves women working in electronic media and related fields. Offers job-fax service.

Association for Women in Science (AWIS)
Suite 650, 1200 New York Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-326-8940; 800-886-AWIS
E-mail: awis@awis.org
The Association for Women in Science (AWIS) is a non-profit organization dedicated to achieving equity and full participation for women in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology. AWIS has more than 5,000 members in fields spanning the life and physical sciences, mathematics, social science, and engineering. Events at the 76 local chapters across the country facilitate networking among women scientists at all levels and in all career paths.

Association of Women in International Trade (WIIT)
PO Box 65962
Washington, DC 20035
Phone: 202-785-9842
Monthly events with speakers, periodic seminars on trade topics, and a job bank.

Business and Professional Women USA
1900 M Street NW, Suite 310
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-293-1100
Hosts meetings to discuss issues such as equity, job advancement, and networking.

Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW)
1201 Wakarusa Dr., Ste. C3
Lawrence, KS 66049
Phone: 785-832-1808
For women working in all facets of commercial real estate. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Financial Women International (FWI)
Suite 814, 200 N. Glebe Rd.
Arlington, VA 22203-3128
Phone: 703-807-2007
E-mail: info@fwi.org
Formerly known as the National Association of Bank Women, FWI serves women in banking and financial services.

Federally Employed Women (FEW)
Suite 425, 1400 I St., NW
Washington, DC 20005-2252
Phone: 202-898-0994
E-mail: few@few.org
Serves women in all levels of the federal government, including the military. Also offers a mentor program and seminars on policy and legislative processes.

International Alliance for Women in Music (IAWM)
Department of Music
George Washington University, NW
Washington, DC 20052
Phone: 202-994-6338
Serves composers, conductors, performers, and music lovers. Provides venues for female artists to perform and helps promote their shows.

National Association for Female Executives (NAFE)
60 East 42nd St., Suite 2700
New York, NY 10165
Phone: 212-351-6400
E-mail: nafe@nafe.com
With some 250,000 members nationwide and abroad, the National Association for Female Executives (NAFE) is the nation’s largest businesswomens’ association. NAFE provides resources and services through education, networking, and public advocacy to empower its members to achieve career success and financial security. NAFEís Web site provides information about NAFE, its membership benefits and services, and NAFE networks around the country. It also includes articles and information about business and management, selected articles from NAFE’s Executive Female magazine, and links to business-related sites.

National Association of Insurance Women
1847 E. 15th St.
Tulsa, OK 74104
Phone: 800-766-NAIW
E-mail: National@naiw.org
Provides opportunities for woman in the insurance industry to expand their circle of business contacts and knowledge through association activities such as state meetings, regional conferences and a national convention. Call the national office to locate local chapters.

National Association of Women Business Owners
Suite 1100, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-638-5322
Leadership training and a network for women who have been in business for themselves for more than eight years.

National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. — This nonprofit, volunteer organization is involved with community service, leadership develop and enhancing career opportunities through networking and programming. For information on NCBW chapters and programs in your area, contact the national headquarters at 212-947-2196, 38 West 32nd Street, Suite 1610, New York, New York 10001-3816. E-mail: NC100BW@aol.com.

National Women’s Political Caucus
Suite 425, 1211 Connecticut Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20036
Phone: 202-785-1100
Leadership and campaign-training programs.

Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) — The Organization of Women in International Trade (OWIT) is a non-profit professional organization designed to promote women doing business in international trade by providing networking and educational opportunities. Members include women and men doing business in all facets of international trade including finance, public relations, government, freight forwarding, international law, agriculture, sales and marketing, import/export, logistics, and transportation. Web site contains information about conferences, events, chapters in the United States and around the world, as well as a job bank. E-mail: ewhalley@worldnet.att.net

The Professional Business Women of Illinois (PBWI)
PO Box 151
Crystal Lake, IL 60039
Phone: 847-888-8551
E-mail: info@pbwi.net
PBWI’s mission is to provide a gateway for professional and personal growth through continuing education, community involvement and a network of combined resources.

Society of Women Engineers
120 Wall St.
New York, NY 10005
Phone: 212-509-9577
Contact the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women in Advertising and Marketing
4200 Wisconsin Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20016
Phone: 301-369-7400
Monthly networking dinners, speakers bureau, job bank.

Women in Aerospace (WIA)
204 E Street NE
Washington, DC 20002
Phone: 202.547.0229
WIA is dedicated to expanding women’s opportunities for leadership and increasing their visibility in the aerospace community. Offers networking and professional development opportunities.

Women in Housing and Finance (WHF)
6712 Fisher Ave.
Falls Church VA 22046
Phone: 703-536-5112
E-mail: whf@whfdc.org
Monthly luncheons, a job bank, professional development, and special-interest groups on insurance, securities, technology.

Women in International Security (WIIS)
Center for Peace and Security Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington, DC 20005-1145
Phone: 202-687-3366
E-mail: info@wiis.org
WIIS (pronounced “wise”) is dedicated to enhancing opportunities for women working in foreign and defense policy. An international, nonprofit, non-partisan network and educational program, WIIS is open to both women and men at all stages of their careers.

Women in Technology International (WITI)
13351 D-Riverside Drive #441
Sherman Oaks, CA 91423
Phone: 818-788-9484
E-mail: member-info@corp.witi.com
WITI’s mission is to empower women worldwide to achieve unimagined possibilities and transformations through technology, leadership and economic prosperity.

Women Presidents’ Organization (WPO)
155 East 55th Street, Suite 4-H
New York, NY 10022
Phone: 212-688-4114
E-mail: info@womenpresidentsorg.com
An organization for women whose businesses annually gross more than $2 million. The organization’s mission states: improving business conditions for women entrepreneurs and promoting the acceptance and advancement of women entrepreneurs in all industries.

Women’s Caucus for the Arts (WCA)
PO Box 1498, Canal St. Station
New York, NY 10013
Phone: 212-634-0007
Has established a national network through research, exhibitions, conferences and honor awards for achievement. Call the national headquarters for local contacts.

Women’s Information Network (WIN)
Suite 635, 1511 K St., NW
Washington, DC 20005
Phone: 202-347-2827
A Democratic group that serves mostly younger women. It features a job center and a well-reputed networking event, “Women Opening Doors for Women,” in which high-level professional women share their experiences at informal dinner parties.

Women’s National Book Association (WNBA)
3101 Ravensworth Pl.
Alexandria, VA 22302
Phone: 703-578-4023
Serves women in publishing, writing, and editing, as well as those who have an interest in books. Offers professional-development programs.

By Quint Careers

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